Scientific Program

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Dusan Berek, Prof, PhD, DSc Employed at Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences in Bratislava. Served as elected member of the Presidium of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, President of the Slovak Chemical Society, Chairman of the Czecho-Slovak and Slovak National Committee of Chemistry for IUPAC. Corresponding member of the Central European Academy of Sciences and member of the Learned Society of the Slovak Academy of Sciences. Author or co-author of two monographs and 300+ scientific papers in extenso published in refereed periodicals, proceedings and chapters of books, as well as 60+ patents (four of them were licensed) - cited more than 3,000x. Presented over 130 invited plenary, key and main lectures, as well as over 900 regular lectures and poster contributions on symposia and conferences, as well as during lecturing tours to over fourty countries. Elected „Slovak scientist of the year 1999“, and „Slovak innovator of the year 2002“.

Biography

Dusan Berek, Prof, PhD, DSc Employed at Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences in Bratislava. Served as elected member of the Presidium of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, President of the Slovak Chemical Society, Chairman of the Czecho-Slovak and Slovak National Committee of Chemistry for IUPAC. Corresponding member of the Central European Academy of Sciences and member of the Learned Society of the Slovak Academy of Sciences. Author or co-author of two monographs and 300+ scientific papers in extenso published in refereed periodicals, proceedings and chapters of books, as well as 60+ patents (four of them were licensed) - cited more than 3,000x. Presented over 130 invited plenary, key and main lectures, as well as over 900 regular lectures and poster contributions on symposia and conferences, as well as during lecturing tours to over fourty countries. Elected „Slovak scientist of the year 1999“, and „Slovak innovator of the year 2002“.

Speaker
Prof .Dusan Berek / Institute of Polymers SAV ,SLOVAKIA

Abstract

Rapid depletion of non-renewable fossil resources is posing an imminent threat to the energy and supply of fine chemicals that are vital to the global economy. Conversion of Biomass to value added chemicals has been on the forefront of strategies that are focused on eliminating our dependence on non-renewable resources such as coal and petroleum. Studies in the last two decades have resulted in the efficient conversion of corn to ethanol, at the same time escalating the corn prices beyond the reach of poor. In our research we have shifted our focus to the utilization of wasted biomass which does not interfere with the human or animal food chain. Use of sugar cane bagasse, switch grass, corn stover and wood from natural forests has been contemplated for bio-mass conversion to renewable fuels/chemicals. In this context, there exists a dire need to develop novel analytical separation methods and cost-effective materials to increase the efficiency of the conversion processes. For the conversion we have designed and developed novel catalytic materials with the efficiencies superior to those that currently exist. We have conducted the research in several phases in which the biomass is pretreated and the cellulose component has been separated from the lignin using mild and non-corrosive acids. The cellulose is subsequently converted to sugars which are broken down to glucose and fructose. Dehydration of sugars to hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) is achieved by a novel catalyst featuring both Lewis and Bronstead acid sites. The presentation will summarize the importance of analytical techniques in the determination/separation of various products and opportunities for exploring inorganic materials for the production of value added chemicals and fuels. .

Biography

Dr. Ramanujachary has completed his PhD from Indian Institute of Technology, and postdoctoral studies from Rutgers University, NJ, University, USA. He is currently working as a professor at the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Rowan University. He has published more than 220 papers in reputed journals and holds several patents.

