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Plenary Talks

Abstract

Building a collaborative cGMP facility as part of the Australian rapid vaccine production pipeline against emerging epidemic diseases George Lovrecz 1 , Jo Carina 1 , Keith Cappell 2 , Tram Phan 1 , Louis Lu 1 , Mylinh La 1 , Tam Pham 1 and Tim Adams 1 1 Biomedical Manufacturing, CSIRO, Australia 2 School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Australia A range of emerging epidemic infectious diseases (such as Lassa Fever, Filovirus pathogens, Zika) were identified by the World Health Organization. These diseases all could pose a significant threat to society and individuals. Management at an early stage of the potential outbreaks of these diseases is crucial to minimize their development into humanitarian crises. Unfortunately, there are many cases where market incentives alone do not foster vaccine development against these diseases. The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) aims to facilitate and finance the creation of new vaccines including their clinical testing and stockpiling. This seminar summarizes the Australian effort to create a collaborative vaccine development network to establish platform technologies and manufacturing capabilities that can be deployed rapidly against outbreaks of various pathogens. We will also discuss our current experience with recombinant glycoprotein-based vaccine candidates (Hendra and Ebola viruses) and suggest novel vaccine development ideas such as subunit vaccines and the ‘molecular clamp’ technology to build a successful vaccine development pipeline.

Biography

Professor George Lovrecz is a Senior Principal Research Scientist at CSIRO Manufacturing with over 30 year experience in fermentation, specialising in the scale-up of mammalian cell cultures. George provides expertise in the area of large-scale production, optimisation, development and characterisation of recombinant proteins for internal and external research collaborators both for academic and industrial projects. His laboratory has ISO9001 and veterinary cGMP accreditations to provide quality material for pre-clinical, toxicology and up to Phase- I clinical trials. George also has been involved in teaching and training at various organisations: UNSW, Victoria University (VU), University of Melbourne and he is an adjunct professor at RMIT and Monash Universities. George established the Annual Protein Expression Workshop (PEWS) at CSIRO Parkville, 19 years ago, which has grown to be one of the biggest science forum in this field in Australia.

Speaker
George Lovrecz / Monash University
Australia

Abstract

Effect of litter moisture on foot pad dermatitis in broiler chickens raised on reused bedding. In the United States, broilers are often raised on reused bedding if disease conditions are not a problem. This requires enhanced bedding management to maintain dry bedding, reduce disease incidence and minimize foot pad dermatitis. Foot pad dermatitis (FPD) incidence and severity was assessed in broiler chickens following exposure to high moisture bedding. Two hundred 46 day-old broilers with and without existing FPD were placed in 20 pens (0.9 meters x 1.2 meters) with used bedding (5-7.5 cm deep). One-half of the pens were wetted with 3.8 liters of water on Days 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, and 52. FPD incidence and severity were assessed on 62 days of age. Common starter, grower and finisher feeds were used. Water was available and lighting was continuous throughout the study. FPD incidence was 8% on dry bedding and 28% on wetted bedding in birds prior to this experiment with older birds. On Day 62, the severity of FPD increased in birds with FPD at Day 46 when kept on wetted (63%) as compared un-wetted bedding (11%). FPD incidence remained high (94%) when birds were kept on wetted bedding, whereas there was a reduction (56%) on un-wetted bedding. Although many feel that early exposure to wet bedding is a main cause of FPD, late exposure to can also increase FPD incidence. Concurrently, FPD lesions can be reversed if the litter conditions improve late in the growth cycle. Joseph Hess completed a B.S. in Poultry Science from The Pennsylvania State University and completed M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Georgia in Poultry Science with a specialization in nutrition. Dr. Hess is currently a Professor and Extension Specialist with Auburn University in Auburn, AL, USA.

Biography

Joseph Hess completed a B.S. in Poultry Science from The Pennsylvania State University and completed M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Georgia in Poultry Science with a specialization in nutrition. Dr. Hess is currently a Professor and Extension Specialist with Auburn University in Auburn, AL, USA.

Speaker
Joseph B. Hess / Auburn University
USA

Abstract

Skeletal human muscle stem/progenitor cells modified with connexn-43 prevented arrhythmia in rat post-infarction heart - example for human model of ischaemic cardiomyopathy Anna Rugowska, Agnieszka Malcher and Maciej Kurpisz Institute of Human Genetics, Pol. Acad Sci., Poznan, Poland Different animal models may serve for modelling of civilization diseases in order to check their possible molecular background and new therapeutic approaches to correct them. In this study we have applied stem cell therapy (human primary myoblast suspension) in combination with genetic modification by using transient transfection with GJA1 coding sequence (responsible for gap junction formation) with subsequent observations in post infarction mice cardiomyopathy associated arrhythmia after stem cell intervention. Human stem cells of myogenic origin were obtained from residual tissues of skeletal muscles remained after orthopaedic surgery. Isolated myoblasts were transfected with pCiNeo-GJA1 plasmid with an efficacy of approximately 87%, Gene overexpression was assessed using qPCR and subsequent analysis revealed over a 40-fold increase expression of GJA1 in myoblasts transfected with the appropriate coding sequence carried out on the plasmid vector (MbCx43) compared to MbWT (‘native’ myoblast control) which was also confirmed at the protein level (connexin-43) by Western immunoblotting. Furthermore, using arrhythmic score, it was demonstrated the positive effect of the MbCx43 cell intervention in reducing additional secondary stimulations in rat post-infarcted heart compared with wild type cells or ‘sham’ operations. Selected gene responses (responsible for heart remodeling and ion channels) showed significantly affected expression profile in the rat myocardium which were changed upon connexin-43 modified human myoblasts. We have demonstrated that genetic modification of human myoblasts with connexin-43 prevented pro-arrhythmic effects of myogenic implanted cells and influenced myocardial gene expression profile while serving for the model of experimental treatment that could be extrapolated to human ischaemic cardiomyopathy.

