Scientific Program

Keynote Talks

Abstract

The launch vehicle and the spacecraft, during the lift-off stage, have to face drasticacoustic conditions. However, the payload fairing is usually designed by sandwich structures which are acoustically sensitive.. Therefore, in the design stage, the vibroacoustic criteria has to be taken into account.Predicting the flexural vibroacoustic behavior of sandwich cylindrical structures, in the low-mid frequency, are of interest in different industrial sectors. he main advantage of this kind of structures lies principally in the high stiffness-to-weight ratio. Typically, the sandwich structures are generally made of a lightweight, thick core bonded to a thin face-sheets. The vibroacoustic behavior is to be properly considered and specifically the transmission loss control in the low-mid frequency range... To address this problem, the present work describes a numerical approach for predicting the vibroacoustic response of a sandwich cylinder. The proposed approach is based on the wave finite element method (WFE method). The method combines the standard finite element method and the periodic structure theory. The cylindrical sandwich structure was modeled as a tridimensional waveguide structure which holds absolutely the meso-scale information of the modeled cylinder. A sound transmission loss expression of a cylindrical sandwich structure was derived. Thereafter, a parametric study was conducted for the sake of revealing the effect of the difference geometrical parameters on the vibroacoustic indicators. The obtained results of the developed TL expression have been compared with analytical model and they showed a good agreement..

Biography

Mohamed Ichchou is Professor of Solid Mechanics at ÉcoleCentrale de Lyon. He received a Bachelor of Science from the University of Franche-Comté (1990) and a joint M. Phil in Mechanics from ÉcoleCentrale de Lyon and the Claude Bernard University of Lyon-I (1992). He graduated in Engineering from L’ÉcoleCentralede Lyon in 1992 and obtained a PhD in Mechanical Engineering in 1996. He received his accreditation to supervise research in 2004. Mohamed Ichchou is a member of the editorial board of four international journals. He has authored more than 100 papers in international peer-reviewed journals. His main research interests are vibroacoustics, mid-high frequencies, and smart materials and structures. He has been involved in several European projects since the fourth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development (FP). He is also an independent expert for a number of European and international agencies.

Speaker
Mohamed Ichchou Univesit of Lyony

Abstract

This talk will describe the engineering challenges and the dangers of the Rosetta mission with a focus on the two landings that were performed on the comet - the first being the Philae lander in November 2014 and the second the Rosetta spacecraft itself when it landed to end the mission on 30th September last year. While summarising what is now known about the comet, the engineering & scientific techniques used by the team in taking measurements at the comet will be described including how the landing site of Philae was identified and what happened at landing. The presentation will go on to cover the dangers faced by the spacecraft when flying around the comet as it got closer to the sun before focussing in on the second and final landing. At this point, the steps required to land the mother craft Rosetta on the comet including how its the final resting site was chosen will be presented as well as providing a run through the final weeks & days & minutes leading to that event.

Biography

Laurence O’Rourke has being working for the European Space Agency since 1996, located at 3 of its establishments (ESTEC, ESOC and currently ESAC in Madrid) as an Engineer and a Scientist.As an engineer, he has worked on 6 satellite missions for ESA during this time. As Rosetta Downlink Science Operations Manager he jointly leads a large team of scientists and engineers at ESAC. Besides his day to day work on Rosetta, he also works on an exoplanet search mission called PLATO and an asteroid impact mission called AIM.As a scientist he publishes papers on asteroids and comets and based upon his Nature paper covering the first confirmed detection of water in the asteroid belt he was awarded an asteroid with his name from the IAU.

Speaker
Laurence O'Rourke European Space Agency,Europe

Abstract

The aerospace industry is currently facing several stringent design requirements. There is a need to increase performance and capacity while reducing the environmental impact and costs. The predicted demands on aerospace industry suggest that more radical design changes will be needed if CO2 emissions targets are to be made. Design of next generation aerospace systems incorporating novel technologies are characterized by a high number of interacting disciplines, which need to be considered in the design. The rapid evolution of computing technologies combined with advances in many disciplines including; electronics, sensing and communications, the use of new materials, and the development of more efficient power systems have significantly transformed and impacted the way aerospace design is conducted. During the last three decades, Multidisciplinary Design and Optimization (MDO) technology has received considerable research interest as an alternative design technology, which can address some of these design challenges. MDO is now positioned to make major contributions in the design of aerospace systems. Hence, a paradigm shift is underway that challenges the way complex aerospace systems are being designed. In this presentation, major challenges. in aerospace industry and how multi-disciplinary design optimization can help will be discussed. Several major research issues including; multidisciplinary aerospace systems design and optimization frameworks, robust and reliability-based aerospace systems design optimization and surrogate modelling in the context of multidisciplinary design optimization of aerospace systems will be presented. The impact of MDO will be exemplified by some recent aerospace systems design.

Biography

Dr Parviz Mohammad Zadeh is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of New Sciences and Technologies, Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Tehran. He is the Director of Multidisciplinary Design optimisation (MDO) Laboratory. Prior to this, he worked as an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering at the University of KNTU. In addition to these academic positions, he has held several research positions in the School of Engineering, Design and Technology University of Bradford and College of Aeronautics, University of Cranfield in the past. He has an extensive research record on various aspects of multidisciplinary design and optimization of aerospace systems, complex systems design, integration, concurrent design, computational modelling, robust and reliability-based design optimization, meta-modelling, design of experiments, optimization methods that leading to variety of aerospace applications. His research activity in the past 20 years resulted in a series of publications and has made significant contribution to the field of MDO specially the development of a multi-fidelity collaborative MDO framework for solving large-scale multidisciplinary aerospace design problems based on high-fidelity simulation models. He was also involved in several industrial collaborative projects on various aspects of multidisciplinary aerospace systems design and optimization.

Speaker
Parviz Mohammad Zadeh University of Tehran,Iran

Abstract

This talk will describe the role the Philae lander had to play in the highly successful Rosetta mission to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as well as the difficulties faced in trying to find it after it landed. Through imagery and video, Philae's successful "bouncy" landing on the 12th November 2014 as well as its on-comet science & engineering activities in the days that followed will be highlighted. With Philae's final location lost in the darkness on the southern part of this deep black icy comet, the presentation will then outline how it wasn't until a dedicated search campaign kicked off in March 2016 that the Rosetta team was able to hone in on its final position - a position finally imaged in early September 2016 when Philae was nestled between a 200 foot high ice rock and an icy cliff; an image which became one of the most widely shared from the Rosetta mission.

Biography

Laurence O’Rourke has being working for the European Space Agency since 1996, located at 3 of its establishments (ESTEC, ESOC and currently ESAC in Madrid) as an Engineer and a Scientist.As an engineer, he has worked on 6 satellite missions for ESA during this time. As Rosetta Downlink Science Operations Manager he jointly leads a large team of scientists and engineers at ESAC. Besides his day to day work on Rosetta, he also works on an exoplanet search mission called PLATO and an asteroid impact mission called AIM.As a scientist he publishes papers on asteroids and comets and based upon his Nature paper covering the first confirmed detection of water in the asteroid belt he was awarded an asteroid with his name from the IAU.

Speaker
Laurence O'Rourke European Space Agency,Europe

Abstract

4D printing of continuous fiber reinforced composites is a process that combines 3D printing and the reconfiguration of the part upon cooling from the cure temperature. The process came about due to the advent of automated fiber placement of long fiber polymer composites. This process is different from normal 4D printing. For normal 4D printing, plastics (normally unreinforced, or reinforced with short fibers) are deposited into a flat stack of layers. These plastics have special properties such that upon the activation due to some mechanisms (such as heat, light, magnetism or absorption of water) the material structure changes its shape into some curved configuration. The materials used in normal 4D printing usually have low mechanical strength and stiffness and can be very expensive. 4D printing of continuous fiber composites use the normal prepregs that have been used to make composite structures for commercial applications. The reconfiguration of the structure depends on the shrinkage of the resin upon cooling, and on the difference in coefficient of thermal contraction in layers of differentiation along different directions. It has been shown [1, 2] that curved shaped structures can be made by laying flat stack of carbon/epoxy prepregs. Upon cooling from the autoclave, these flat stacks reconfigure themselves into curved shapes. As such, curved shape structures can be made without the need for curved molds. This can result in significant saving in cost and money. In this presentation, the effect of shrinkage of the resin on the capacity of the composite structure to reconfigure is examined. Some resin shrinks more than others. Also, it is not the total amount of shrinkage that is important, it is the effective amount of shrinkage that is really important on the degree of reconfiguration. The effective shrinkage is the amount of shrinkage when the modulus of the resin has become high enough to be effective.

Biography

Professor,Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering. Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario, 1976 M.A.Sc., Mechanical Engineering, University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario, 1973 B.Sc., Mechanical Engineering, California State University San Luis Obispo, 1971 Member, Canadian Association for Composite Structures and Materials Member, American Society of Mechanical Engineers Member, Society for Advancement of Materials and Process Engineering Member, Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering Member, American Society for Composites

Speaker
Suong V. Hoa Concordia University,Canada

Abstract

India has experienced extraordinary growth in civil aviation over the past decade and is forecast to be one of the world’s largest aviation markets in just a few years with over 20% traffic growth. To achieve and afford the promise of civil aviation, India faces challenges posed by national and state policies, law, regulation and practice. If you look at the fundamental forces, the demographics, the movement in GDP, it all points towards a secular continued growth of the century. With that growth also comes the obvious challenge of infrastructure. Aerospace manufacturing is a high technology and capital intensive industry. Its value chain is characterized by a long project life cycle spanning R&D, engineering design, manufacturing, assembly, maintenance, repair and overhaul. Intensive technology and safety requirements require significant investments in R&D and quality control. However, with the need to cut costs and deliver products faster, aerospace design, development and production globally continues to undergo significant change. Over the next two decades, aerospace engineers face a remarkable set of new challenges involving applications of technology in airborne and spaceborne systems to meet demands that society is placing on this field. At the same time, aerospace engineering will see an equally remarkable set of exciting opportunities for providing entirely new systems and capabilities to society that most today cannot yet envision. The aerospace manufacturing sector in India is fragmented. There are various organizations in public and private sector and often one organization does not know what the others are doing, the capabilities and knowledge residing with them. Aerospace Engineering deals with the development of new technology in the field of aviation, space and defense systems. It involves design and manufacturing of hi-tech systems, hence the engineer requires possessing manual, technical and mechanical ability.

Biography

CURRENT POSITION: Dean, GITAM School of Technology(2nd July, 2014-till date) PREVIOUS POSITION: Founder Director Campus, GITAM University (5th June, 2009) EDUCATION Ph.D in Manufacturing Engineering, AICTE, QIP (GSIST, Indore, 2004) - Government MBA (HRD), BE (Manufacturing Engineering, 1989) ME in CAD/CAM & Automation, Government College of Engineering (Pune University, 1997) RESEARCH & ADMINISTRATIVE POSITIONS HELD – (Total Experience 24 Y = National 20 Y + International 4 Y) Member, Internal Quality Assurance Cell, GITAM University. Visiting Faculty, RGUKT, Basra, Adilabad District, Telangana Advisory board member, Commission of Enquiry, Telangana state Board of Director, Executive Council, Public Relations Council of India (PRCI) Dean, Faculty of Mechanical, Aero & Industrial Engineering, GITAM University Member, Board of Management/ Academic Council GITAM University Corporate Directorship, World Council of Corporate Governance (UK), Professor & Principal, Vaageswari College of Engineering Associate Professor, KUTKM, Malaysia / DYP, Pune Member, BOS, Research & Selection Committee for Various State/Deemed Universities

Speaker
Ch. Sanjay GITAM University, India

Sessions:

Abstract

The workshop will cover firstly a general definition of Friction welding methods such as Linear, Rotational and Orbital Friction welding as well as Friction Stir Welding/Processing. Then, it will focus on the different simulation models used for Friction Welding methods and will discuss why the simulation of Friction Stir Welding is very complicated. In the simulation models the strain, temperature distribution, material flow patterns and etc. will be investigated. The dissimilar welding (simulation and experiment) will be the next topicin the workshop. Finally the simulation of microstructural evolution over the solid state welding methods will be discussed due to its high demand in the literature and the researchers are very interested in learning these models.