Speaker
Kandalam V Ramanujachary / Rowan University, USA

Abstract

Interaction of metal complexes containing multi-dentate aromatic chiral molecules with DNA has gained a lot of attention, due to their possible application as therapeutic agents; i.e., potential probes of DNA structure and conformation. Cisplatin is one of the best known complexes used as anticancer agents. A necessary prerequisite for an active Pt-drug seems to be cis-coordinated by bidentate amine or two amine ligands and two leaving groups with an intermediate binding strength (e.g. Cl-) to Pt(II). Upon entering the cell, Cl- dissociates from the molecule to leave a reactive complex which can react with water, reacting with DNA forming inter- and intra-strand and DNA crosslink (leads to the local denaturation of DNA chain). Carboplatin is a second generation analogue of cisplatin, has low toxic side effects for the same efficiency, while the third generation includes compounds that contain different types of chiral amines. Trans isomer trans-l (trans-(–)-1R,2R) shows high efficacy than the corresponding trans-d- (trans-(+)-1S,2S) and the cis-isomer (1R,2S). This study is aimed to develop new transition metal complexes with S and R-enationmetic ligands containing N,N- and N,O- donors, in absence and presence of N,N- or P-aromatic donors. In vitro anticancer activity of the complexes were evaluated against human breast cancer (MDA-MB231) and ovarian cancer (OVCAR-8) cell lines. Moreover, the interaction of the complexes with CT-DNA was discussed using CD and UV-visible spectroscopy. The enantioselective complex–DNA binding furnish direct information on how the DNA helix and enantiomeric complexes interact. The results indicate intercalative complexes CT-DNA binding capabilities.

Biography

Prof. Sahar I. Mostafa Inorganic Chemistry professor Mansoura University, Egypt; Visiting Prof. McGill, Canada; Ioannina Univ, Greece. She was awarded B Sc (Excellent honor) and M Sc (Mansoura Univ) and Ph D (Imperial College, UK) and Academic Visitor Imperial College, IKY Fellow, JICA fellow. She has written chapters, invited for 32 lectures worldwide, 75 publications, member in editorial boards in scientific journals, advisor (35 MSc , PhD theses). Her academic efforts have been recognized by Mansoura Univ (2013, 2017, 2018; best Teaching-1992), JICA (2000), Imperial College (2008), Who’s is Who’s in the world (2008), Al-AzharUniv (2007, 2009, 2011), Africa Pharmacology (South Africa 2016).

Speaker
Sahar I. Mostafa / Mansoura University, Egypt

Abstract

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) constitutes a powerful analytical tool to study molecular recognition processes. Amongst those, NMR has proved very useful in determining at the molecular level the structures of the complexes formed by the analytes (the selectands) and chiral selectors in capillary electrophoresis (CE) runs. In combination with other experimental and theoretical techniques, NMR sheds light on the fine details of non-covalent interactions upon which enantiomer separations may rest. Of particular interest in pharmacological and food analysis, the reversal of the order of migration of the enantiomers (EMO reversal) in CE can be explained by subtle, minor changes in the structure of the selector-selectand complexes. In this talk, some representative, recent examples of how NMR can assist in the understanding of those fine structural details in enantiomer separations by CE will be presented. These results are complemented by MD simulations, by which total interaction energies between enantiomers and the chiral selector can be estimated.

Biography

Antonio Salgado (Girona, Spain, 1962)graduated in Organic Chemistry at the Faculty of Chemistry, University of Barcelona, where he also did his MSc thesis. He completed his PhDat theQueen Mary and Westfield College(University of London) in 1993. After taking several positions at some universities and public research centers, he became NMR manager at the CERMN in the University of Alcalá (Madrid, Spain) in October 2015. He is author of more than 50 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Antonio Salgado Serrano / University of Alcala, Spain

Sessions:

Scientific Sessions

Abstract

Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is well suited for the analysis of analytes in an aqueous solution. But it is not easy to analyze a solid sample with CE since labor-intensive sample pretreatment processes are required. To analyze solid surface samples efficiently, commercial liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) devices have been introduced. By forming a liquid microjunction on a sample surface using a plastic tip mounted on a robotic arm, analytes on the surface are extracted and analyzed by nanoelectrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. We have demonstrated in-line coupling of LESA with CE by forming a liquid microjunction between a sample surface and the inlet of a separation capillary without using a robotic arm. Since previous LESA-CE was based on a homemade CE set up, the times needed for forming a liquid microjunction and injecting the extract by gravity were very long (about 30 min). Here we present automated LESA-CE using a commercial CE instrument. The liquid handling time was shortened to few minutes and the LESA processes were more reliable. Three pesticides, chlorantraniliprole (C), kresoxim-methyl (K), and pyraclostrobin (P) on the surface of a spring-loaded sample plate in the inlet vial were directly extracted to a liquid microjunction formed at the capillary inlet tip. After extraction, the extract was injected into the capillary. For these water-insoluble neutral analytes, micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) combined with an on-line sample stacking method, analyte focusing by micelle collapse (AFMC) was employed. The limits of detection obtained with LESA-AFMC-MEKC were 220 (C), 90 (K), and 140 (P) ppb, much lower than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency limits of 1.2 (C), 0.5 (K), and 1.5 (P) ppm for apples. Thus our automated LESA-CE is a simple and sensitive method without sample pretreatment processes required for conventional methods.