Biography

Prof. Kurpisz, Head of Department of Reproductive Biology and Stem Cells, Institute of Human Genetics, Poznan, Poland. He graduated Poznan Medical University in 1980 and was promoted to MD in Immunology, and then in PhD in Genetics, since 1996 - a full professor. His professional training includes UK, USA, Japan and Germany. His interests: immunology, infertility, andrology and anti-aging. His experimental therapy is dedicated to stem cells. Published over 400 papers, sought 70 grants, supervised 13 doctorates and over 29 masters. Citations in Web of Science: over 2 500 (no self citations), H- index around 30, total IF – over 400.

Speaker
Maciej Kurpisz / Polish Academy of Sciences Session
Poland

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Lead, Cadmium, Arsenic and Mercury are toxic heavy metals (HM) when ingested by animals. They form residue in meat and constitute health hazard in humans when consumed. However, there has been scanty information on HM detoxification in goats sold in open markets. Therefore, the possibility of chelating the residue of heavy metals from goat tissue, using salts of conventional chelator was evaluated. Goats (n=48) aged 12-18 months weighing 12.72±0.9 kg were randomly drenched assigned to four treatments (0.5mg/kgBW) with four HM: lead (T1), cadmium (T2), arsenic (T3) and mercury(T4) for five days. Each treatment was further assigned to four groups of three goats each in a one way completely randomized design. Each group was remedied with chelator: Ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic (EDTA), Thiamine and Cysteine at 50mg/kgBW for seven days while the last respective group served as control (no chelator). Blood (5 mL) was sampled before and after chelation and assayed for HM using standard procedures. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and ANOVA at α0.05. The residue levels of cadmium, arsenic, mercury and lead in goat blood increased by 211%, 44%, 37% and 29% respectively after exposure. The EDTA chelated arsenic (274.1±82.3) than lead (57.0±3.6) and cadmium (81.1±21.3), thiamine chelated arsenic (273.9±32.4) than lead (116.3±21.2), cadmium (89.1±41.6) and mercury (8.7±7.4). Cysteine chelated similar concentration of lead and arsenic but was not significant across HM. Lead, cadmium and mercury residues were detected in raw chevon sold in open market. Ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid and thiamine were more effective chelators of heavy metal residues in goats. Keywords: Heavy metals, chelator, detoxification, salt, goats

Biography

Professor Andrew Omojola completed his PhD from University of Ibadan, Nigeria. He is the director of Teaching and Research Farm, University of Ibadan and the Chief Executive Officer, Tunik Foods Nigeria Limited. He is a professor of Meat Science/Food Safety and a visiting Professor at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana. He has published more than 135 papers in reputed journals and has supervised more than 12 doctoral students within and outside Nigeria. He has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Speaker
OMOJOLA ANDREW / University of Ibadan Nigeria

Abstract

The present study was conducted in Tunisia. The environmental impact of poultry production were evaluated using life-cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. The global warming potential, acidification and eutrophication for production of 1 ton meat were estimated to be 2531.72 kg CO2-eq, 37.35 kg SO2-eq and 14.69 kg PO4-eq, in summer and 4943.73 kg CO2-eq, 53.2 kg SO2-eq and 16.78 kg PO4-eq in winter, respectively. The evaluations revealed that the broiler production stage was the main source of environmental impacts principally due to production and transportation of feed and on-farm emissions in the life cycle of chicken meat production. Broiler production farms, account for 63% of total energy consumption. The goal of this study was to estimate the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG): methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and carbon dioxide (CO2) from poultry production in Sfax province of Tunisia. The calculations of GHG emissions were based on Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines. Over the study period (2015-2017), the CH4 emission from manure management decreased in layer chickens but there was a gradual increase in CH4emission from broiler chickens. Layer chickens produced lower direct and indirect N2O emissions from 2015 to 2017, whereas the average direct and indirect N2O emissions from manure management for broiler chickens were 13.71 and 5.23 Gg CO2-eq/yr, respectively. Annual direct and indirect N2O emissions for broiler chickens tended to decrease in 2017. Average CO2 emission from direct on-farm energy uses for broiler and layer chickens were 47.32 and 151.31 Gg CO2-eq/yr, respectively. Indirect N2O emission was the largest component of GHG emissions in broilers. In layer chickens, the largest contributing factor to GHG emissions was CO2 from direct on-farm energy uses. Overall, it is an important issue for the poultry industry to reduce GHG emissions with the effective approaches for the sustainability of agricultural practices.

Biography

Dr. Naceur Mhamdi has completed his PhD from Higher Institute of Agronomy of Chott-Meriem, Sousse University, Tunisia. He is a member editor of more than 15 internationl journals. He has published more than 80 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Speaker
Naceur M'HAMDI / National Institue of Agronomy of Tunis - Tunisia

Abstract

A 2 × 2 factorial arrangement was designed to test effects of supplementation of a low (L, 75 mg/kg BW) vs. high (H, 150 mg/kg BW) L-arginine given at early (first 56 days) vs. late (last 56 days) pregnancy on maternal hormones and neonatal traits. Thirty Najdi pregnant ewes were randomly allocated into 6 groups. Ewes in G1 and G2 served as controls (C), given 50 ml saline at either early (CE) or late (CL) pregnancy, respectively. G3 and G4 ewes in early pregnancy received low (LE) and high L-arginine (HE), respectively. G5 and G6 ewes in late pregnancy received low (LL) and high (HL) L-arginine, respectively. A weekly blood sample was collected from initiation of the treatment till parturition. Serum growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), insulin, progesterone (P4) and estradiol 17 β (E2) profiles were determined. Neonatal traits were also determined. Insulin was higher (P < 0.05) in low arginine compared with control and high dosage. HL ewes (G6) exhibited increased (P < 0.05) IGF-I and decreased plasma E2. IGF-I increased and GH decreased at late pregnancy. The increase (P < 0.05) in plasma P4 between early and late pregnancy was slightly (P < 0.10) affected by L-arginine dosage. Low arginine increased (P < 0.05) birth weight by about 35% (4.86 kg) over the control (3.58 kg); whereas high arginine tended to increase birth weight (4.31 kg, P > 0.05). Lamb survival rates at birth in LE ewes were highest (100%) compared to other treatments. In conclusion, supplementing pregnant ewes with low dosage of L-arginine at early stage of gestation increased lamb birth weight and survival, and improved maternal health.