Biography

Dr. Parviz Asadi is Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Engineering, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin, Iran. He has received his Master of science and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from University of Tehran in 2010 and 2015, respectively. Additionally, he has received the best-researcher-student award at University of Tehran in 2010 (MSc) and 2015 (PhD). Dr. Parviz Asadi’s research activities in recent10 years are focused on the fields of Friction Stir welding/ Processing, Activated TIG, VARTM composite manufacturing and resulted in about 50 ISI papers and a book with the title of “Advances in Friction Stir Welding and Processing”. He is now working on the new methods of metal recycling, specially Friction Stir Extrusion.

Speaker
Parviz Asadi Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin, Iran

Abstract

To start with, I would like to concentrate on the difference between education and training in Europe and in the Míddle East. As I grew up in Cairo/Egypt in a mixture of German, Egyptian and British Education I do know the differences. At age 8 I was transported to Germany to my Prussian Grandmother. Now I experienced educational style No. 4. At age 17 I was trained by quite a few very different German Flight Instructors and comparing this to other national styles of instruction shows, that any flight training according FAA or EASA for the Middle East and North Africa cannot work in the long run. The cultural differences of education have left their traces in the individual brains. Therefore my basic message for the Middle East and North Africa would be, to develop its own training program , with far less bureaucracy than EASA and far less American education and training based viewpoints, but a training schedule based on Mediterranean and African educational basis. The US and European rules and regulations cannot cater for quality, just for quantity and formality. Why do the UAE and now China want to copy useless European bureaucracy for people that had a completely different education and will experience a complete mix of training systems based on the bureaucracy of 28 European country training priorities?

Biography

Born in Egypt, grown up in Germany. Wanted to become a pilot since the age of 11. After school went to University but disliked the way of teaching there as well. So became a commercial pilot and IFR instructor. After several bankruptcies of companies he worked for and the experience of what psychological stress employees (flight crew) have to go through in this situation studied psychology. As the lecturing at universities still hadn't changed he became a LH Flight Instructor. Then flew 737-100 up to 737-500 and Airbus 310 and 300. Because he disliked the way flying was taught started a company for psychological flight crew training and is in many different ways active to inform about new ways of learning and teaching safety awareness.

Speaker
Thomas Fakoussa Captain, Egypt

Abstract

If someone performs a google search on “what training you need to be a CAA inspector” 395 thousand results are produced, with the top returns to be courses/training and guidance provided by world leading CAAs. A similar google search, for an “accident investigator training”, produces 1,180 thousand results, with only one University course being in the first returns.ICAO has produced, over the years, guidance on the training requirements for aviation professionals. It is already known that, “Airlines recorded zero accident deaths in commercial passenger jets last year, according to a Dutch consulting firm and an aviation safety group that tracks crashes, making 2017 the safest year on record for commercial air travel”, as per a recent Reuters article.Therefore, it is self-evident that historically, the aviation industry significantly improved, based on practitioners’ contribution. However, the recent development of the Annex 19 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation, requires a more scientific approach to safety, with the relevant stakeholders to work closer. It prompts the industry’s continual improvement of safety, with a clear safety policy and objective, governed by the State, driven by risk management, based on data, safety assurance, with a safety promotion program.Therefore, we need to improve further, that is why one of the solutions could be to engage the University know-how, as early as possible in the aviation professionals’ career. Usually, the load of professional education was taken up by the CAAs, MRO’s, Airlines, Airports, etc. However, these organisations are not educational expert organisations, but profit driven organisations. We may also identify a learning gap between Universities and the Industry, as the industry needs to re-train the hired professional to perform specific tasks. Ideally Educational Institutions should prepare someone to perform a task, or should provide him/her with enough knowledge and capabilities, so the person is “marketable” and able to start climbing the professional ladder, as early as possible. What do we need to do to prepare such professionals? A closer and more applied approach to researched based solutions, could assist industry to improve faster, with all stakeholders benefiting. The Educational/Training institutions could prepare professionals for the industry. These professionals will be able to produce safer results, faster for a better profitability results.

Biography

Captain Elias Nikolaidis is the Chief Air Accident Investigator of the UAE General Civil Aviation Authority and Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society. Elias after obtaining his UK pilot license joined the Hellenic Air Force as an Air Traffic Controller, in 1982. He spend 20 years with Olympic Airways where he flew many aircraft types, he was a TRI and TRE and held many management positions in Accident Investigation, Safety, Training and Quality departments of the Airline. In addition Elias was seconded to the Hellenic CAA, as a Flight Operations Inspector, following successful completion of the relevant UK CAA course and on the job training. He then became an independent consultant in the areas of CAA and Airline Reorganization, Accident Investigation, Quality, Safety and Flight Operations. He has several published research on Human Factors and Safety and he holds a Master’s Degree in aerospace manufacturing design and management from Bristol University. He served a three years term as a member of the Hellenic Air Accident Investigation and Safety Board, a position that he had to leave in order to join GCAA in 2009. Elias has participated in more than 100 investigations serving as an Investigator In Charge, member of the Investigation Team or an Accredited Representative.

Speaker
Elias Nikoaidis Royal Aeronautical Society,UK

Abstract

Providing thermal comfort and good air quality are important factors to create a healthy and comfortable environment for passengers in airplane. The current ventilation system is the mixed one, 50% of air is fresh air from outside and the other 50% is recirculated air from the cabin. Personalized systems are introduced to improve those two factors. In this research the air distribution system is a combined system between the mixed ventilation system and the gaspers, the effect of the gaspers are investigated on the whole cabin of the economy section of BOEING 777 commercial aircraft. Temperature and velocity distributions are discussed; also PMV and PPD are used to predict the thermal sensation of passengers. It was found that the gaspers increase the air velocity in the cabin, makes the temperature distribution more uniform, and provide thermal comfort for passenger on his demand. The investigation is done by computational fluid dynamics package (ANSYS FLUENT 15.0), FLUENT is the solver, it solves the continuity, momentum, energy, and turbulence model equations. Meshes with sizes between 6,000,000 and 7,000,000 cells are generated in each case. The main conclusions can be summarized as • Combining the mixed air and personalized ventilation system provides better ventilation. • Gaspers increase the velocity of air in cabin and make the temperature more uniform. • The locations of gaspers affect the thermal comfort, as it gets nearer to the passenger the thermal comfort feelings improves.

Biography

Prof. Essam E.Khalil has completed his London University, Imperial College in 1977,He is professor of Energy at Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. He is AIAA Fellow, ASME Fellow and ADSHRAE Fellow. He has published more than 825 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of reputed Journals.

Speaker
Essam E. Khalil Cairo University,Egypt

Abstract

A high altitude flying wing UAV is presented together with test flights performed in Finland in July, 2014 and June, 2015 in support of European Space Agency (ESA) Earth surveillance missions. The UAV uses an innovative inertial autopilot, which is able to automatically steer the flying wing UAV from 30 km altitude to targets placed at several hundred kilometers with meters accuracy. The detailed system is presented together with the communication capabilities from high altitude and long ranges. It is also presented the capability to fly automatically without high altitude GPS capability. Various applications are envisioned for the high altitude flying wing UAV beyond the support for automatic payload recovery. These applications take advantage of the high efficiency design and high precision (5-10 meters) achievable at long ranges (600 km range). The developed high altitude UAV is useful for a wide range of high altitude balloon missions and can reduce or even elliminate the complicated logistics associated with recovery of high altitude balloon missions. At the same time the system opens opportunities for missions in difficult environments (e.g.: Arctic, Antarctica, small islands etc.) where otherwise the recovery would pose complicated problems.

Biography

Florin Mingireanu has been for the past 10 years a research scientist specialized in propulsion at the Romanian Space Agency and is Romanian delegate at the European Space Agency – Programme Board Launchers. For the past 12 years he has been consultant for several aerospace/MoD companies working in the area of unguided/guided missiles. Florin Mingireanu holds a BSc – Physics and Astronomy from Louisiana State University and a MSc in Aerospace Engineering from Polytechnics University of Bucharest. Florin’s research interest are focused on development of solid/hybrid rocket motors, impulsive agile attitude control, development of various numerical models for interior and exterior ballistics.

Speaker
Mingireanu Florin Romanian Space Agency (ROSA),Romania

Abstract

This research is aimed at the quest of potential improvement of the aerodynamic Lift-to-Drag ratio of a tapered high aspect ratio supercritical airfoil wing, typical for a modern passenger aircraft by means of two bio-inspired wingtip device solutions: A CFD and experimentally tested Wingtip Leading Edge Triangular Extension (WLETE), which is a passive vortex and lift generating device of delta planform and large relative area, installed along the leading edge ahead of the wingtip, and a math modelled and CFD approved classical R. Whitcomb winglet, featuring a spanwise curve, plus their combination. Low speed wind tunnel experiments of WLETE on a seaplane demonstrator, that took place last year at Moscow Aviation Institute Aerodynamics Department, revealed a positive effect of this device on the wing tip local field, but typical seaplane low velocity flow regimes made flow field changes hardly measurable, thus a much higher velocity investigation was required to fully uncover the potential of these devices. For high subsonic simulation, DLR-F4 wing-body prototype was chosen as a validation and experimental database for performing the CFD simulations on a transport aircraft demonstrator, which first results revealed the relative advantage of these devices, both when individually installed and in combination with a large-sweep-angle raked winglet in terms of reducing the induced drag with a much lower weight penalty, manifested in a much lower wing root bending moment, as compared with the classical winglets. The mathematical model used for the curved winglet shape parametrization through a second order function and its optimization, was developed from the analyze of the winglet shape impact on the winglet local flow field, namely, the impact of the winglet cant angle on the spanwise-local angle of attack at each section of the winglet span. The quest for an optimal second order transition from the winglet root to its tip was found to deeply depend on three-dimensional effect of the winglet local flow field, which is dominated by a strong interference with the main wing tip vortex, as well as the winglet’s own downwash and its smaller own tip vortex. Math modelling of this three-dimensional effect and its inclusion in the parametrization function is beyond the scope of this paper, but CFD visualization of the winglet local flow field allowed us to approximately estimate its spanwise dependence: local angle of attack at the winglet root was observed to be higher due to tip vortex from the wing, blowing on the bottom surface of the winglet root (before swirling into a vortex immediately downstream the winglet), and a reduced local angle of the attack at the tip due the winglet’s own downwash and [much smaller] tip vor-tex. Intuitive and math analysis on how to get the best local angle of attack winglet-spanwise distribution has led us to consider an elliptic shape para-metrization. The result of this work is a bio-inspired, innovative way of wingtip device parametrization and optimization for a sustainable fuel efficiency of passenger airliners both at cruising, and at high-angles-of-attack takeoff and climb.