Biography

Speaker
Doo Soo Chung / Seoul National University,Korea (South)

Abstract

Bisphosphonates are characterized by [P-(R1)C(R2)-P] structure, they are class of drugs that slow down or prevent bone loss. They inhibit osteoclasts (responsible for bone resorption), and allow osteoblasts (bone building cells) to be more effective; i.e., improving the bone mass. Moreover, Bps are considered as anticancer drugs that cause bone damage. Since nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates inhibit the mevalonate pathway in osteoclasts and macrophage, the new platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes with sodium alendronate in absence and presence of N,N-chelates, trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane, 2-aminopyrimidine, 2,2’-bipyridyl have been synthesised. Their composition and stability constants have been determined using Jobs’ method. Their anticancer activity were tested against the human prostate (DU 145) and breast (MDA-MB231) cancer cell lines compared to the market drug cisplatin. The interaction of these complexes with CT-DNA has been evaluated using UV-visible spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. In vitro release of [Pd2(bpy)2(Ald-2H)] from HAnp were evaluated using UV-visible spectroscopy. The [Pd2(bpy)2(Ald-2H)] encapsulation efficiency was found to be 96.83%, while the released 85.2 up to 10 days at the physiological pH 7.4.Finally, in a preliminary investigation, the in vivo anti-osteoporosisof these complexes has been evaluated against a panel of Dawley albino rats. Keywords:Sodium alendronate, complexes, anti-osteoporosis, DNA-interaction, albino rats Structure of alendronic acid (a) and Alendronate (NaHAld) (b) References [1] A. E. Fathy, I. S. Butler, M. Abd El Rahman, B. J. Jean Claude, S. I. Mostafa, Inorg. Chim. Acta, 473 (2018) 44-50. [2] A. A. Shabana, I. S. Butler, D. F.R. Gilson, B. J. Jean-Claude, Z. S. Mouhri, M. M. Mostafa, S. I. Mostafa, Inorg. Chim. Acta, 423 (2014) 242-255. [3] F. M. Ibrahim, Y. M. El Hawary, I. S. Butler, S. I. Mostafa, International Journal of Polymeric Materials and Polymeric Biomaterials, 63 (2014) 846–858 Jobs method for the molar ratios UV-Visible titration of CT-DNA with of alendronate complexes [Pd2(Ald)2(HAld)Cl(H2O)]

Biography

Professor of Inorganic Chemistry, Mansoura University, Egypt; Visiting Prof. McGill, Canada; Ioannina Univ, Greece. She was awarded B Sc (Excellent honor) and M Sc (Mansoura Univ) and Ph D (Imperial College, UK) and Academic Visitor Imperial College, IKY Fellow, JICA fellow. She has written chapters, invited for 32 lectures worldwide, 75 publications, member in editorial boards in scientific journals, advisor (35 MSc , PhD theses). Her academic efforts have been recognized by Mansoura Univ (2013, 2017, 2018; best Teaching-1992), JICA (2000), Imperial College (2008), Who’s is Who’s in the world (2008), Al-AzharUniv (2007, 2009, 2011), Africa Pharmacology (South Africa 2016).