Biography

Speaker
Ahmad Abdulaziz AlAl-Ghaneim / Qassim University
pakistan

Abstract

Conventional Electron Microscopy (EM) both Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopy is one of the gold standard techniques to study the patho-morphological changes of different diseases at sub cellular level in the field of veterinary medicine infact in life sciences. EM study is otherwise called as "cell pathology" which deals with all membranous structural deviations, localization of disease causing agents, attachment of virions or viruses to the cilia, villi, alocalisation of environmental pollutants and nanoparticles in different parts of cell world. There are a variety of techniques avialable starting from Light Microscopy (LM) to molecular techniques like QRT-PCR, genomics and proteomics, which may involve accurate diagnosis and specific pathogen identification but, EM technique is having its significance to support all molecular techniques due to conscientious scrutiny of all sub-celluar structural changes in response to the process of disease development in relation with etiological agents which target different structures in a cell or group of cells. Conventional EM is a multistepped, time consuming and expertise technique which needs to have continuous practice and update to meet the scientific community demand. There are several advances which have come in the EM field but, conventional EM technique holds its impartance in the filed of life scinece. Great advantage with conventional EM is that a beginner is throughly tarined with cell world who can easily makeup with advanced EM's by using cryo-tomography and its interpretaion. As we all aware that "seeing is beliving", it is possible with conventioanl EM to peep into cell world and to catch the culprit.Therefore EM has become more widely known specific field of science in recent years.

Biography

Professor Mekala Lakshman has completed his PhD from Sri Venkateswara Veterianry University (SVVU), TIRUPATI, Andhra Pradesh, India, and learned conventional Electron Microscopy techniques on own at RUSKA LABS, Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Scienece, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad, India. Presently working as Professor and Head, Deaprtment of Veterinary Pathology and Officer-In-Charge of Ruska Labs, in PV Narsimharao Telanagana Veterinary University (PVNRTVU), Hyderabad, India. Published 58 research articles in various reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member and reviwer of repute. Guided more than 33 PG and PhD shcolars (11 PG and PhD scholars as a major guide and 22 as a minor guide including two (2) foreign students).

Speaker
Mekala. Lakshman / Sri Venkateswara Veterinary University India

Abstract

The global production of poultry meat since the 1940s has been growing faster than any other sector in both developed and developing countries. This growth pattern can be expected to continue because of the inherent improvement in feed conversion ratio (FCR), and the lower production costs associated with intensive poultry production. A FCR of 1.80−1.90 is possible for modern broilers. In comparison, the FCRs for pork and beef are around 3−4 and 7−10 range, respectively. Currently, the goal of an average broiler complex is 2:2:42, which means growing a two kilogram bird, with a feed conversion of 2:1, in 42 days. With continued genetic advances, broiler producers will be able to reach that same weight with just one kilogram of feed, probably by 2025. It is generally accepted that feed costs represent about 70% of the total cost of poultry production and this makes the bird's ability to use feed efficiently very important. Birds considered to have better FCR typically have a lower proportion of feed intake to body weight gain. In conclusion, FCR has been improved through changes in three main aspects of modern broiler production. These are: (1) changes in flock management that have contributed to gains in feed efficiency by improving temperature controls, lighting system and bird densities; (2) research in poultry nutrition has played a key role in uderstanding the nutritional requirements of modern broilers that allow precise formulation of diets for specific grow out periods; and (3) significant advances in genetic selection towards improved FCR.

Biography

Yusuf Leonard Henuk is a Professor in the Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture at University of Sumatera Utara (USU), Medan, North Sumatera, Indonesia. He received a Bachelor’s degree (S1: ‘Sarjana’) from the Faculty of Animal Science, the University of Nusa Cendana in Indonesia from 1980-1984. He obtained Master in Rural Science (M.Rur.Sc.) from the University of New England from 1991 – 1995 and continued Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) from the University of Queensland from 1998 – 2001. Both in Australia. He participated in the courses of “Arabic Language” and mainly “Poultry Production and Health” from 15 January – 31 March 2008 organized by the Egyptian International Centre for Agriculture (EICA), Cairo, Egypt. He was a twice Visiting Professor to the Department of Poultry Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, USA (September – December 2010 & 2017). Prof. Henuk was a prolific writer and has published many articles in international journal and mainly poultry science, e.g. World’s Poultry Science Journal as well as international scientific meetings as such as 1st International Conference on Native Chicken (“Invited Speaker”: Centara Hotel, 23-25 February 2015, Khon Kaen-Thailand); 5th International Conference on Sustainable Animal Agriculture for Developing Countries (“Invited Speaker”: 27-30 October 2015, Pattaya,Thailand); The 37th Malaysian Society of Animal Production (MSAP) Annual Conference (“Plenary Speaker”: Hatten Hotel, ,1-3 June 2016, Mallaca, Malaysia); The 1st International Conference on Tropical Animal Science and Production (“Invited Speaker”: Ambassador Hotel, July 26-29, 2016, Bangkok, Thailand); 25th World Poultry Congress (“Invited Speaker”: China National Convention Center, 05 – 09 September, 2016, Beijing, China); The 3rd Animal Production International Seminar & The 3rd ASEAN Regional Conference on Animal Production 3rd APIS & 3rd ARCAP (“Keynote Speaker”: Royal Orchids Garden Hotel, 19-21 October 2016, Batu Malang, Indonesia); 2nd International Conference on Plant Science & Physiology (“Keynote Speaker”: Avani Atrium Hotel Bangkok, 26-27 June 2017, Bangkok, Thailand); 8th International Conference on Animal Health and Veterinary Medicine (“Keynote Speaker”: Park Inn by Radisson, October 20-21, 2017, Toronto, Canada); 6th World Waterfowl Conference (“Oral Presenter”: October 22 – 25, 2017, Howard Civil Service International House, Taipei, Taiwan); 3rd International Conference on Veterinary & Livestock (“Keynote Speaker”: Avani Atrium Hotel, November 02-03, 2017, Bangkok, Thailand); 9th Global Veterinary Summit (“Keynote Speaker”: Hampton Inn Tropicana, November 16-17, 2017, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA); International Meeting on Veterinary and Animal Science (“Keynote Speaker”: Dubai, UAE, August 6 – 7 2018); 16th World Congress on Advances in Nutrition, Food Science & Technology (“Speaker Faculty”: September 10-11, 2018, Zurich, Switzerland); and Euro-Global Conference on Food Chemistry, Agronomy and Technology (FAT) (“Keynote Speaker”: September 20-22 2018, Rome, Italy).