Biography

2013 - 2014 - Graduated in parallel from two departments: A Master of science with honors at the "Aircraft Design" Department at Moscow Aviation Institute (MAI) and an Aeronautical English Translator-Linguist degree at "Foreign Languages" Departement (also at MAI). 2014 - Now - Working on PhD Thesis "Innovative wingtip Devices for Transport Aircraft" performing research at the "Flying Vehicles Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer" Departmenet at MAI, other duties at the same department include teaching and CFD/wind-tunnel testing. 09/2014 - 11/2015 - Was responsible of International Academic Mobility at MAI International Department. 02/2016 - 03/2017 - took a one-year-contract post at the Engineering Centre of Airbus in Russia (ECAR), as a Design Engineer (Mechanical Systems Installation) Notable rewards include The 3-rd place at "Best Aircraft Design Graduation Thesis 2013" by SUKHOI Design Bureau.

Speaker
Djahid Gueraiche Research Assistant, Moscow Aviation Institute

Abstract

Investigation reports continue to highlight the relationship between affective states and poor safety outcomes. However, to date we have a limited understanding of this interaction. Methods: A total of 302 sectors of normal airline flight operations were observed, and instances of heightened emotional activity, threat occurrence and management were systematically recorded using an a priori classification system. Descriptive analyses of the occurrence of HEA were undertaken prior to examination of the relationship between HEA and threat outcome. Results: A total of 535 instances of HEA were identified across the 302 sectors of normal flight operations. Significant differences were observed with respect to the occurrence of HEA both as a function of a phase of flight and the types of threat encountered. Instances of HEA were associated with changes in threat response and increased occurrence of error. Conclusion: The findings of this study demonstrate that HEA was observed in association with threats during normal flight operations. Moreover, the occurrence of HEA was associated with increased rates of threat mismanagement and subsequent error. Application: This study highlights the role of HEA in operational safety, and suggests that training in the recognition and management of affective response to threats is a much-needed addition to Crew Resource Management (CRM) programs.

Biography

Applied human factors research and safety management systems program development for industries that operate in high-risk environments. CRM/HF and Fatigue Management programs that focus on awareness vital to corporate concerns and industry regulatory compliance. LOSA observation conducted with major international airline as integral component of PhD research into emotional responses to perceived threats in high-risk environments. Capabilities include military, commercial airline, and emergency medical systems (EMS) ground and aviation HF/SMS development. Operations management of flight training program developing operating procedures and regulatory compliance for industry.

Speaker
Doug Drury University of South Australia

Abstract

It has been widely recognized that the world is in need of sustainable sources of energy. One possibility is space solar, in which sunlight is collected in space (where it is brighter than anywhere on earth and is unaffected by clouds or night) and sent wirelessly to the earth. This would be a clean, constant, globally dispatchable source of energy. Recent advances in several key technologies now make it imperative to seriously investigate space solar as a prospective future energy source. These technologies include advancements in the mass production of spacecraft, breakthroughs in power conversion electronics and lightweight materials, emerging space robotics capabilities, and reusable commercial launch. Though the space solar has been examined in the past, these new developments combined with the unprecedented projected need for clean energy demand that it now be included as part of any “all of the above” energy strategy. Moreover, today, developing countries and disaster response teams face similar energy challenges to those presented to forward-deployed armed forces in terms of resource scarcity and lack of power infrastructure. No compelling solution has emerged that advances security and prosperity, and that clearly promotes international interests. Though these problems are formidable, a remarkable opportunity exists for a motivated nation to become a power utility for the world.

Biography

Dr. Paul Jaffe is an electronics engineer, researcher, and integration and testing section head with in excess of 23 years of experience at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). He has worked on over a dozen NASA, NOAA, DARPA, Air Force, and other sponsor space missions, including SSULI, STEREO, TacSat-1, TacSat-4, MIS, CARINA, and RSGS. He led spacecraft computer hardware development and developed standards as part of the Department of Defense’s Operationally Responsive Space effort. He served as coordinator and editor of NRL’s Space Solar Power (SSP) study report and was the principal investigator for a ground-breaking SSP-related research effort. His current roles include program management and systems engineering of several NRL projects. He serves as a lecturer for the Aerospace Engineering Department at the University of Maryland. He has over 40 journal, conference, and patent publications and is the recipient of numerous awards. Dr. Jaffe has made many international television and radio appearances, including on MSNBC and the Science Channel’s “Through the Wormhole with Morgan Freeman.” He is also active in educational and STEM outreach.

Speaker
Paul Jaffe Naval Research Laboratory, USA

Abstract

Most developing countries are looking for possible ways to transfer technology. Aerospace industry is one of the sectors that can contribute to break the barriers of technology and hence upgrade the technological level of those countries. This idea was exactly behind a research project funded by the Libyan authority for research and technology. It deals with a full plan to design and build a two-seat trainer aircraft locally. Only the first stage of design (conceptual design and partially the Preliminary design), were considered and covered in a paper published previously. In this paper the emphases is put on the requirements of manufacturing and certification. This part represents the most challenging requirement of the aircraft development project. The main requirements of building the aircraft such as manufacturing workshops, manpower specialization and man power build up with time are presented and discussed. Manufacturing and testing requirements were presented too. Requirements of certification were also discussed and presented. Flight test procedures were introduced. Suggestions for international regulations to be applied to make sure that the performance of the designed aircraft meets the international certification requirements were introduced. Other aspects related to the levels of the responsibility, and overall management of the project, were introduced. Reference to the most recent quality control techniques was also discussed. At last, the research team tried to work out a full comprehensive plane, ready to implement, for producing the trainer aircraft locally. However, solutions suggested may not be unique and they are open for discussion and amendment. Even though, there is a strong believe that this is the first time were such full design and development plane is introduced in one piece of research

Biography

1980 B.Sc. In Aeronautical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tripoli-Libya. 1987 M.Eng, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. 1998 Ph.D., In Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland. December 2002 to March 2007: Dean Of The Faculty of Engineering, University of Tripoli-Libya. 2003-2007: Head of General Board of The Engineering Consultation Brue. 2007-2008, Member of The Evaluation Committee for Small and Medium Enterprise Projects ( Business Incubation Project). 2009 up to Augus1 2013: Member of the Management Board at TATWEER Company for Investment. From August 2011 up to September 2013: Chairman of Management Board and General Manager at TATWEER Company for Investment. Currently, full professor of, Aerodynamics and Flight Mechanics, at the Department of Aeronautical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tripoli, Tripoli-Libya.

Speaker
Abdulhamid A. Ghmmam University of Tripoli, Libya

Abstract

One of the challenges of aerospace science is the reduction of drag. At low speeds, by preventing the separation of flow and also reducing the level of friction, the drag can be reduced. Axisymmetric bodies have numerous industrial applications and can also be used to study many phenomena in the fluid dynamics including the separation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate numerically the flow around a cylinder body (length of L and diameter D) with different nose shapes (parabolic and conical head with various apex angle) which is aligned with the free stream to obtain the best fineness ratio (L/D) and nose shape which causes minimum drag. By changing the head, its effects on the flow separation and shape of the resultant wake at Reynolds number 100,000 (based on D) and also the effect of this separation on the drag coefficient has been studied. It can be found that for optimum fineness ratio of 1.5, the best nose is a parabolic.

Biography

Kamyar Mansour has completed his PhD from Stanford university 1988, USA and currently he is professor in aero space department at Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran. He has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals and more than hunderd international conferences. Ghazal Hosseinzadeh is Phd student in aero space department at Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.

Speaker
Kamyar Mansour Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran

Abstract

Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an area of growing interest and worthy of new and innovative approaches. Today’s aircraft requires scheduled maintenance for performing offline nondestructive evaluation which causes a huge operational downtime. However, the scheduled maintenance may become too late or sometimes too early to assess any critical condition when the aircraft is on the fly. The next generation aircraft demands for an online SHM that may replace scheduled maintenance with as–needed maintenance. Thus it could save the cost of unnecessary maintenance as well as prevent unscheduled maintenance. Admittedly, the field of structural health monitoring is very vast. A variety of sensors, methods, and data reduction techniques can be used to achieve the common goal of asking the structure “how it feels” and determining the state of its “health”, i.e., structural integrity, damage presence (if any), and remaining life. It can be performed in two main ways: (a) passive SHM; and (b) active SHM. Passive SHM is mainly concerned with measuring various operational parameters and then inferring the state of structural health from these parameters. For example, one could monitor the flight parameters of an aircraft (airspeed, air turbulence, g–factors, vibration levels, stresses in critical locations, etc.) and then use the aircraft design algorithms to infer how much of the aircraft useful life has been used up and how much is expected to remain. In contrast, active SHM is concerned with directly assessing the state of structural health by trying to detect the presence and extent of structural damage. Active SHM approach is similar with the approach taken by nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methodologies, only that the active SHM takes it one–step further: active SHM attempts to develop damage detection sensors that can be permanently installed on the structure and monitoring methods that can provide on demand a structural health bulletin. Some examples such as aerospace rivet-hole cracks monitoring by using hybrid global-local active SHM method, fatigue damage monitoring by using passive SHM methods would be demonstrated.

Biography

Md Yeasin Bhuiyan will be defending his PhD in early 2018 from University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA. He has double masters degree, one in Mechanical Engineering and one in Aerospace Engineering from University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA. He has a Bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering. He is the lab director of Laboratory of Active Materials and Smart Structures, a premier laboratory of University of South Carolina. He has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals and international conferences. He has written several book chapters. He is currently doing active research in Aerospace materials and structural health monitoring for Aircraft structures.

Speaker
Md Yeasin BHUIYAN University of South Carolina, USA

Abstract

There is a pilot shortage on our planet. A recent study, Boeing reported that more than 637,000 new pilots will be needed in the next 20 years representing nearly 87 new pilots every day for the next two decades. CAE estimated last summer that more than 90,000 pilots will be needed by 2027. As the middle-class expands in the Asia-Pacific region, ICAO predicts that this area will need 230,000 pilots by 2030. While creating a flight training unit (FTU) has always been a challenging task, finding solutions to the pilot shortage also bring its own challenges. For example, instructors are hard to find. Aircraft are expensive to lease and/or buy. Cash flow is directly dependent on the weather and Mother Nature. All these challenges are deeply linked to the success of a flight training organization. Becoming a viable start-up entity, based in the heart of the coldest national capital on the planet, Ottawa Aviation Services (OAS) is an impressive leader in the flight training world. OAS has established in recent years important alliances and partnerships with the most respected airlines in Canada, such as Jazz, Aviation LP and Porter Airlines. These partnerships have secured the OAS motto stating that aviation jobs for every student. But how can we make sure that our students get access to an aviation job that is the most efficiently possible in order to address the pilot shortage that we are currently facing? The answer is a bold one and could be depicted as the core of OAS vision. Our vision is to propel flight training management into the digital era and revolutionize the industry. OAS, under the vision of its President and CEO Cedric Paillard, has envisioned a modern, innovative, high quality and competency-based flight training for fixed and rotary aircraft. Within the past five years, new technologies and methods of working associated with the business models have revolutionized the traditional aerospace and aviation industries. A large pool of new methods and processes originating from the high-tech sector could provide an infinite source of alternatives for the delivery of flight training and that anywhere in the world. This is our vision and we are convinced that these new methods and processes could play a major role to resolve the pilot shortage issue. New technologies and processes such as the implementation of digital systems, virtual reality, augmented reality, synthetic environment and, in the future, electrical aircraft, will reduce OAS’ training cycle between 25 to 40% while improving quality and efficiencies in our flight training programs. Innovation in the high tech world is the key to alleviating the growing pilot shortage.