Speaker
Sahar I. Mostafa / Mansoura University, Egypt

Abstract

Counterfeit medicines are a worldwide problem but with regional variations focused on different disease states. The occurrence of counterfeits ranges from 1-2%in the UK to 30-40% in some African countries.According to the WHO counterfeits medicinesshould now be classified as either a substandard or a falsified medicine. The different analytical approaches to identifying counterfeit medicines are discussed in terms of instrumental complexity and analysis time. The usability of the different systems under real world conditions are discussed and lead to the potential of Raman and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) FT/IR techniques to provide rapid analyses of suspect tablet formulations.Raman analyses can be carried out on whole tablets whereas ATR FT/IR methods require only that the tablet be crushed prior to analysis. Both methods provide a considerable time saving over the solvent extraction protocols used by the British Pharmacopoeia. Standard spectra of API plus excipients, from crushed tablets, were recorded for identification purposes and quantitative data was obtained from spectra of calibrated mixtures of the API and excipients. The APIs studied include paracetamol, atenolol and antimalarialswith a range of different excipients. Tablet samples from various countries includingChina, India, Nigeria, Kenya, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and the UK were examined. Initial results showed the API could be identified down to ca 5% w/w of the tablet. Quantification based on (ATR) FT/IR was linear with selected characteristic peak areas for each API/excipient mixture. The analysis of the tablet samples generally showed good agreement with expectation but there were considerable discrepancies in the levels of API in the atenolol tablets. This was confirmed by conventional extractive analyses. ATR FT/IR can therefore identify counterfeit tablets rapidly without the need for solvents. Whilst LC MS/MS and NMR techniques may be the ‘gold standards’ of the analytical world they are of much reduced value in sub-Saharan African countries whereas a portable Raman and ATR FT/IR instruments may prevent the use of counterfeit tablets which impact on patient health and contribute to the increase in drug resistant species.

Biography

Graham Lawson’s expertise is instrumental analysis, in disparate areas such as environmental exposure in the polymer industry, the identification of migrants from food packaging and factors influencing drug delivery in clinical applications. The unifying themes are the detection of ultra low levels of contamination and the protection of people from adverse exposures. He was co-opted onto a NATO special studies group on the stand-off detection of radiation. His current research interests include novel analytical techniques applied to blood spot analyses and to counterfeit drug detection.

Speaker
Graham Lawson / De Montfort University, United Kingdom

Abstract

Background Evidence suggests that ˃50% of cardiovascular (CVD) disease patients do not adhere to their prescribed medication. This negatively affects patient health, increases healthcare costs and medicines wastage. DBS microsampling combined with LC-ToF MS detection offersa simple means to monitor drug levels to enable clinicians to personalise optimum treatment for patients.In this research Whatman 903 dried blood spot (DBS) sample collection cardsare compared with volumetric absorptive micro-sampling (VAMS)technology for use as a personal sampling methodology. Methods A liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry(LC-HRMS) method was validated for the determination of 10selected cardiovascular drugs.For the preparation of DBS and VAMS calibration samples whole blood was spiked with different levels of the 10 target analytes. 8mm DBS discs or the absorptive VAMS tips were extracted with methanol containing the internal standard. The bioanalytical method was applied to samples taken from adult volunteers, from both the UK and Iraq, some of whom were prescribed one or more of the target drugs. Volunteers not prescribed drugs represented blank samples. Results Approximately 17% of the spots were unacceptable for quantification whereas only1 VAMS sample tip was rejected due to incomplete collection.Validation showed comparable results between the DBS and VAMS microsampling methods for the quantification of the 10 target drugs. For two study groups the cardiovascular drug levels detected suggested 83% adherence for the pre-warned group and a reduction to 73% adherence for the trial group. Adherence was not uniform amongst the cardiovascular drugs monitored. All volunteers found the VAMS methodology preferable. Conclusions Both micro-sampling methods coupled with LC-HRMS analyses were able to identify patients where the prescription apparently failed to produce detectable drug levels in the blood. This information should inform clinicians how to proceed in the healthcare process in the event of poor patient progress. Keywords Dried blood spot (DBS); Volumetric Absorptive Micro-sampling (VAMS); LC-HRMS; medication adherence

Biography

Sangeeta Tanna is a Reader in Pharmaceutical Bioanalysis in the Leicester School of Pharmacy at De Montfort University. Her expertise and research interests lie in the bioanalysis and drug delivery fields. This has led to the development of micro-analytical methodologies for the determination of therapeutic drugs from dried blood spots (DBS) based on LC-MS and LC-MS/MS studies for a range of clinical applications. This research was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry Analytical Methods Prize in 2010. Applications of this work to patient care include improved medication for babies and to people with cardiovascular diseases.