Speaker
Yusuf L Henuk / University of Sumatera Utara Indonesia
Sessions:

Abstract

Zoopharmacognosy is the practice in which wild animals self-medicate using an evolutionary adaptation in which their innate instinct enables them to communicate and relate with medicinal plants within their environment, to bring about health and wellbeing. Unfortunately, domestication has restricted the opportunity for animals to use their instinctive knowledge to select nature's medicines. Through evolution and natural selection, the relationship between animals and plants has resulted in animals developing a number of strategies to utilize the medicinal properties of plants. Wild animals are able to seek out medicinal plants at the first signs of poor health, but because our domesticated and captive animals rarely have the opportunity to forage on a wide variety of medicinal plants, more challenging health problems often occur. Applied Zoopharmacognosy takes nature’s medicine kit to animals in captive and domestic environments, allowing the animal to express its innate ability to self-medicate by offering a wide range of plant compounds. Depending on where and what the problem is, will determine how an animal will choose to self-medicate. The state of an animal’s health can alter the taste and smell preferences of a plant, for a healthy animal it would be deterred by the plants bitter taste and perhaps putrid smell. Once the selected plants have dealt with the problem the animal should then proceed to reject the extracts that have been selected, demonstrating the animals very own dosing mechanism. Animals with the same symptoms may choose to select a different remedy which is why this approach highlights the fact that this is individualized medicine.

Biography

Bethany Chamberlin has completed her Bachelor of Science from Writtle University College and has furthered her studies at the Academy Of Applied Zoopharmacognosy. Today, Bethany continues to help animals by providing them with the opportunity to use their innate abilitly to self medicate and enrich the enivornments in which animals live. She gives lectures to college and university students and has written many articles.

Speaker
BETH CHAMBERLIN / Equine Pharmacognosy UK

Abstract

This abstract represents a review of original data concerning character and mechanisms of action of thermal stress-high temperatures on viability, reproductive functions and performance in farm animals (rabbits and pigs). It is demonstrated, that thermal stress can negatively affect consumption of nutrients, mortality, gravidity and daily gain. High temperature does not affect release of corticosterone and ultrastructure of ovarian cells, but alters ovarian cell proliferation, apoptosis, synthesis and accumulation of heat shock proteins, release of reproductive steroid hormones and IGF-I, and the response of ovarian cells to physiological stimulators (IGF-I, leptin, FSH). Additions of hormones IGF-I, leptin and FSH can affects these parameters and to prevent the effects of hyperthermia on porcine ovarian cells. It is not to be excluded, that IGF-I, leptin, FSH and progesterone can be used for neutralization of heat stress on farm animal reproduction.

Biography

Prof. A.V. Sirotkin, PhD, DrSc is working as Professor at the Constantine the Philosopher University. His area of interests are the effect of environmental factors on reproduction and its endocrine and intracellular mechanisms of action. He has about 630 publications including 130 full papers in the international journals. He is a member of editorial boards of 4 international journals and a recipient of more than 10 national and international awards.

Speaker
Alexander V. Sirotkin / Constantine the Philosopher University Slovak Republic

Abstract

The survey was conducted to assess cattle breeders’ awareness, perceptions and antibiotics usage with regard to bovine dermatophilosis in Oyo State. Dermatophilosis is highly economically important contagious zoonotic skin disease caused by gram positive bacterium (Dermatophilus congolensis); it invades the skin and causes skin disease. A total of 400 cattle breeders were interviewed with the help of an interpreter (Haausa-fulani) and well-structured questionnaires administered to the respondents on bovine dermatophilosis in their kraal and cattle markets from June to December 2017 across the four geopolitical zones; Ibarapa, Oyo/Ogbomosho, Oke ogun and Ibadan. The results showed that all the breeders were aware of dermatophilosis as an important cattle disease as they had it in their herd at one time or the other. 3% considered bovine dermatophilosis as dangerous to human (zoonotic) while majority of the respondents (97%) do not considered it so. 1% considered skin contact with the lesion as the mode of transmission while 99% were unaware of its mode of transmission. 11% of the respondents sought veterinary intervention, 49% engaged in self-treatment while 40% sought both Veterinary and self-treatment to manage the disease. 97% of the breeders agreed to have used antibiotics for the treatment, the most commonly used drugs were ivermectin, penicillin, and tetracycline. 4% adhered to manufacturer instructions, 94% did not while 2% were unaware. 4% considered withdrawal period, 4% did not and 92% were unaware. 96% considered the drugs as effective for treatment, 2% considered the drugs ineffective while 2% were unaware of the effectiveness. The practices, attitudes and perceptions of farmers about dermatophilosis were very poor or with very low knowledge. There are greater needs to increase awareness and public enlightenment about bovine dermatophilosis among cattle breeders in Oyo state, Nigeria

Biography

Olaogun, Sunday Charles (DVM, MVSc, FVCN). a Lecturer in the Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. He teaches Animal Management and Husbandry courses, Food Animal Medicine, Ruminant Diseases, and Ruminant clinics. He is also a Veterinary Registrar to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. His areas of research are on ruminant skin diseases, gastroenterology, ruminant neonatal health, veterinary epidemiology and prevention

Speaker
Sunday Charles Olaogun / Sunday Charles Olaogun Nigeria

Abstract

Nanotechnology is the manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology. A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology Initiative, which defines nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometers. This definition reflects the fact that quantum mechanical effects are important at this quantum-realm scale, and so the definition shifted from a particular technological goal to a research category inclusive of all types of research and technologies that deal with the special properties of matter that occur below the given size threshold. It is therefore common to see the plural form "nanotechnologies" as well as "nanoscale technologies" to refer to the broad range of research and applications whose common trait is size. Materials science, also commonly known as materials science and engineering, is an interdisciplinary field which deals with the discovery and design of new materials. This relatively new scientific field involves studying materials through the materials paradigm (synthesis, structure, properties and performance). It incorporates elements of physics and chemistry, and is at the forefront of nanoscience and nanotechnology research. In recent years, materials science has become more widely known as a specific field of science and engineering.