Biography

An energetic, committed and efficient bi-lingual policy and business professional with four years of legislative experience at the Senate of Canada. Alexis David Fafard is a Canadian lawyer, aviator and entrepreneur. Upon graduation from the University of Ottawa Faculty of Law, he began his career in the public sector as a policy advisor to several prominent Canadian parliamentarians in the Senate of Canada. During his career, Alexis worked with several stakeholder personnel involved in important economic sectors including energy, transportation and high-tech industries who were interacting with parliamentary inquiries. Having always been highly interested in the aviation industry, Alexis achieved his private pilot accreditation in 2011 and is currently completing his commercial pilot licence at Ottawa Aviation Services Inc. as well as contributing to the company’s business development as its Vice President. Passionate about flight training and the development of efficient vehicles to transfer knowledge, Alexis strongly believes in the use of advanced and creative technology to deliver efficient high quality flight training. When Alexis is not preoccupied at Ottawa Aviation Services, he can be spotted in the skies of Canada piloting a variety of aircraft.

Speaker
ALEXIS DAVID FAFARD OTTAWA AVIATION SERVICES INC., Vice President,Canada

Abstract

Several standards and systems have been developed to protect high value assets such as Turbomachinery. Even so, some of these critical machines continue to fail with very little warning of impending failure to operators. Most of these failures are due to overloading which causes excessive alternating stresses and related fatigue damage. General fatigue failures occur from stress-based conditions which can be tracked by vibration measurements. When abnormal conditions occur, the stresses reach near yield conditions at failure locations. The life of machine components depends on strain-based estimations. Several failures have gone undetected in recent years due to the limited effectiveness of the prognostics capability in real time protection systems. ISO 13381-1:2015 provides guidance for the development and application of prognosis processes. The standard provides guidelines for monitoring and estimating remaining life for failure events based under the prevailing conditions of steady and unsteady stresses. In this paper, such critical failures are described, investigations on lifing of these machines are presented and methods of predicting life are discussed for taking preventive steps before failure occurs. Tip-timing system is presented to measure on-line rotor blade vibration and estimate the life.

Biography

Head of Department, Professor Romuald Rządkowski graduated from Gdansk University of Technology and in Mathematics at Gdansk University. From 1983 he has been an employee of the Institute of Fluid Flow Machinery (IFFM) of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Gdansk. He was awarded PhD in 1988 and DSc in 1998 at the IFFM. From the beginning of his work he has been occupied with the problems of dynamics of fluid flow machinery and he has specialized in the area of free, forced vibration in bladed discs, unsteady forces and flutter. His scientific achievements include 2 books, 98 work published in Polish and foreign scientific journals and in conference materials, as well as 116 works of a technical character.

Speaker
Romuald Rzadkowski Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland

Abstract

Over the last 60 years, research and technology advancements in aircraft design have been impressive and have significantly contributed in enhancing safety, reducing non-recurring and recurring costs of modern aircraft design and operation. Increased collaboration amongst the research institutions, universities and the industry have helped accelerate the introduction of such new technologies. In parallel, Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM’s) of aircraft have been constantly changing the landscape of their engineering design organizations and the engineering skill sets required so as to utilize and reap the benefits of such new technologies. Today’s engineering disciplines within the engineering aircraft design organizations are way different with several new disciplines added to the design teams. Additionally, a typical aircraft development program nowadays involves hundreds of global Tier 1 and Tier 2 suppliers as well as Small to Medium Enterprises (SME’s). This resulted in a significant shift of the skill sets from the OEM’s organizations to the Suppliers organizations and vise-versa. The following presentation provides a brief history of research and technology advancements in the last 60 years specific to aircraft designs and how they impacted today’s aircraft design organizations landscape and the engineering skill sets required. With the increased aircraft complexity and the highly specialized engineering organizations and disciplines involved, the OEM’s challenge remains to further improve aircraft multi-disciplinary integration and to introduce multi-disciplinary optimization (MDO) and oversight new processes.

Biography

Mr. Hany Sadek has completed his Master’s degree in Aerospace Engineering from University of Toronto in 1982. He has more than 32 years of aircraft design and certification experience at Bombardier aerospace. In varying engineering roles, he has been directly involved in almost all Bombardier aircraft development programs spanning different design types including the Canadair Water Bomber 415Turboprop, all Bombardier Regional Jet series, the new C-Series 100/300, and business aircraft including the Challenger 600/650, Challenger 300, Global Express 500/700/800 and learjet85. His last position at Bombardier was Senior Engineering Advisor when he retired in May 2016 to pursue his passion of passing his industry knowledge to future aerospace engineers through university teaching and professional courses so as to bridge the ap between the industry and academia. In addition to teaching, he is also a Senior Consultant at AeroSciences Consultants in Montreal. He is currently a Design Approval Delegate (DAR) with Transport Canada, Flight Test Analyst in the disciplines of Aircraft Performance and Stability and Control.

Speaker
Hany Sadek Concordia University, Montreal

Abstract

In this article, we developed a computer code of Galerikan Finite Element method (GFEM) for three dimensional flow equations of nano-plasma fluid(blood) in the presence of uniform applied magnetic field when Hall and ion slip current are significant. Lorentz force is calculated through generalized Ohm’s law with Maxwell equations. A series of numerical simulations are carried out to search η_max and algebraic equations are solved by Gauss-Seidel method with simulation tolerance 〖10〗^(-8).Simulated results for special case have an excellent agreement with the already published results. Velocity components and temperature of the nano-plasma(blood) are influenced significantly by the inclusion of nano-particles of Copper (Cu) and Silver (Ag). Heat enhancement is observed when copper and silver nonmagnetic nanoparticles are used instead of simple base fluid (conventional fluid). Radiative nature of nano-plasma in the presence of magnetic field causes a decrease in the temperature due to the transfer of heat by the electromagnetic waves. In contrast to this, due to heat dissipated by Joule heating and viscous dissipation phenomena, temperature of nano-plasmaincreases as thermal radiation parameter is increased. Thermal boundary layer thickness can be controlled by using radiative fluid instead of non-radiative fluid. Momentum boundary layer thickness can be reduced by increasing the intensity of the applied magnetic field. Temperature of plasma in the presence magnetic field is higher than the plasma in the absence of magnetic field

Biography

Will be updated soon...

Speaker
Muhammad Nawaz Institute of Space Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan

Abstract

The ongoing integration of unmanned aircraft in National Airspace System (NAS) poses a number of challenging design and operational tasks requiringprofound understanding of aircraft unsteady responses in turbulent flow environments and effective means of their control. As part of the long-term collaboration with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), NASA and Air Force Research Lab (AFRL), a series of benchmark high-fidelity numerical studies were conducted to modelthe flight-path unsteady responses of small fixed-wing aircraft in terminal and urban zonescharacterized by sudden crosswinds and turbulent drafts that have a particularly strong effect on small-vehicle aerodynamics and overall flight stability in the transitional flow regimes. We report on the results of these studies and identify a number of criticalfactors affecting the performance and design of small unmanned fixed-wing aircraft for enhanced aerodynamic efficiency and flight control.

Biography

Dr. Vladimir V. Golubev received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from University of Notre Dame. Before joining ERAU in 2001, he had several years of industrial experience with the Trane Company. More recently, he was awarded summer fellowships with NASA GRC in 2002-2003, and AFRL in 2005-2007. With over 50 publications, Dr. Vladimir Golubev has an extensive experience in both theoretical and computational aeroacoustics, with current research focus in the areas of CFD and MDO applied to unsteady aerodynamics and aeroacoustics of propulsion systems. He developed several CFD analysis codes with focus on predicting complex unsteady fluid-structure interaction phenomena, with benchmark applications including unsteady aerodynamics and aeroacoustics of swirling cascade flows and unsteady rotor-stator interactions, unsteady nozzle and jet flows, high-amplitude gust-airfoil and gust-wing aeroelastic interactions, and MDO applied to optimal turbomachinery design and noise control in propulsion systems. At ERAU, he established, and is currently the director of the Propulsion and Aerodynamics Computational Laboratory (PACL).

Speaker
Vladimir V. Golubev Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, USA

Abstract

Metal/plastic composites have been receiving unprecedented attention from the academia, mainstream media, investment community and national governments around the world because of their unique properties. This paper presents a new hybrid process for the production of high-quality metal/plastic composites. The process is a combination of Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM), vacuum forming and CNC machining. The research aims to provide details of the proposed hybrid process, equipment used and the experimental results of the composites which have been produced by stacking copper mesh (99.99% pure) layers on ABS (plastic). They have been subjected to flexural loading with a different number of metal mesh layers to serve as a proof of the methodology. The composites have been compared to ABS samples made according to British and International standards. The test results show that the Cu/ABS samples have higher fracture load values compared to the parent ABS sample. Furthermore, as the number of Cu mesh layers increase in a single specimen, the fracture loads also increased demonstrating the effectiveness of the new hybrid process. The initial results are very promising and open up new horizons for the production of high-quality metal/plastic composites in a cost-effective and proficient manner that can be used for aerospace and aeronautical applications.

Biography

Javaid was awarded a fully funded studentship for PhD studies from the Department of Engineering & Built Environment at Anglia Ruskin University. He designed a new additive manufacturing process for the production of metal/composite parts and was awarded his doctorate degree in 2016. Javaid was also awarded merit scholarship during his MSc in Advanced Mechanical Engineering Science/Mechatronics at the University of Southampton. For his Masters project, he designed a novel mechanism for the production of multiple material parts using a desktop based 3D printer. Javaid was the recipient of Pakistan Government’s merit scholarship during his undergraduate studies in Mechatronics & Control Engineering at University of Engineering & Technology. His final year project was on the design of a master-slave dexterous robotic hand. Javaid’s current research focuses on interlacing existing manufacturing practices (subtractive, additive and hybrid) with advanced robotics for engineering applications.

Speaker
Javaid Butt Anglia Ruskin University, UK

Abstract

The International Space Station (ISS) is a great international achievement, designed as a flexible laboratory able to support science in a range of disciplines. However making use of the ISS is still not attractive for a large number of potential users, due to the burden of complex rules, procedures and duration associated. The International Commercial Experiment Cubes (ICE Cubes) service is providing fast-track, simplified and affordable access to the ISS under a public/private partnership with ESA. The service enables any organization, public or private entity to perform experiments on the ISS. As such the ICE Cubes service provides for a very appealing asset and innovative approach for capacity building by providing access to space for the broad community. The ICE Cubes service is particularly suited for: • Fundamental or applied research, • University studies (Bachelor, Master and Doctoral theses), • Technology Readiness Level enhancement of components, • In-orbit testing and validation of technologies, • Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education. The ICE Cubes service supports the process of experiment development and takes care of flight certification, launch and installation onboard. Once the experiment is installed in the ICE Cubes Facility the user can operate it from his home base. Customers can develop their own Experiment Cubes according to a specific set of interface and safety requirement documents. The users remain owners of their experiments and results.