Speaker
Sangeeta Tanna / De Montfort University, United Kingdom

Abstract

Liquid chromatography, LC, provides information on both average values and distributions of molecular characteristics of synthetic polymers, their molar mass, chemical structure and physical architecture. Gel permeation (size exclusion) chromatography, GPC/SEC, is commonly employed for determination of polymer molar mass. Its basic retention mechanism is steric exclusion, controlled by the changes of conformational entropy of coiled macromolecules entering the pores of the column packing. However, GPC/SEC cannot give actual information about a polymer when two molecular characteristics are changed simultaneously - as in copolymers or in polymer blends. In this case, the entropic retention mechanism is to be coupled with the enthalpic retention mechanisms. The ambition is to suppress molar mass effects so that polymer separation depends exclusively on other molecular characteristic. The most common enthalpic retention mechanism employed in coupled LC methods is adsorption, the distribution of a solute between a volume of its solution and a surface of column packing. It is mostly controlled by eluent polarity. The appropriate stationary phase is bare silica gel. Another LC retention mechanism is absorption (enthapic partition), the distribution of a solute between the volumes of mobile and stationary phase. The practically applicable volume of LC stationary phase is created by the chemically attached appropriate groups, usually C18 alkyls on a carrier, mainly silica gel. Both adsorption and enthalpic partition retention mechanisms are performed either isocratically or with a mobile phase gradient. Direct practical employment of the third enthalpic retention mechanism, polymer phase separation is rather difficult. Sample is precipitated on the colum inlet and then gradually dissolved and eluted. However, solubility of polymers strongly depends on their molar mass so that the molar mass effect is difficult to suppress. Considering the enthalpy-based processes in a LC column it should be remembered that they are all accompanied with large changes of conformational entropy of macromolecules.

Biography

Dusan Berek, Prof, PhD, DSc Employed at Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences in Bratislava. Served as elected member of the Presidium of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, President of the Slovak Chemical Society, Chairman of the Czecho-Slovak and Slovak National Committee of Chemistry for IUPAC. Corresponding member of the Central European Academy of Sciences and member of the Learned Society of the Slovak Academy of Sciences. Author or co-author of two monographs and 300+ scientific papers in extenso published in refereed periodicals, proceedings and chapters of books, as well as 60+ patents (four of them were licensed) - cited more than 3,000x. Presented over 130 invited plenary, key and main lectures, as well as over 900 regular lectures and poster contributions on symposia and conferences, as well as during lecturing tours to over fourty countries. Elected „Slovak scientist of the year 1999“, and „Slovak innovator of the year 2002“.

Speaker
Dusan Berek / Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Slovakia

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which comprise of the two major clinical subtypes, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are relapsing systemic inflammatory diseases, mainly affecting the gastrointestinal tract with extraintestinal manifestations and associated immune disorders. Both subtypes are characterized by unpredictable course, with periods of flare-ups and remissions suggesting poor adherence to medical therapy. Immunosuppressants, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine and 6-thioguanine, are the most prescribed drug class in IBD treatment as steroid-sparing therapy, effective in maintaining remission. The inflammatory process along the digestive tract disrupts absorption of vitamins; thus, the additional supplementation of IBD patients with vitamins is recommended. Moreover, low folate intake has been associated with tumor growth in IBD. Consequently, a number of IBD patients take folic acid with imunosuppressive drugs. Still, fixed-dose combinations of IBD drugs and folic acid are not available on market. Therefore, the development of such formulation, as well as analytical support for quality control investigation, is of exceptional importance. Investigation of ADME properties is an integral part of novel drug and formulation development. In silico approach, a fast developing technique for ADME prediction, has been used to give insight into compatibility of APIs in proposed fixed-dose combinations. Furthermore, chromatography (C18-HPLC and IAM-HPLC) has been successfully used in ADME modeling. Finally, a fast and reliable HPLC/DAD/MSn method for simultaneous determination of all APIs has been developed and validated. Various combinations of commonly used excipients were tested in the formulation optimization. The proposed method has been applied for analysis of commercially available products and proposed fixed-dose combinations.