Biography

Joseph Hess completed a B.S. in Poultry Science from The Pennsylvania State University and completed M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Georgia in Poultry Science with a specialization in nutrition. Dr. Hess is currently a Professor and Extension Specialist with Auburn University in Auburn, AL, USA.

Speaker
Joseph B. Hess / Auburn University USA

Abstract

The high cost of poultry feed ingredients resulting from diverse usage in human diets as well as industrial applications have necessitated the search for alternative replacements that are cost effective. It is this line of thought that has generated this research interest in Doum palm (Hyphaene thebaica) seed meal, which was reported to contain high amount of energy. An 8week study was conducted to evaluate the effects of hyphaene thebaica seed meal (HTSM) as substitute for maize on the growth response and blood parameters of broiler chickens. Five experimental diets were formulated to meet nutrient requirement standards of broilers. Diet 1 (0 % HTSM) served as the control while diets 2, 3, 4 and 5 contained 5, 10, 15 and 20 %HTSM respectively replacing maize in the diets of birds. A total of two hundred and twenty five (225) day-old broiler chicks were randomly allotted into five treatment groups with three replicates of fifteen birds each. Each group was assigned to the five experimental diets in completely randomized design (CRD). Throughout the experimental period, feed and water were provided ad libitum for all treatment groups. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the parameters measured except average daily feed intake (P>0.05). The average daily weight gain and feed conversion ratio of birds fed 0, 5 and 10 % HTSM diets were significantly better (P<0.05) compared to those fed 15 and 20 % HTSM diets. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the blood parameters measured except the packed cell volume (29.08- 31.89 %) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin (14.69-15.67 pg). The white blood cell (11.45-18.14 x 109/l), red blood cell (4.71-6.99 x 1012/l), haemoglobin (6.92-10.05 g/dl) and aspartate transaminase (72.95-90.16 iu/l), alanine aminotransaminase (62.84-79.50 iu/l) and alkaline phosphatase (100.26-108.77 iu/l) increased (p<0.05) as the dietary levels of HTSM increased across the treatments. It was concluded that broiler chickens can tolerate up to 10 % raw HTSM in their diets without adverse effect on growth performance. Also, adequate processing of the seed should be carried out to reduce the anti-nutritional factors to a tolerable level before being used in broiler diet.

Biography

Speaker
Makinde, O. John / Federal University Nigeria

Abstract

Cholesterol profile and gut microbial population of laying birds fed L-Dopa supplemented diets Babatunde R. O. Omidiwura, Adebisi F. Agboola and Adeola R, Adelu Department of Animal Science, University of Ibadan, Nigeria In a 42-day feeding trial, effect of L-Dopa on performance, serum cholesterol and intestinal microbial load in laying birds was investigated. One hundred and twenty 34-weeks-old layers were allotted to 5 dietary treatments of 8 replicates and three birds per replicate. The birds were fed diets supplemented with L-Dopa at graded inclusion levels of (0.0 ,0.1 ,0.2, 0.3 and 0.4%) in a completely randomized design. Performance parameters were monitored. At day 42, egg, meat and blood (2.5 mL) were sampled to determine total cholesterol and lipoproteins using standard procedures. The ilea digesta was collected for microbial load analysis. Data were analysed at α0.05. The L-Dopa inclusion had no effect on the performance parameters and egg cholesterol profile. Serum cholesterol levels of birds fed the control diet and those on 0.1% and 0.2% L-Dopa supplemented diets were similar but significantly higher than those fed 0.3% and 0.4% L-Dopa. In meat, the Cholesterol and Low Density Lipoprotein of birds fed control diet were significantly higher than 0.1% L-Dopa and 0.3% L-Dopa but similar to other diets. Also, Escherichia coli population was highest (7.25 x104cfu/mL) in birds on control diet and least (1.35 x104cfu/mL) in birds fed 0.3% L-Dopa. Lactobacillus counts of birds on L-Dopa supplemented diets were significantly higher than those on the control diet. It could, therefore, be concluded that 0.3% L-Dopa inclusion significantly improved the cholesterol profile in the blood and meat, reduced the population of Escherichia coli and effectively increased the population of Lactobacillus in laying birds.

Biography

Dr B. R. O. Omidiwura, a nutritional Biochemist and Phytochemist, has completed his PhD at the age of 35 years from University of Ibadan, Nigeria. He holds administrative positions in the University. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as Deputy editor in chief of Tropical Animal Production Investigations. He works with seasoned scientists; Dr Adebisi F. Agboola, an Animal Nutritionist and Feed Biotechnologist, Dr A. O. Adekambi, an Environmental Microbiologist and many others

Speaker
B. R. O. Omidiwura / University of Ibadan, Nigeria

Abstract

Several environmental challenges have been implicated in poultry performance which limits successful poultry production. Continuous use of synthetic antioxidant could have adverse effect on animal products. Antioxidants of plant origin have been known for their ready availability and affordability. This research is designed to determine the effects of Vernonia amygdalina leaf flavonoid (VALF) on haematology, serum biochemistry and oxidative status of cockerels under elevated environmental temperature. A total of 140 Rhode Island white cockerel (3 weeks old) were randomly distributed into 5 treatment groups, replicated 4 times with 7 birds per replicate and given 0mls, 0.4g of Vitamin C, 30mls, 60mls and 90mls of VALF/ litre water, designated as T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5 respectively in a completely randomized design (CRD). Birds were reared with an additional external heat source (400C). Results revealed that birds under 90ml/litre of VALF (T5) had the highest values of PCV, Hb, RBC, TP and albumin. The highest catalase value was recorded in T4, while the highest values of SOD and GPx were observed in T2. T3 recorded the lowest MDA value. T5 had the highest ALT and least AST values. VALF had a positive response on cockerels reared under heat stressed condition.