Biography

After a PhD in plasma-astrophysics at the KU Leuven Belgium, Hilde Stenuit started working with Space Applications Services. After working operations for spacecraft (ATV) and International Space Station (ISS) experiments, she supported more than a decade the ESA ISS Mission Science Office, seeing the execution of all ISS partners’ science experiments. Now Hilde is using her expertise to guide the users of the ICE Cubes program and to do business development for the first European commercial ISS platform ICE Cubes.

Speaker
Stenuit Hilde Space Applications Services, Netherlands

Abstract

All engineering fields went through a tremendous change during the last ten years, when the new technologies brought about unpredictable supports to engineers. The tri-dimension printing is only one exampleamong many. In the Aeronautical Engineering domain, however, some of these changes are shifting from being a conventional interface between the man and the machine to becoming an integral part of the system. (The embedded safety systems arejust one example). Although such integration is widening the spectrum of the aeronautical engineering education, and calls for users to be more clever in using their systems, it also requires that they become more competent solvers of complicated machineryproblems especially when they are left to their own. These changes are not only curricular. It is not enough to change the content of the curriculum, but it is more needed to go for new methodology for teaching, adopting a new paradigm by preparing the future engineers to deal with new trends of machinery and support systems. It calls for imparting them with the sense of readiness for change, for adaptation, and for initiative. This cannot be done through a classical curriculum approach. Adopting an educational system based on acquiring the needed competencies, on mastering High Mental skills, and on problem-based learning is the path we have to advocate for. The objective of this presentation is to show how this strategy can be adopted, what will its ultimate results and implication beon Engineering education.

Biography

After a study period in Lebanon, Professor Nahas obtained a D.E.A. in Mathematics from Université de Paris and a PhD in Education, from Université René Descartes - Paris V, France. He is currently Vice President of the University of Balamand in charge of Planning and Educational Relations, and Dean of the Faculty of Library and Information Studies. Previously, he taught at the Lebanese University, at St. Joseph University and since 1988 he has been working at the University of Balamand. He was the Principal of the Collège Notre Dame du Balamand (1975–1993), Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, at the University of Balamand (1988–1995), and Dean of the Saint John of Damascus Institute of Theology, at the University of Balamand (2005-2010). He is Professor of Education; Member of the Lebanese Association of Educational Sciences (LAES) since 1995; Member of the National Committee of the "Ministry of Education and the Higher Education", since 1996; and he sits on the Société Européenne pour la Formation des Ingénieurs (SEFI), Belgique, since 2008. Prof. Nahas has also participated in many international seminars and published a large number of articles, three manuals of teaching and three books related to his fields of interest. He has also published many articles and four books related to the Orthodox Church. His academic research focuses on Cognitive Psychology in the Field of Conceptualization and the impact of the Conceptual Fields' Theory on different aspects of school and university education, mainly in terms of efficiency and quality.

Speaker
Georges N. NAHAS University of Balamand,Lebanon

Abstract

The External Magnetic Field (ExMF) is thought to represent one of the three sources of Energies that power the natural activities in the Universe, the interaction of the produced External Magnetic Field (ExMF) with inter atomic components of diamagnetic materialsproduce the External Magnetic Field-Propulsion (ExMF-P), this as a new concept of propulsion, will revolutionize the transportation's industry,and greatly change the bases of the airspace industries, both in the technological and navigation systems, the success of humanity to harness this energy, will causeparadigm shift indifferent aspects of life developed during the past one century, with great consequences ontheeconomical, security and environmentalsystems of life,which will havegreat effectson the aviation and transportation industry, hence we suggested a model to guide this shift, based on widening the scope of the project to be inclusive, which will all lead to smooth transition and transformation that will protect human interests on different fields and levels of human activities.

Biography

Dr. Mahmoud E Yousif is currently working at Department of Physics, The University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya. Mahmoud research interest includes Aerospace, Astrophysics . Mahmoud is an honorary Author for Journal of Astrophysics and Aerospace technology. Mahmoud has authored of several research articles like Exploring the High-altitude Nuclear Detonation and Magnetic Storms.

Speaker
Mahmoud E. Yousif The University of Nairobi, Kenya

Abstract

Fault detection and reconfigurable control has become on-demand research area in the recent years. The main objective of a fault tolerant control system is to maintain the overall stability of the system in an acceptable performance level in case of a fault/faults occurred in the system components. There are two types of fault tolerant control strategies as shown in Fig. 1, which are active fault tolerant control and passive fault tolerant control. Passive fault tolerant control is implemented with a constant feedback controller while the active control uses on-line fault accommodation and on-line controller-reconfiguration. When examining analytical diagnostic techniques, there have been developed for decades. Many of these techniques have been used the results of modern control theory. This is not an unusual situation because the fault detection process is a part of the overall control process. The use of fault detection and isolation systems is very important especially in aircraft systems which the faults cause serious consequences. In this study, the sensor faults detection of an aircraft is performed in Matlab / Simulink simulation environment.Observer based fault detection method is used for an aircraft. The aim of the observer-based fault detection method is to generate a residual, which is called a fault indicator (Alyaka and Eker, 2010). The aircraft used in this work is a linearized aircraft model in an equilibrium condition. All of the inputs to the system are assumed to be available through measurements and used in the observer construction (Kıyak et al., 2008).

Biography

Speaker
Demet Canpolat Tosun Anadolu University, Turkey

Abstract

In principle, a blunt vehicle flying at hypersonic speeds generates a strong bow shock wave ahead of its nose which is responsible for the high drag and aeroheating levels. There have been a number of efforts devoted towards reducing both the drag and aeroheating by modifying the flowfield ahead of the vehicle’s nose. Of these techniques, using spikes is the simplest and the most reliable technique. A spike is simply a slender rod attached to the stagnation point of the vehicle’s nose. The spike introduces two major alternations to the flowfield ahead of the main body. On one hand, it replaces the strong bow shock with a system of much weaker oblique shocks. On the other hand, it encourages the separation of the flow upstream of the vehicle’s nose forming a recirculation zone that screens a considerable portion of the nose area. The combined outcome is a reduction in both drag and aeroheating. Since their introduction to the high-speed vehicles domain in the late 1940, spikes have been extensively studied. It is now a common knowledge that the performance of spikes in reducing the drag and aeroheating depends largely upon the flight conditions and the design of both the spike and the main vehicle nose. In some flight conditions and designs combinations, the flow around spiked vehicles becomes unstable. Such instability should be avoided to ensure a stable and a successful flight. In fact, the deceptively simple geometry of the spiked bodies yields a flowfield full of interesting macroscopic and microscopic details. The purpose of this talk is to survey the efforts that have be made in the field of spiked bodies aerothermodynamics and the recent contributions in this field.

Biography

Speaker
Mahmoud Military Technical College, Egypt

Abstract

Infra-Red (IR) guided missiles are a major cause of aircraft & helicopter loss, due to their passive detection & tracking, leading to fire & forget capability. Due to their portability, ease of operation, & low cost, the shoulder-fired Surface-to-Air MAN Portable Air Defense Systems (MANPADS) are lethal. Therefore, the study of aircraft susceptibility (PH = probability of hit) to IR guided missiles is important to counter this threat. This lecture will assess PH from first principles and will illustrate that the conventional criterion of PH assessment based on its Lock-on Envelop is inadequate. The Lethal Envelop is more relevant for the coming generation of IR-guided missiles, due to advancements in IR-detection technology, leading to multi-color IR-imaging. A threshold IR-signature level is the benchmark for IR signature suppression systems, to reduce PH. A typical air-to-air combat model for PH-assessment illustrates the comprehensiveness of the redefined approach.

Biography

Shripad P. Mahulikar is a Professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IIT-B). He obtained B.Tech. & integrated M.Tech. (by research) in Aerospace Engineering from IIT-Bombay in 1991 and 1992, respectively; for which, he was a DRDO-scholarship recipient. Thereafter he worked in Defense Research & Development Organization, India, as Scientist ‘B’ & ‘C’ from 1992 – 1995. He then migrated to Australia & began working as Research Associate in the Australian National University Canberra & moved to Nanyang Technological University Singapore to continue research on micro-flow, where he earned Ph.D. in 1999. He received the A. von Humboldt Fellowship (in 2003, 2007, 2009), the Outstanding Reviewer Award from the ASME Journal of Heat Transfer (in 2007), DFG-Mercator Chair Professorship in Hamburg University of Technology (Dec’2011 – Dec’2012). His work in the fields of, Infrared Signatures of Aerospace Vehicle, Aerothermal Studies in Hypersonics, Micro-Convective Heat Transfer, & Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics of Dissipative Structures, appears as 60-articles in journals in the respective fields. Recently, he is been nominated for the Finland Distinguished Professorship program for his research in, Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics of Dissipative Structures.

Speaker
Shripad P. Mahulikar Indian Institute Of Technology,Bombay

Abstract

General aviation and air transport are two wings of the civil aviation industry. Chinese air transport is developing rapidly, and has become the world second air transport system only second to US since 2005. However, Chinese civil aviation is far behind the world average level, and cannot meet requirements of economic construction and social development. The transition and structural adjustment of Chinese economy provide the general aviation with a unprecedented broad market. The prospect of general aviation is promising and anticipated. The development of general aviation industry needs the legislative supports, and the current legislative conditions of Chinese general aviation are undoubtedly far behind the realistic requirements. Accelerating the legislation in Chinese general aviation industry requires scientific legislation concept. First, Legislation must promote development of general aviation industry. The general aviation will serves as a Chinese emerging industry that boosts domestic demand, promotes employment and expedite domestic economic development. We should, based on both the concept of promoting the industrial development of general aviation and national industrial planning, enact and rectify relative laws and regulations. And we should also straighten out the relationship between aviation security and industrial development and promote the revolution of low-altitude airspace management in an all-round way, in order to improve the utilization rate of airspace resources, classify and establish airspace, simplify examination and approval procedure and intensify operation management. In addition, what we should do is to expedite the infrastructure layout construction, guide the differentiated but coordinated development of general aviation industries in various areas, establish a united supervision mechanism of general aviation, redistrict the responsibilities of Chinese Air Control Agency and set up legislation, law enforcement and judicial systems with clarified institutions, clear positioning and classified responsibilities, so as to usher in a new era of the legislative management of Chinese general aviation industry. Second, shift the focus from regulations to both regulations and services. Considering the particularity of the general aviation, we should use American practices for reference and take into account both regulation and service functions when enacting general aviation laws. For example, we should reduce administrative licensing and market supervision, and adopt “criteria” and “approval” management systems for non-commercial and commercial aviation. Furthermore, pay attention to social benefits. Complete social rescuing mechanism through legislation. It should be clarified in legislation that general aviation operators should take the responsibilities of, and ensure to realize social benefits of environmental protection and ecological balance.Finally, rise in line with international standards. Modify Chinese regulations which is inconsistent with international ones to remove barriers to international cooperation. Specify basic legislative principles. One is the principle of coordination. Realize coordination between the civil aviation and general aviation, between military aviation and civil aviation, and among departments. Two is the principle of pertinence. The general aviation has its own rules and specialties, needing to be standardized using specialized laws and regulations. Three is the principle of efficiency. To realize time and space values of general aviation, we should complete rules in aerospace openness, general aviation airport construction, general aviation operations, and regulation enforcement. Four is the principle of security. Balance the maximum use of resources of Chinese airspace and the according potential threats to Chinese national interests and social security, and establish a complete insurance system which functions as security defense and indemnificatory measure. Establish a unified legal system.Currently, the system of Chinese general aviation laws consists of national legislation, administrative laws and regulations and civil aviation regulations (CAR). Some problems exist in three components of the system, including too general content, unclear guarantee measures, incomplete implementation details, and lacking corresponding pertinence and flexibility required by general aviation regulations, stringency of operation management and standards, and uniformity of standards. A law and regulation system, centered on laws and consisting of administrative laws regulations, industrial regulations, implementation details, industrial policies and local laws and regulations, should be established. It is suggested to modify the Civil Aviation Law to make general aviation laws complete, enact the Regulations of General Aviation Development, and accelerate the establishment, modification and abolition of Chinese general aviation laws to intensify the coordination and uniformity of regulations