Biography

Associate Professor Ana Mornar has completed her PhD in 2007 at Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Zagreb, Croatia. She is the Vice-dean for students and study programmes at the Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Zagreb. She has published more than 40 scientific papers in reputed journals and 4 book chapters. She was invited to lecture at several international conferences. She is the principal investigator on projects founded by Croatian Science Foundation (project ID: UIP-2017-05-3949) and Adris Foundation. Her scientific interests include chromatographic techniques, mass spectrometry, pharmaceutical analysis and bioanalytics.

Speaker
Ana Mornar / University of Zagreb , Croatia (Hrvatska)

Abstract

The Islands of the Caribbean are unique Ain that they are located at the meeting point of many Atlantic oceanic currents. Oceanic currents from West Africa, South America and Western Europe, which makes its way into the waters of the Caribbean, bringing with it various forms of pollutants including various heavy metals. Internally, the region suffers from the typical ailments of developing nations including a lack of environmental regulations and poor enforcement of existing environmental laws combined with a need for rapid industrialization and limited funds.The marine environment and ecosystem, and by extension, human health are the usual victims. The region’s dependence on the health of its marine environment cannot be understated as the region’s consumption of seafood is among the highest in the world and seafood exports contribute significantly to the islands economies. Historically, research on trace elemental analyses of the marine environment is sadly lacking due to factors such as a lack of funding, dated equipment, and poor infrastructure. andmHowever, in spite of these challenges, emerging new research indicatea significant threat to the marine ecology from heavy metal, and there is evidence of implications to public health.contamination.

Biography

1. Terry I. Mohammed – Dr. Terry I. Mohammed completed his PhD from the University of the West Indies at St. Augustine Trinidad in May of 2000. He briefly worked at the Institute of Marine Affairs in Trinidad and moved to the Petroleum Company of Trinidad and Tobago where remained for 16 years, attaining the position of Head Chemist. He obtained his MBA in 2009 from the Herriot-Watt Business School, University of Edinburgh. Dr. Terry I. Mohammed joined the University of the West Indies in 2014 as Lecturer and Researcher in Analytical and Industrial Chemistry.

Speaker
Terry I. Mohammed / University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago

Abstract

In the last years, the consumption of pharmaceutical and their proved occurrence in the environment has become an important issue. The amount of human pharmaceuticals reaching in the environment depends on the consumption amount, and excretion rate via faces and urine. A smaller contribution to the presence of the pharmaceuticals in the environment is due to the disposal of outdated medicines down household drains and to the pharmaceutical industry waste. In this context, the complexity of biological and environmental samples requires analytical protocols that provide high selectivity, sensitivity, selectivity, clean-up, small volume samples, ability to parallelization and a decrease of the time analysis against the most commonly used drugs. Such requirements are closely linked to the miniaturization of analytical procedures which has been a tendency in recent years. Important incentives for this concept are reducing sample volumes, reducing solvents and chemicals, and portability of analytical instrumentation. The miniaturization and automatization of sample treatment procedures (on-chip) offer multiple advantages compared with existing traditional techniques. It also, offer excellent clean-up either with biological or environmental samples and significantly reduce the time of analysis from the sample collection till data obtaining. In this work, a study of acid drugs analysis is carried out into a microfluidic chip device for its application in environmental samples.