Biography

Her name is Ojo Olayinka Abosede (Nee Ogundumi). She has completed her Doctor of Philosophy, (Ph.D) in Animal Physiology, at the University of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. She has keen interest in reading, travelling with her family and getting solutions to eminent problems in the environment. She shuns cheating, castigation and relegating people’s personality, but embraces openesss and integrity. She is presently working in Kwara State University, Malete, Kwara State, Nigeria as a Lecturer, where she teaches Animal Physiology. She has published more than 15 papers in reputable journals. Her area of research interests are; Endocrinology, Reproductive Physiology and Phytochemistry.

Speaker
Ojo Olayinka Abosede / Kwara State University Nigeria

Abstract

Dietary Supplementation of Probiotics and Synbiotics on Intestinal Microbial Populations and Gut Morphology of Turkey Poults * Adebisi F. Agboola and Babatunde R. O. Omidiwura Department of Animal Science, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria *Corresponding author: Email: adebisi.agboola@gmail.com population and histomorphological indices was examined in a 56-day experiment using 128 seven-day-old turkey poults fed with antibiotic, probiotic or synbiotic supplemented diets. The experimental design was a Randomized Complete Block Design. Poults were brooded for 7 days, after which they were allotted to 4 dietary treatments with 4 replicates of 8 birds per replicate. Treatment 1 was the basal diet with no supplements while treatments 2, 3, and 4 were supplemented with antibiotics, probiotics and synbiotics respectively. On day 56, birds were slaughtered and digesta samples from the ileum were collected for microbial load count and intestinal pH. After flushing out the digesta samples, sections of the ileum (5cm posterior to Meckel’s diverticulum) were removed for ileal morphological measurements. Probiotic and synbiotic supplementation significantly (P<0.05) reduced the total coliform and total bacteria counts, meanwhile, lactic acid bacteria were significantly increased in birds on the experimental diets. The intestinal pH was slightly acidic across the treatment groups (6.45 – 6.83). However, the probiotic and symbiotic treatment groups had the lowest pH at 6.53 and 6.45 respectively. Probiotic and synbiotic supplementation significantly (P<0.05) improved the villus height and crypt depth of poults which was comparable to those on antibiotic diet. In summary, dietary inclusion of probiotics and synbiotics improved the overall gut integrity of the turkey poults as well as reduction in the populations of coliform and total bacteria, while the population of lactic acid bacteria was significantly increased.

Biography

Dr Adebisi F. Agboola, a nutritional biochemist and feed biotechnologist has completed her PhD from University of Ibadan. She holds various administrative positions in the University. She has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a reviewer for more than five reputable Journals. Dr Agboola is a versatile scientist who strives daily to expand her professional horizon through networking and exchange of ideas with colleagues from all over the world in a bid to contribute her quota in poverty alleviation through animal nutrition.

Speaker
Adebisi Favour Agboola / University of Ibadan Nigeria

Abstract

Building a collaborative cGMP facility as part of the Australian rapid vaccine production pipeline against emerging epidemic diseases George Lovrecz 1 , Jo Carina 1 , Keith Cappell 2 , Tram Phan 1 , Louis Lu 1 , Mylinh La 1 , Tam Pham 1 and Tim Adams 1 1 Biomedical Manufacturing, CSIRO, Australia 2 School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Australia A range of emerging epidemic infectious diseases (such as Lassa Fever, Filovirus pathogens, Zika) were identified by the World Health Organization. These diseases all could pose a significant threat to society and individuals. Management at an early stage of the potential outbreaks of these diseases is crucial to minimize their development into humanitarian crises. Unfortunately, there are many cases where market incentives alone do not foster vaccine development against these diseases. The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) aims to facilitate and finance the creation of new vaccines including their clinical testing and stockpiling. This seminar summarizes the Australian effort to create a collaborative vaccine development network to establish platform technologies and manufacturing capabilities that can be deployed rapidly against outbreaks of various pathogens. We will also discuss our current experience with recombinant glycoprotein-based vaccine candidates (Hendra and Ebola viruses) and suggest novel vaccine development ideas such as subunit vaccines and the ‘molecular clamp’ technology to build a successful vaccine development pipeline.

Biography

Professor George Lovrecz is a Senior Principal Research Scientist at CSIRO Manufacturing with over 30 year experience in fermentation, specialising in the scale-up of mammalian cell cultures. George provides expertise in the area of large-scale production, optimisation, development and characterisation of recombinant proteins for internal and external research collaborators both for academic and industrial projects. His laboratory has ISO9001 and veterinary cGMP accreditations to provide quality material for pre-clinical, toxicology and up to Phase- I clinical trials. George also has been involved in teaching and training at various organisations: UNSW, Victoria University (VU), University of Melbourne and he is an adjunct professor at RMIT and Monash Universities. George established the Annual Protein Expression Workshop (PEWS) at CSIRO Parkville, 19 years ago, which has grown to be one of the biggest science forum in this field in Australia.

Speaker
George Lovrecz / Monash Universitie Australia.