Biography

Speaker
Luan Shuang Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, China

Abstract

Optical design and fabrication play an ever-increasing role in our modern society as more applications for optics are developed, especially in the areas of imaging, sensing, and illumination systems. Of particular interest is the ability to utilize modern design tools to reduce cost, augment manufacturability, and enhance system performance. New materials and unprecedented capabilities to create and measure precise aspheric and freeform optical surfaces have created a whole new design space for imaging, while new computational tools have allowed more complex systems to be both designed and fabricated. These capabilities have extended to micro-optics, head-mounted displays in military aviation. Its application ranges from various kinds of optical coating such as narrow band-pass, band-reject, reflective coating, anti-reflective coating, Electromagnetic interference and electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) coating on optical surfaces, etc. to various types of optical components and mirrors used in Head-Up Display (HUD), Multifunctional Display, Standby Display Unit (SDU), Head-Mounted Display (HMD), Optical Gun Sight, Laser Designator Payload, etc. The optics in head-up display systems are used to “collimate” the HUD image so that essential flight parameters, navigational information, and guidance are superimposed on the outside world scene. Precision optical components play a key role in avionics systemsin both civil and military aviation. Its application ranges from various kinds of optical coatings such as narrow band-pass, band-reject, reflective coating, anti-reflective coating, EMI/EMC shielded coatings on optical surfaces, etc. to various types of optical components and mirrors used in Head-Up Display (HUD), Multifunctional Display, Standby Display Unit (SDU), Head-Mounted Display (HMD), Optical Gun Sight, Laser Designator Payload, etc. Older aircraft hosts many displays to show important flight data such as artificial horizon, navigation, airspeed, radar display, altitude, angle of attack, etc. presented on separate instruments panels. This arrangement of multiple displays and display formats require thepilot to scan various instruments panels to understand flight parameters and details causing split attention between the outside world and the cockpit displays. These displays were generally configured as Head down displays (HDD) needing pilot to do continual eye adjustments due to varying focus, changing brightness etc. resulting in longer reaction times, fatigue and reduced efficiency. For this reason, new generation aircrafts are built with glass cockpit hosting multitude of displays such as HUD, MFD, SDU, HMD and associated systems such as Mission Computer, Laser Designator Payload, etc. to aid pilot operations. These systems process data from a host of sensors to ahost of display systems for displaying critical flight information like altitude, airspeed, angle of attack, artificial horizon, navigation, radar display, etc. It was found that pilots using HUDs could operate their aircraft with greater precision and accuracy than they could with conventional flight instrument systems. Design of opto-avionic systemsis very challenging; be it cockpit display or the aircraft exterior and interior lights and so is its fabrication, assembly, metrology on individual component level and on the assembly level. The designs for systems like HUD and Pilot Display Unit for aircraft variants have been made on rotationally symmetric surface shapes conforming to military standards MIL-810-G for which the manufacturability issues are understood where manufacturing is performed iteratively. The optical system design has now been shifted to hybrid concept, utilizing spherical and aspheric optical components as it offers significant advantages over conventional flat and spherical surfacesby using aspheric optics, the number of components are reduced thereby reducing the weight and volume of the system and at the same time enhancing the optical efficiency and image quality of the avionic system.Typical optical specifications obtained are: Instantaneous field of view in elevation (IFOV-El): 18°-23°, IFOV (Azimuth): 20°, Convergence error: 1 mR, and Distortion: ± 1% for HUD variants using aspheric optics with reduction of weight by more than 30%. The further attempt is to use freeform mirror and optical components to reduce the size of system by an order of magnitude and to control astigmatism at multiple locations in the field of view and thus reduce wave front aberration. Considering the need for high precision in HUD optics manufacturing to improve interchangeability of components, improve quality control and longer wear/fatigue life. The deterministic optical fabrication issues in terms of optical grinding and polishing parameters to minimize surface and sub-surface damage, which may get worsened during thermal, vibration and other environmental extremities experienced by military aviation products during its service time, have been characterised and modelled for machining parameters for optical semi-automatic grinding and polishing setup for glass optics and metal and plastic substrates with diamond tuning process. The optical assembly procedure is made innovative by employing silicon gasket with suitable Jigs used for spacing lenses along with suitable lens rest mechanism coupled with nitrogen purging to withstand harsh environment of temperature and mechanical shocks experienced during aircraft operation. The flat, uniform, graded and rugate multilayer optical coatings have been designed and realized on glass substrates to get upto 75% reflection in the target wavelength region in form of single band rejection filter with central wavelength of 545 nm, bandwidth of 23 nm and total thickness of 3.25 µm for see-through displays while maintaining transmission better than 80% in other wavelength region. The anti-reflective and protective optical coatings on glass results in minimum loss of brightness and no shift in central wavelength. Controlled and deterministic freeform surfaces for LED lights reflector along with highly reflective optical coatings has resulted in focussed light in spread of 18°x13° and 10°x8° in Aircraft Taxi and Landing Modes respectively.Protective coating on outer surface ofpolycarbonate cover of Wing and Fin Navigation Lights and Taxi and Landing Lights, anti-reflective coating on inner surface and ITO coating on outside surface has made it possible to achieve harsh environmental ruggedization and electromagnetic interference and compatibility specifications.Apart from this, design of double band rejection filter with 650 layers, Central wavelength: 400, 500 nm, Bandwidth: 27 & 39 nm, Total thickness - 3.25 µm, Design of triple band rejection filter with 642 layers, Central wavelength: 400, 500 &600 nm, Bandwidth: 27, 39&49 nm, and total Thickness: 3.25 µm has been carried out.The fabrication process of depositing thin film dielectric rugate filters using ion-beam sputtering has been established.

Biography

Speaker
Vinod Karar Central Scientific Instruments Organisation (CSIR-CSIO), INDIA

Abstract

Laser drilling is a widely used non-traditional machining process, in power generation and aerospace industries, to produce components made up of high strength materials. This process is superior as compared to other traditional drilling techniques specially when drilling of aerospace components is concerned since it is capable of replicating the hole quality consistently in large quantity production because of the controlled motion and beam delivery system. However, with conventional machining it is not possible every time to get each product 100% perfect. The process efficiency, the quality of product and the operation cost are very important which entirely depend on the process parameters. Since laser drilling is concerned with the manipulation of several important process parameters (focal position, pulse duration, pulse shape, pulse energy, type of assist gas and its pressure, and laser power), it is compulsory to understand and select the appropriate parameters which will enhance the drilled hole quality and reduce the operating cost as well. Cost estimating facilitates the aerospace sector economically through the identification of critical parameters which act as key cost drivers and their relationship with cost. There is no work done in cost modelling for laser drilling. Therefore, this research will explore the manufacturing process and to obtain a parametric cost model suitable for cost engineers when defining cost for laser drilling operation. The purpose of this model is to get a clear understanding of cost relationship with process parameters by integrating cost and laser drilling process capabilities. Keywords: Laser Drilling, Process Capability, Quality, Cost Modelling, Process Parameters.

Biography

2016- Present: School of Aerospace, Transport and Manufacturing PhD Manufacturing Cranfield University (UK) 2014 – 2016 Faculty of Industrial Engineering MS Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering (First Class) CGPA 3.96/4.0 University of Engineering and Technology, Taxila (Pakistan) 2010 – 2014 Faculty of Industrial Engineering BSc Industrial Engineering (First Class) CGPA 3.84/4.0 University of Engineering and Technology, Taxila (Pakistan) CHANCELLOR’S GOLD MEDAL for Best Performance in M.Sc. Engineering Degree Programme 2014-2016 in the Faculty of Industrial Engineering SHAHBAZ SHARIF MERIT SCHOLARHIP (SSMS)-2016 for PhD in Cranfield University U.K

Speaker
Shoaib Sarfraz Cranfield University, UK

Abstract

Fires have been a serious threat yet to be comprehensively addressed in safe Air transportation. Reasons have been stated from the electrical sparking to the overheating propulsion mode and varying operating conditions. Severe hazards and loss of mankind, resources, nature, and every year huge amount of money is spent on its control as the unpredictable fire behavior paves way for transition of high potential fires. Occurrence of fire in cabin during any condition is likely to results in the severely contaminated air along with toxic gases thus posing serious health hazards. This necessitates the polluted air to be extracted quickly and safely. Appreciable safety work had been done however; the conventional duct systems are insufficient to prevent loss/ damage. Furthermore, they take-up a lot of space and often cross other services. Present work investigates feasibility of automated Ventilation jet-fan in the Aircraft to minimize fire hazards. The physical insight is drawn using systematic simulations and key controlling parameters like, HRRPUA (Heat release rate per unit area), volume flow rate, jet-fan size and location. Varying fire sizes are designed and placed at various location in an enclosure. The effectiveness of jet fan and optimum location for varying fires is analyzed. The work is motivated by the need to have better fire safety for Aviation programs.

Biography

Biography will be uploaded soon...

Speaker
Vinayak Malhotra SRM University, India

Sessions:

Abstract

Current aerospace launchers market consists of both state funded enterprises and private enterprise. Within this context the European Space Agency (ESA) has launched several initiatives in order to secure Europe’s future access to space amongst which one of the newest intiatives is represented by the micro-launcher development programme. This program aims at developing a micro-launcher with a capability of up to 50 kg to Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Besides launching satellites the micro-launchers will serve also as a technological test bed for new technologies to be validated before being implemented on larger launchers (e.g.: new guidance techniques). Romanian Space Agency (ROSA) is the main driving force behind the micro-launcher development programme with an investment of 19 million Euros over several years. Overall satellite market is outlined in our research showing several “windows” of opportunity for micro-launchers. SSL (solid-solid-liquid) configuration is discussed in detail together with the critical LOX-methane technology for the liquid stage. Several results of an internal ballistic code developed in-house are shown including erosive burn on composite solid rocket motor. These results are relevant in the context of micro-launcher development for the 1st and 2nd stage configuration. Numerical results of the internal ballistic model are compared with experimental results obtained on a test stand. Conclusions end the current research with an outline of future developments envisioned for the micro-launcher programme.

Biography

Florin Mingireanu has been for the past 10 years a research scientist specialized in propulsion at the Romanian Space Agency and is Romanian delegate at the European Space Agency – Programme Board Launchers. For the past 12 years he has been consultant for several aerospace/MoD companies working in the area of unguided/guided missiles. Florin Mingireanu holds a BSc – Physics and Astronomy from Louisiana State University and a MSc in Aerospace Engineering from Polytechnics University of Bucharest. Florin’s research interest are focused on development of solid/hybrid rocket motors, impulsive agile attitude control, development of various numerical models for interior and exterior ballistics.