Biography

Dr. Maria Ramos Payan has completed her PhD from University of Seville, Spainand postdoctoral studies from University of Copenhagen (Denmark), University of North Carolina (USA) and Microelectronic National Center of Barcelona (Spain). She is leader of the microfluidic research line. She has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Speaker
Maria Ramos Payan / University of Sevilla, Spain

Abstract

Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are a class of antibiotics which are now widely used in agriculture and veterinary medicine for the therapy of infections and the prevention of animal diseases. Due to different adverse effects, they are considered as priority contaminants posing serious risks to human health. Therefore, a control of residual quantities of FQs in foodstuffs is an important task in food production. To solve this problem, the development of fast, simple, high-performance, and accurate methods for antibiotics’ detection are needed. The immunochromatographic analysis (ICA) that satisfies these requirenents and characterized by high specificity and sensitivity can serve for a rapid non-laboratory screening of a large number of food samples. In this study, for the detection of fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, and clinofloxacin ICA formats based on various approaches of a marker (colloidal gold nanoparticles) introducing are suggested. Direct and indirect labeling were carried out by conjugation of colloidal gold nanoparticles with specific anti-FQs antibodies and anti-species immunoglobulins, respectivily. The developed ICA formats allowed for determination of FQs with detection limits of down to 5 pg/mL within 15 min. The developed ICA systems were tested for antibiotic detection in foodstuffs (milk and meat samples). Procedures of preliminary sample preparation allowed for preservation of high analytical characteristics were proposed. Due to availability and universality, the devepoled methods are promising for the control of antibiotics of another classes as well as a wide range of other low molecular weight contaminants. This study was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project 17-58-4518-Ind_а).

Biography

Olga D. Hendrickson has completed his PhD in A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. Now she is a Senior Researcher in the Immunobiochemistry Laboratory of Federal Research Center "Fundamentals of Biotechnology" of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Her scientific interests include quantitative studies of immune complexes’ formation, interaction of nanoparticles with biomolecules, structural bases of interactions with bioreceptors, biosensor systems, development of new immunochemical methods for the detection of biologically active compounds, nanobiosafety issues, methods for quality control and safety of food and feed, etc. She has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Olga Hendrickson / A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry, Russia

Abstract

Photoluminescent methodologies are a group of powerful analytical tools used for trace analytes determination due to their inherent sensitivity. However, when real samples are analyzed, many times troubles arise due to the matrix complexity. In order to overcome these difficulties, different strategies must be applied. The need for more selective systems of separation analytes has produced important developments of chemical separation techniques. Cloud Point Extraction (CPE) processes have been reported for extraction of metal ions, biological and clinical species and environmental clean-up methods. Any species associated to micellar aggregates can be extracted from the initial solution and preconcentrated in a small volume of the surfactant-rich phase prior to instrumental determination, improving selectivity and sensitivity. Likewise, Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) has come to the forefront compared to other preconcentration and/or separation techniques. Both of these strategies offer several advantages such as operational flexibility, high enrichment factors, low cost and simplicity, reducing consumption and exposure to toxic solvents, representing environmentally friendly alternatives. In this speech, results obtained of developed photolumininescent methodologies will be presented; CPE and/or SPE steps were used for analytes isolation. (Up to 250 words)

Biography

Dr. Fernandez has completed his PhD and postdoctoral from Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis, ARGENTINA. She is Associate Professor of Instrumental Analysis for Pharmacy and Biochemistry in the same University, Director of Research Projects with Grants from Universidad Nacional de San Luis and CONICET, and Director of Extension Project named “Tabaquismo: S.O.S. Jóvenes”, to carry out awareness activities in the anti tobacco fight. Actually, she is Head of Secretaría de Posgrado de la Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia de la Universidad Nacional de San Luis. She has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Liliana Fernandez / National University of San Luis, Argentina

Abstract

The growing and intensive needs of researchers and laboratories lead to the development of new measurement methods which are faster, less expensive or more accurate than current methods. Indeed, Design of Experiments (DoE) was used in order to develop a new fast and accurate UPLC method to combat counterfeit drugs; it was conducted in two main steps: screening designs and response-surface designs. In parallel, Design Space (DS) approach was applied to this method in order to identify most influent variables and their ranges within which consistent quality can be achieved. This approach also served as a basis for providing relevant interpretation of the observed effects and chromatographic behaviours. In addition, to define correctly the DS (Fig.1) desirability function was used. High resolution for peaks pair of at least 3 and maximum run time of 1.6 min was provided by the method. The proposed method was applied to investigate 26 illicit medicines.