Abstract

Slow growing broilers and their benefits for an Animal Welfare Label Elke Rauch1, Christiane Keppler2, Klaus Damme3, Matthias Hausleitner4, Josef Bachmeier4, Michael Erhard1 und Helen Louton1 1Department of Veterinary Sciences, Chair of Animal Welfare, Ethology, Animal Hygiene and Animal Husbandry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, LMU Munich 2Landesbetrieb Landwirtschaft Hessen, Bildungs- und Beratungszentrum Fritzlar, Fritzlar, Germany 3Bayerische Landesanstalt für Landwirtschaft, Lehr-, Versuchs- und Fachzentrum für Geflügel- und Kleintierhaltung, Kitzingen, Germany 4Brüterei Süd ZN der BWE-Brüterei Weser-Ems GmbH & Co. KG, Regenstauf, Germany Problems of industrial livestock production have been examined and published in numerous studies and consumer awareness has therefore increased measurably (Deimel, 2010). Animal welfare is a complex subject, combining both physical strength and aspects of well-being. Broilers have species-specific needs for their well-being that have to be met in a suitable environment. That means that they should be able to run freely, flap their wings, peck, scratch, groom their plumage and rest and sleep undisturbed (Broom, 2001). In Germany, mainly fast growing breeds are used for meat production under conventional conditions. Their characteristics are a rapid growth, efficient feed conversion, robustness and good slaughtering results. Rapid growth and high weight can result in a higher physical load and health problems such as skeletal diseases and cardiovascular disorders. High weight and rapid growth are the main causes for gait problems of fast growing broiler breeds and partially prevent the animals from acting out their natural behavior due to physical restrictions. For this study, four slow growing commercial broiler breeds to be merchandised under an animal welfare label were examined for possible health problems. 750 unsexed broiler chicks of each of the breeds (Rowan Ranger, Hubbard, JA 957, Hubbard JA 987 and Cobb Sasso 175) were housed. 50 broilers each were examined after the fattening period (42 days) with regard to animal based welfare aspects. Additionally, litter quality, fattening performance and slaughter yield were measured. Hubbard JA 957 broilers performed the best gait (52% normal gait, 42% with mild inexplicit alteration). 90% of all assessed broilers met the list of criteria for a livestock-appropriate housing according to the animal welfare label by the German Animal Welfare Federation although the broilers of the breeds Rowan Ranger and Cobb Sasso 175 had a slightly poorer gait score. Only Hubbard JA 987 broilers did not meet the criteria. 26% of the broilers showed substantial deviations in their gait score. A significant correlation between the weight of the broilers and the gait score, the soiling of the plumage and the prevalence of hock burns could be found. Occasional alterations were observed in the foot pads Lesions could be found in 12% of the Cobb Sasso 175 broilers, where the litter quality was found the most humid. Similar effects could be detected concerning hock burns, though no significances occurred between the breeds. As a whole, all breeds comply with the requirements of the list of criteria regarding hock burns and foot pad dermatitis. Breeds with lower weight (Rowan Ranger and Hubbard JA 957) showed fewer skin scratches than those with higher weight (Cobb Sasso 175 and Hubbard JA 987). Comparing the above mentioned health parameters of slow growing broilers with those of fast growing breeds it is obvious that slow growing breeds have a measurably better animal well-being concerning the issue of foot health. It results in less food pad dermatitis and hock burns and therefore higher mobility.

Biography

Dr. Elke Rauch, veterinarian, completed her habilitation in 2017 at the Department of Veterinary Sciences, Chair of Animal Welfare, Ethology, Animal Hygiene and Animal Husbandry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, LMU Munich and is now a certified associate professor for Animal Welfare and Ethology. She is also a specialist for Animal Housing and Animal Hygiene in farm animals, especially for poultry and calves and is an advisory member of the committee of the German Animal Protection Association ("Deutscher Tierschutzbund e.V.") to establish the nationwide animal protection label "Für Mehr Tierschutz" ("For More Animal Protection") for broilers. Elke has published multiple research papers, reviews and spoken at numerous international congresses. She was awarded with a research prize by the International Society for Farm Animal of Livestock Husbandry (IGN) and the Animal Protection Award of the Bavarian State Government. Greets Elke Rauch

Speaker
Elke Rauch / München Germany

Plenary Talks

Abstract

A 2 × 2 factorial arrangement was designed to test effects of supplementation of a low (L, 75 mg/kg BW) vs. high (H, 150 mg/kg BW) L-arginine given at early (first 56 days) vs. late (last 56 days) pregnancy on maternal hormones and neonatal traits. Thirty Najdi pregnant ewes were randomly allocated into 6 groups. Ewes in G1 and G2 served as controls (C), given 50 ml saline at either early (CE) or late (CL) pregnancy, respectively. G3 and G4 ewes in early pregnancy received low (LE) and high L-arginine (HE), respectively. G5 and G6 ewes in late pregnancy received low (LL) and high (HL) L-arginine, respectively. A weekly blood sample was collected from initiation of the treatment till parturition. Serum growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), insulin, progesterone (P4) and estradiol 17 β (E2) profiles were determined. Neonatal traits were also determined. Insulin was higher (P < 0.05) in low arginine compared with control and high dosage. HL ewes (G6) exhibited increased (P < 0.05) IGF-I and decreased plasma E2. IGF-I increased and GH decreased at late pregnancy. The increase (P < 0.05) in plasma P4 between early and late pregnancy was slightly (P < 0.10) affected by L-arginine dosage. Low arginine increased (P < 0.05) birth weight by about 35% (4.86 kg) over the control (3.58 kg); whereas high arginine tended to increase birth weight (4.31 kg, P > 0.05). Lamb survival rates at birth in LE ewes were highest (100%) compared to other treatments. In conclusion, supplementing pregnant ewes with low dosage of L-arginine at early stage of gestation increased lamb birth weight and survival, and improved maternal health

Biography

Dr. Moustafa M. Zeitoun graduated from Alexandria University, Egypt in Animal Production in 1978 with a grade of excellent with honor. He obtained an M. Sc. in Buffalo reproduction (1984) and awarded a scholarship for conducting his Ph. D program in the USMARC, Clay center, NE, USA (1990) in embryo transfer in beef cattle. His Ph.D. study was chosen as one of the best articles in the international embryo transfer society meeting, Fort Collins, Colorado 1987. He was awarded a peace fellowship in 1993 to the department of animal sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ USA where he has done a research on the effect of hot climate on the cow’s embryo quality. In 1994 he was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to the University of Texas A&M to study the follicular dynamics of Brahman beef cows. Dr. Zeitoun has been awarded the University of Alexandria Promotion prize in 1998. He was appointed as a demonstrator and assistant lecturer in the Department of Animal and Fish Production, Faculty of Agriculture, Alexandria University, Egypt. After he gained his Ph.D. degree he joined the Department of Animal and Fish Production as an assistant professor (1990), associate professor (1996) and served as a full professor in animal reproduction between 2002 up to 2006 when he joined the University of Qassim, KSA. He and 3 of his colleagues were awarded the Thomas Edison’s award in veterinary sciences in 2014. He serves as an editor in different international accredited animal sciences and biomedical journals. He has advised 25 M. Sc. and Ph. D. students in Egypt and Saudi Arabia and published more than 75 articles in the area of animal physiology and human nutrition. He translated a book (Veterinary Reproductive Ultrasonography) to the Arabic language, being the sole Arabic text in this area.