Speaker
Mingireanu Florin Romanian Space Agency (ROSA),Romania

Abstract

A winglet is a device used to improve the efficiency of aircraft by lowering the lift induced drag caused by wingtip vortices. It is a vertical or angled extension at the tips of each wing. Winglets improve efficiency by diffusing the shed wingtip vortex, which in turn reduces the drag due to lift and improves the wing’s lift over drag ratio Winglets increase the effective aspect ratio of a wing without adding greatly to the structural stress and hence necessary weight of its structure. In this research, a numerical validation procedure (by FLUENT ®, computational fluid dynamics software with The Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model) is described for determination and estimation aerodynamic characteristics of three dimension subsonic rectangular wing (with NACA653218airfoil cross section). It was observed that at the present work a good agreement between the numerical study and the experimental work. This paper describes a CFD 3-dimensional winglets analysis that was performed on a Cessna wing of NACA2412 cross sectional airfoil. The wing has span 13.16 m, root chord 1.857 m, tip chord 0.928 m, sweep angle 11 degree and taper ratio 0.5. The present study shows wing without winglet and wing with winglet at cant angle 0, 30 and 45 degree. A CFD simulation performs by to compare of aerodynamics characteristics of lift coefficient CL, drag coefficient CD and lift to drag ratio, L/D lift, pathlines and pressure contours. The models run at a Mach number of 0.2 at sea level. The pressure and temperature of air at this height are 101.325 kpa and 288.2 K respectively. The resultsshow the wing with winglet can be increase lift by ratio approximately 12%. The wing with winglet can be decrease drag by ratio approximately 4%. The wing with winglet can be increase lift to drag, L/D by about 11% along different phases of flight.

Biography

Prof. Essam E.Khalil has completed his London University, Imperial College in 1977,He is professor of Energy at Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. He is AIAA Fellow, ASME Fellow and ADSHRAE Fellow. He has published more than 825 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of reputed Journals.

Speaker
Essam E. Khalil Cairo University,Egypt

Abstract

We developed a hyper loop transportation system that consists of an integrated Pod and Vacuum Tube. The Pod is propelled in the tube using a counter rotating magnetic flywheels propulsion system. The propulsion system consists of two encapsulated fly wheels;one wheel enclosed inside a hollow wheel. The two wheels are supported by electro magnetic bearings and dual shaft. The inner wheel spins at very high speed,and the outer wheel spins at lower speed for safety/balancing the wheels torques.The slower outer rotating wheel will contain the debris of the fast rotating inner wheel in case of shattering. In addition, the outer wheel is a magnetic wheel that generates levitation of the Pod to reduce the ground friction. A clutch joint connects the flywheels and the Pod to transfer the stored kinetic energy into propulsion force. The fly wheels will be charged in the vacuumed tube prior to acceleration of the Pod by stationary electric motors located at the tube entrance.An electric current through the I-beam at the tube ground surface will power the electric subsystems of breaking, sensors, navigation, etc. The Integrated Pod and tube system has the advantages of not carrying batteries/motors for powering the Pod saves weight and enhance safety of the transportation system.

Biography

ShaabanAbdallah , PhD is a professor of Aerospace Engineering Department. His research interests include Computational Fluid Mechanics (CFD), Air Breathing Propulsion Systems, Turbo machinery, and Biomedical Devices. Currently, he has been the advisor for the Hyperloop University of Cincinnati team for Space X hyperloop competition.

Speaker
Shaaban Abdallah Professor, University of Cincinnati, USA

Abstract

In this paper the results are published of post-doctorate research done at the Brazilian Aeronautics Technological Institute (ITA) in 2006. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and to discuss the operational performance of the main Brazilian carriers in the period from 2000-2005, by comparing their productivity growth and operational performance metrics with those of full service companies (FSC), regional airlines and low-fare/low-cost companies (LCC), chosen from among benchmarks in this industry. Until recently, scheduled passenger and freight services were heavily regulated in most countries in both domestic and international markets. Meanwhile, there is a consensus among air transport specialists that unnecessary restrictive regulations may have led to significant losses in efficiency. The governments of different countries, among them Brazil, have recognized this limitation and started a deregulation process in the last decade, aiming to improve efficiency and cost reductions in air transport by enhancing competition among carriers. This article is based on research undertaken for a post-doctoral research project called “Productivity Analysis of the International Air Transport Industry,” done at the Brazilian Aeronautics Technological Institute.

Biography

Dr. Antonio Araujo is a professor and researcher in the Department of Production Engineering at the State University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, teaching in undergraduate and postgraduate Industrial Engineering courses and programs. He graduated in Transport Engineering by a prestigious German University (BergischeUniversitaet Wuppertal) and concluded his doctorate at the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil in the Production Engineering area, on the theme of “Productivity in the Air Industry”, having published the thesis “Productivity analysis of the Brazilian air transportation”. He concluded in 2015 a post doctorate research on productivity of Brazilian and European ports. Dr. Araujo has 20 years of experience in the automotive industry (Mercedes-Benz, Brazil) and 5 years in the strategic planning of the aeronautical industry (EMBRAER, Brazil). He is serving as an area editor of the ‘Journal of Aerospace Technology and Management review’ (JATM).

Speaker
Antonio Henriques de Araujo Rio de Janeiro State University, Brazil

Abstract

Many regions of the world suffer from a lack of water. One of the technologies used to enhance this limted resource is cloud seeding. The Desert Research Institute (DRI) has been involved in cloud seeding research and operations since the 1960’s. Currently DRI maintains operational programs in the Eastern Sierra Nevada mountain range as well as several other locations throughout the Western US. DRI’s cloud seeding operations have traditionally used remote controlled controlled ground-based generators, which burn a solution of silver iodide, microscopic crystals which aid to freeze supercooled cloud drops and lead to the formation of ice crystals and additional snow. The benefits of the seeding program have been estimated to add 14,000 acre-feet annually to the local snowpack. Aircraft have been used to augment ground-based seeding operations; however, seeding flights can present safety risks, as the aircraft have to fly at low altitudes over the mountains within strong winter storms under icing conditions. The use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) offers the potential to expand cloud seeding operations and reduce safety risks to human life. The overarching goal of our work has been to develop the technology and operational procedures to use UAS for cloud seeding. As part of these efforts we have integrated a coud seeding payload on a UAS and conducted the first-ever test of a cloud-seeding drone, using both fixed-wing and multi-rotor aircraft. The flights to demonstrate safe long-distance operation of UAS for seeding also included the longest commercial UAS flight in US history.

Biography

Alan Gertler received his Ph.D. from UCLA, USA. He is a Research Professor in the Division of Atmospheric Sciences at the Desert Research Institute, a world leader in investigating the effects of natural and human-induced environmental change and advancing technologies aimed at assessing a changing planet. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals. Among his many honors, he was the recipient of the Hope for the Future for a Sustainable World award from the International Union of Air Pollution and Environmental Protection Associations and the Regents Researcher award from the Nevada System of Higher Education

Speaker
Alan Gertler Desert Research Institute,US

Abstract

The future of aeronautics looks promising due to the steady increase of airline passengers even taking in account the existence of Internet or any other mean of communications. But the need of industrial competitiveness, social responsibility and ecological requirements requires to this mean of transportation to become greener, faster, quieter and these three objectives are very challenging. To accomplish them aircraft builders companies need to search in two different directions 1) Apply the most cutting edge technologies that allow aircrafts to be lighter and therefore less fuel consuming. 2) Look for innovative designs that improve the performance of current airplanes whose shape has not been modified since many decades before. In this regard not only subsonic planes but also hypersonic planes need to be taken in mind as the latter would be able to fly extra long routes with a suitable duration of the flight.

Biography

Santiago Hernandez is Associate Fellow of AIAA and Full Professor of Structural Engineering in the University of Coruna (Spain). He is the founder and person in charge of two wind tunnels in his university and has written three books on structural optimization and aeroelasticity. He has collaborated since many years ago with NASA and also with AIRBUS in the A380, A350, A340 and A30X aircrafts on topics of non-linear analysis, structural optimization and linear and non-linear dynamics. He is also the Director of the Master on Structures and Materials for Aerospace Engineering in his university. Prof. Hernandez has given numerous conferences and short courses in many countries on topics of aircraft design, aeroelasticity and multidisciplinary optimization.

Speaker
Santiago Hernandez University of Coruna, Spain

Abstract

The synergistic integration of smart materials, structures, machines, sensors, actuators, and control electronics can transform conventional passive structures and machines to active, adaptive, and “smart” structronic (structure + electronic) or mechatronic systems with inherent self-sensing, diagnosis, actuation and control capabilities. Research and development of the emerging technology of smart structures and structronic systems have been evolving for about three decades. Sophisticated multi-field/control coupling and multi-physics theories have been developed and numerous practical applications have also been proposed. This report focuses on histories, smart materials (e.g., piezoelectrics, electro-/magneto-/photostrictive materials, shape memory materials, electroand magneto-rheological fluids, polyelectrolyte gels, pyroelectric materials, magneto-optical materials, superconductors, etc.), precision devices (sensors and actuators), micro-/nano-actuations, smart structures, mechatronic and structronic systems, and photothermo- electro-magneto-mechanical systems encompassing elastic, temperature, electric, magnetic, light, and control interactions. Designs are emphasized; modern research issues are also discussed.

Biography

Hornsen (HS) TZOU is the Director of Interdisciplinary Research Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics in College of Aerospace Engineering at Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics (09/2015-…), the 1st--round National Professor and Fellow of the Thousand-Talent Program of China, an ASME Fellow (1996), and a Chair-Professor (03/2016-…) at Zhejiang University. He joined Zhejiang University (09/2009-12/2015) after nearly 30-year service at the University of Kentucky (UK) (Dept. of Mechanical Engineering). He earned his M.S. and Ph.D. from the School of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University in 1979 and 1983 respectively. He was among the pioneers in “smart structures and structronic systems.” His research and teaching interests encompass smart structures and structronic systems, hybrid multi-functional photo/flexo/megneto/electro/elastic structures, precision mechatronics, design and micro-actuation of biomedical devices and tools, dynamics and distributed sensing/control of discrete and distributed systems (shells, plates, etc.), nonlinear joint/contact dynamics and control, electromechanics, opto-thermopiezoelectric devices and systems, etc. He was invited and worked at the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) (Kanagawa, Japan), Tohoku University (Sendai, Japan), the Otto-von-Guericke University of Magdeburg and German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) (Braunschweig, Germany), Amway Research R&D (IRI/ASEE Fellow, 1988), Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan) (2001 Chair of International Cooperation), NASA Levis, Harbin Institute of Technology (China), National Taiwan University (NSC Chair Professor,2006-07), etc. He directed the StrucTronics and Design Lab (founded by NSF, JPL, ARO, NASA, AFOSR, Pratt-Whitney, IBM, Ford, industries, etc. since 1985) at UK and also worked at IBM (CAD/CAM and Printer R&D) and Wright Laboratory (Flight Dynamics Lab). Dr. Tzou has won six paper awards (including ASME and AIAA Best-Paper Awards) and three NASA Class-1 New Technology Disclosure Awards (2001, 2003 and 2009). He has authored and co-authored several research monographs and over 500 technical publications and was named “One of the Most Cited Authors,” by the Journal of Sound of Vibration in 11/2006; “2011 top-ten cited paper” in Journal of Intelligent Material Systems and Structures and Elsevier 2014/2016 one of “the most cited researchers in Mechanical Engineering” in China. He authored Piezoelectric Shells (Distributed Sensing and Control of Continua) and Design of Smart Structures, Devices and Structronic Systems and edited six other books. He was a founding member of the ASME Adaptive Structures and Material Systems Committee, the General Chair of the 2007 ASME International Design Technical Conferences and Computers & Information in Engineering Conference (IDETC/CIE), Conference Chair of the 21st Mechanical Vibration and Sound Conference, Co-chair of the 23 International Conference on Adaptive Structures Technologies, Chair of ASME Board on Technical Knowledge Dissemination (BTKD), Executive Member of ASME Technical Communities Operating Board (TCOB) and Chair of ASME Interdisciplinary Councils.