Biography

Speaker
Yassine Hameda Benchekroun / Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah University ,Morocco

Abstract

CO2 reforming of methane, also named dry reforming of methane, is a method of producing hydrogen from the reaction of carbon dioxide with methane (DRM)(〖CH〗_4+〖CO〗_2↔2H_2+2CO).The major problem associated with this reaction is the sintering of the active phase and carbon formation [1]. The carbon generated during this reaction can be the result of direct decomposition of methane 〖(CH〗_4↔C+2H_(2 )) or the Boudouard reaction (2CO ↔ 〖CO〗_2+C)[1, 2]. Many ideas were put forward by scientists to develop catalysts bearing both high activity and high resistance to coke. The activity of a catalyst is related to the metal surface area [2, 3]. This implies that the catalytic activity is proportional with the high dispersion of metal particles. The aim of the present work is to investigate the use of NiAl-HDL and NiFe-HDL, previously prepared by co-precipitation method with Ni2+/Al3+=2 and pH=12.The products obtained after heat treatment at 800 C were characterized by XRD, ICP, TPR, BET, SEM-EDX and TEM. After reduction, the catalysts were evaluated in the reforming of methane reaction under continuous flow with CH4/CO2 ratio equal to 1, at atmospheric pressure and a temperature range [400-700C]. At 700 °C, the catalysts showed significant CH4 conversions, i.e, 87 % and 79 % respectively for both NiAl-HDL and NiFe-HDL respectively; this was compared to 91 %, and 84 % for CO2 conversions. Despite NiAl-HDL catalyst exhibiting rather high catalytic activity compared to NiFe-HDL, this latter showed a good resistance to metal sintering and carbon deposition.

Biography

Djamila Halliche has completed his PhD from University of Sciences and Technology HOUARI BOUMEDIENE institute of chemistry algeria. She is the director of National Agency for Valorization of the Results of Research and Technological Development (ANVREDET). She has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
HALLICHE Djamila / National Agency for the Valorisation of Research Results, Algeria

Abstract

Esters of phthalic acid are very dangerous for human health. Their occurrence in wines is connected with the inflow from the plasticized polymer seals, plastic piping, tanks and stoppers. In this study the high sensitive gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric determination of phthalates in low alcoholic beverages (champagne, red and white wine) coupled ultrasound-assisted emulsification-microextraction was developed. As extractants environmentally friendly hydrocarbons - n-heptane and hexane are proposed. The sources of possible systematic errors were investigated: leaking of o-phthalates from chromatographic septum; contamination of phthalate in solvents; influence of macro components of wines(sugar, alcohol, anthocyanins); the hydrolysis of o-phthalates and others. For the first time it is shown that the impact of these factors can lead to an overestimation or underestimation of the actual concentration of impurities by 1-2 orders of magnitude. The methods of accounting or elimination of systematic errors are proposed. Purification of solvents by Rayleigh distillation method allows to obtain samples with impurity content lower than (1-4)∙10-3 mgL-1. Containers for sampling and storage of samples to be analyzed should be made of borosilicate glass or quartz. The content of phthalates in wines was 0.03 - 1 mgL-1. The largest concentrations are characteristic for diethyl-, di-n-butyl- and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalates. The limits of detection of esters of о-phthalic acid in low alcohol beverages achieved are at the level of 10-6–10-5 mgL-1 and are highly competitive with the best world results. The relative expanded uncertainty of the determination of toxicants is at the level of 13- 30%.

Biography

V. A. Krylov, Doctor of Chemistry, Professor, Head of the Division of Analytical Chemistry of the Nizhny Novgorod State University. The main direction of scientific research of V. A. Krylov is the development of the theory and applications of chromatography for the analysis of high purity substances, environmental objects and development of methods of the microextraction. The attained detection limits for molecular impurities constitute 10–6 to 10–11 wt % and hit a record low. He is the author of more than 200 scientific papers, including reviews on the analytical chemistry of high purity volatile substances, air and liquid-liquid microextraction preconcentration.

Speaker
V.A. Krylov / Nizhny Novgorod State University, Russia

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