Speaker
Hornsen Tzou Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, China

Abstract

A large technogeneous or space catastrophe, as a rule, is known to accompanied by the initiation of mass fires. In connection with the estimate of ecological and climatic impacts of severe forest fires, the prediction of the process influence on forest phytosenoses and ground layer state of the atmosphere is of interest. The objective of the present research is to define dimensions of the ignition zone and to study photochemical processes, which are taking place. Common laws of conservation for multiphase medium are used to describe heat - mass transfer processes in a volume with forest vegetation and celestial flight stage. Setting up and numerical solutions of problems of the vegetation ignition when meteorites fall and during air explosions in the atmosphere of the Earth were carried out. When the celestial body was flying a fraction of its kinetic energy was transformed into radiation and the heating of Earth surface and forest phytocenoces was took place. The radiant energy was reached vegetation cover and it caused the heating forest fuels, evaporation of moisture and subsequent thermal decomposition of solid material, with evaporating solid pyrolysis products liberation. The last material is burning in the atmosphere and interacting with the oxygen of air owing to the gravity available, heating volumes of air begin ascending. In so doing, contours derived for collision catastrophes look like a circle arc in the neighborhood of epicenter of the explosion, and take the form of an ellipse extended in the flight trajectory projection direction of Tunguska celestial body. The size and contour of the domain of forest combustible materials ignition as a result of Tunguska meteorite explosion are qualitatively and quantitatively coincide with numerical calculation results.

Biography

Valeriy Perminov studied for master degree in mathematics at the Kemerovo State University, Russia. Then he graduated at the Tomsk State University and was awarded a PhD for research on modelling of forest fires. Worked as associate professor in mechanics of fluid and gas at the Tomsk State University. In 20111 he was awarded a degree of doctor of physical and mathematical sciences. He moved to the Tomsk Polytechnic University (Department of Ecology and Basic Safety) in 2012 to a position as Professor. His career was a series of research projects on the applications of these methods for mathematical modeling of forest fires and environmental pollution: the study of the conjugate problems of continuum reactive multiphase media mechanics, environment pollution, the mechanism and limiting conditions of forest fire spread, mathematical modeling and heat and mass transfer of gas dynamics at the natural and technogenic catastrophes(mathematical prediction of the ecological consequences of the natural and technogenic catastrophes (initiation and spread of the mass forest fires, ignition of forest massifs by radiant energy as a result of nuclear bursts and Tunguska celestial body fall, the recurring radioactive contamination from forest fires). This research theme has been very fruitful and highly collaborative, involving extensive interactions with Russian Foundation for Basic Research, International Science Foundation, Moscow State University and etc. He has published more than 100 papers in different issues and has been serving as a member of editorial board of International Journal of Geomate. He has taken part in different all Russian and international conferences devoted to the problems of transfer processes, forest fires and ecology.

Speaker
Valeriy Perminov Tomsk Polytechnic University, Russia

Abstract

Fire starts with smoldering before transforming into the flames which necessitates the need to fundamentally understand the smoldering. Almost all of the combustion processes are accompanied by sound which significantly affects its progression. The thermoacoustic interaction are likely to alter the forward heat transfer with varying symmetry and sound wave frequency. The maximum acoustic effect is noted to vary with the sound source distance from the ignition front however, the acoustic effect coupled with external heat source is an aspect yet to be explored. The present work represents a practical case where combustion phenomenon is accompanied with external heating. The work attempts to gain physical insight into heterogenous nature of acoustic thermal energy interaction in presence of an external heat source and related implication on smoldering. An experimental setup was upraised and experiments were carried out on incense sticks with systematic variation of sound frequency, distance between the fuel and sound source, symmetry of the sound source with the fuel and in presence of external heat source. The sound waves were impinged onto the reaction front from diametrically opposite directions and related sound source symmetry. Results indicates that sound significantly affects smoldering and may lead to flaming combustion. The work is motivated by the need to have better fire safety with faster transition into flaming results in less production of toxic products (gases) minimizing hazards. The results can be effectively applied to terrestrial and space applications.

Biography

Biography will be uploaded soon...

Speaker
Vinayak Malhotra SRM University, India

Abstract

Novel UAV aerodynamic technologies emphasizeairflow control and flapless designs that replace traditional hinged control surfaces and achieve enhanced manoeuvrability, lighter wing structures, and improved stealth. Advances in blended wing–body (BWB) airframe design and flapless flow control mechanisms take advantage of modified delta designs in which pitch and roll control is achieved using fluidic flight controls over Coandă surfaces. The RQ‐3 DarkStar high‐altitude surveillance UAV has a distinctive flying‐saucer fuselage shape and slightly forward‐swept rectangular wings that require a compromise between aerodynamic efficiency and stealth constraints for low detectability in heavily guarded airspace. The vehicle’s lifting body sheds a leading‐edge vortex and experiences flow separation at the wing‐root region at high angles of attack that was alleviated using CFD analysis.Canard UAV configurations offer the advantages ofincreased maximum lift coefficient and reduced trim drag which are desirable for high‐altitude long‐endurance (HALE) UAVs. Nonetheless, canard aircraft exhibit complex, strongly‐coupled aerodynamic flow fields, vortex–vortex interactions, and vortex–surface interactions which necessitate careful design and extensive testing of aerodynamics and flight dynamics behaviors in different flight regimes. Tailless delta‐wing UCAVs present unique aerodynamic characteristics; the primary aerodynamic flow is typically dominated by the formation of leading-edge vortex patterns. Secondary and tertiary vortex formations often occur. The vortices eventually break down at very high angles of attack.However, modification and control of the flow structure over UCAV configurations can be achieved using plasma actuation. This review focuses on the unique aerodynamics properties and flight dynamics of UAV configurations.

Biography

Dr. Pascual Marques is President at Marques Aviation Ltd - UK, International Director (UK) of Unmanned Vehicle University, and President at Oxford Aerospace Academy - UK. He received his MPhil from Brunel University and his PhD from Liverpool John Moores University. Dr. Marqués oversees the design, R&D, and manufacturing of the MA THOR unmanned aircraft series at Marques Aviation Ltd..His research interests are in the fields of Aerodynamics at low Reynolds numbers and Flight Stability.Dr. Marqués is the Editor-in- Chief of the International Journal of Unmanned Systems Engineering (IJUSEng).

Speaker
Pascual Marques Marques Aviation Ltd., United Kingdom

Abstract

In order to promote safety in the aviation and airline industry , all begain with training and as I do instruct from about 11 years till now , I do try always to see what is the most important , I found that combining the operational and maintenance objectives always in the whole training process , as training in our airline industry are based on bulk papers and always speak to the individual himself only , for the pilot , how you will opearte , to the maintenance, how you will maintain , and that is not very good , so I do try to combine both in a project which I call the SSS project , System from a Senario using a Story telling process , where I do use it in my training sessions for the recurrent and refreshing training process, and the results was magnificent, staff who operate and maintain love it and love the idea that I put them in the shoes of the others , as the aircraft in order to fly safely , it is the combined work between all the staff in order to commence flying , training must go to a state of the art ways, must be simple , animated and captivated and that was my work .

Biography

A Motivated technical instructor , Currently senior Airframe & Power plant engineer (Technical instructor) for Egyptair training academy with 11years of experience within the aviation and airline industry , responsible for providing basic, initial, transition & recurrent courses for Pilots, Engineers, technicians & cabin crews . Personal strengths include a high numerate and analytical capability, combined with strong interpersonal and presentation skills, Demonstrates a broader business understanding.

Speaker
Haytham aly Egyptair Training Academy, Egypt

Abstract

In this paper we will analyze and simulate the launching stage of Target UAV using 6-DoF nonlinear equation of motion [1]. The aerodynamic and booster mathematical models are studied and Matlab-function is created to estimate the aerodynamics characteristic of the vehicle. In order to simulate the launching stage, the booster thrust is modeled during the launching; an investigation carried out to obtain the optimum launch angle for the dummy flight test model and found to be 20 deg. The purpose of this paper is to develop a code to simulate the nonlinear dynamic behavior of the Target UAV during launching stage. This is required in order to minimize the total number of dummy flight tests. In this regard, the nonlinear 6-DoF dynamic model of the UAV is utilized. Simulation is a very important means that can provide very accurate data about the vehicle flight behavior in the computer environment. In this regard, the design costs will be decreased by decreasing the number of flight tests. It also gives a good view about the design, vehicle performance and stability behavior. The other important aspect of the simulation is that one can provide a model that has the more similarity with the real vehicle through the flight and thus can predict what would happen during the real situations. The launching stage is very important phase. This flight simulation emphasized to analyzed launching behavior for the dummy flight test model, considering no any thrust force from the engine, only booster force is applied during the specified time for this booster. In this report the launch stage of the dummy flight test model is simulated using nonlinear equation of motion. For dummy model, the engine is not installed, so the booster thrust is applied in certain duration ( booster t=1.7615 sec), then the booster will be released after this time.

Biography

YASIR has completed his BSc from SUDAN University. He is the director of flight mechanic in ARDC SUDAN. He has published more than 2 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
YASIR ARAFAT MOHAMMED ELHASSAN Aeronautical Research and Development Center, SUDAN

Abstract

Aerospace Industry has evolved over the last century and is growing by approaching towards, more fuel efficient, cheaper, simpler and convenient ways of flight stages along with its safety factors. In this paper, the accident records of aircrafts are studied and found about 71% of accidents caused on runways during Take-Off and Landing. By introducing the concept of interpreting electromagnetism, the cause of bounced touchdown and flare failure such as landing impact loads and instability could be eliminated and land smoothly and shortly. During Take-Off the rate of fuel consumption is observed to be maximum. By applying concept of interpreting electromagnetism, a remarkable rate of fuel consumption is reduced to 5% to 60%, which can be used in case of emergency due to lack of fuel or in case of extended flight. A complete setup of the concept, its effects and characteristics are studied and provided with references of few popular aircrafts. By embedding series of strong and controlled electromagnets below the runway along and aside the center line and fixed in the line of acting force through wing-fuselage aerodynamic center. By the essence of its strength controllable nature, it can contribute to performance and fuel efficiency for aircraft. This ensures a perfect Take-Off with less fuel consumption followed by safe cruise stage, which in turn ensures a short and safe landing, eliminating the till known failures, due to bounced touchdowns and flare failure.

Biography

Sambit Supriya Dash is doing his under graduation in Aerospace Engineering from SRM University. He is good in academics and sports. He has secured Gold medal in reputed Research Day conference in SRM University has been serving science by contributing projects and experiments.

Speaker
Sambit Supriya Dash SRM University, India

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