Speaker
Moustafa M. Zeitoun / Qassim University
Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Biography

Prof. A.V. Sirotkin, PhD, DrSc is working as Professor at the Constantine the Philosopher University. His area of interests are the effect of environmental factors on reproduction and its endocrine and intracellular mechanisms of action. He has about 630 publications including 130 full papers in the international journals. He is a member of editorial boards of 4 international journals and a recipient of more than 10 national and international awards.

Speaker
Alexander V. Sirotkin / Constantine the Philosopher University Slovak Republic

Abstract

Biography

will be updated

Speaker
Ahmad Abdulaziz AlAl-Ghaneim / Qassim University Saudi Arab

Sessions:

Abstract

The production of chicken meat is based on two very important assumptions. The first is the impeccable biological quality of one-day fattening chickens, which includes the correct period of incubation of breeding eggs, adequate transport to fattening objects, proper reception and accommodation during fattening. The second assumption is the optimal realization of all elements of production technology, which among other things; include numerous preventive measures before and during the fattening period. Preventive measures are a strong link between the two very important and stated assumptions. The final results of fattening highly depend on their success or failure. Production and technological principles, regarding the organization and implementation of preventive measures in broiler production are clear and are based on general and special preventive measures. Numerous general preventive measures should ensure the reduction of nonspecific attacks to the health of broilers, while special prevention measures are based on programmatic implementation of vaccine interventions in broiler chickens in order to prevent the detrimental effects of certain causes of specific diseases. While the measures of special prophylaxis are adapted to local epidemiological conditions, the implementation of measures of general prophylaxis rests globally on an established matrix. This is done by adequate preparation of the objects, which should result in effective disinfection of all media and surfaces where chickens, when immigrating, come in contact, and preventive treatments of the chickens themselves, whose implementation begins immediately upon the migration. Unfortunately, in production practice, both in our country and in the world, it is common practice to use broad spectrum antibiotics for preventative purposes through drinking water. Also, through drinking water, numerous burdensome commercial preparations, such as liposoluble vitamins, and other nutritional supplements, including amino acids and fatty acids, are applied thru it. In our experiments we used the disinfectant "Dioxy Activ Supra" line for disinfection of objects, equipment in them, but also for the water distribution system, or liquid disinfection of drinking water during the whole fattening process. For preventative purposes, experimental chickens were treated with probiotic preparations, the line "Actiferm" via drinking water, instead of antibiotics, liposoluble vitamins and other commercial nutritional supplements. This approach to the organization of preventive measures before and during the fattening resulted in a 38% lower mortality, 24% higher body weight, 20% better food conversion, and overall better health and technology indicators of fattening for experimental chickens.

Biography

Ajla Ališah holds the title of Master of Science in „Ethology and animal welfare“. She works as a senior assistant on subjects „Ethology and animal welfare“, and „Zoohigene and prophylaxis of animal diseases“. Since 2016., she is a doctoral student in the field of „Veterinary medicine and public health“.

Speaker
Ajla Ališah / Bosnia and Herzegovina

Abstract

The profit of dairy farm depends on the production of more calf and more milk from the dairy cows with optimum fertility management. Repeat breeding syndrome and mastitis are very important diseases of dairy cows. Studies on relation between repeat breeding syndrome and mastitis and on hormonal profiles specially prolactin (PRL), progesterone (P4) and estrogen (E2) in mastitis affected cows are very scanty. Therefore, a correlative study on mastitis and repeat breeding syndrome was conducted to observe and compare the reproductive and productive performances of normal, repeat breeder and mastitis affected repeat breeder cows. Prolactin, P4 and E2 profile of normal, repeat breeder and mastitis affected repeat breeder cows were also monitored during estrous cycle. Data were collected from the farmers of 74 dairy farms among which 61 of Patiya and Karnaphuli upazila of Chattogram district and 13 of Sadar Upazila of Mymensingh district by using the questionnaire developed by research team. Total 90 lactating cows were selected and included to study the productive and reproductive performances of the cows. Cows were divided into four groups named as G1-Normal cyclic cows (n=24), G2-Repeat breeder cows (n=24), G3-Repeat breeder cows with sub-clinical mastitis (n=22), G4-Repeat breeder cows with clinical mastitis (n=20). Serum level prolactin, P4 and E2 were analyzed in all cows. Age variation was significantly higher between normal cyclic cows and repeat breeder cows. Among RB cows higher age was observed in SCM and CM affected repeat breeder cows. Among RB cows with or without mastitis, we did not observe any significant (p>0.05) differences in parameters in term of sexual maturity, first calving age, gestation length, parity, calving interval and voluntary waiting period. No significant (p>0.05) variation was found in daily milk production and lactation length recorded for RB cows with or without mastitis. Among RB groups, pregnant RB cows with mastitis had significantly higher prolactin level (G-3=16.30±0.48, G-4= 15.59±1.15 ng/ml) and lower estrogen level (G-3=14.59±2.22, G-4=13.86±0.55 pg/ml) than pregnant RB cows without mastitis (PRL=11.77±0.29 ng/ml; E2=16.15±0.18 pg/ml) respectively at the time of AI. Moreover, higher level of E2 was observed at metestrus stage in RB cows with mastitis. Pearson’s correlation revealed significant positive relation of prolactin with P4, milk production (MP), lactation length (LL) and voluntary waiting period (VWP); of P4 with MP; of E2 with estrus duration (ED). Whereas, strong negative relation among prolactin and P4 with E2 and ED; of E2 with MP, LL and VWP was found in this study. This result suggests to consider hormonal profiles during the management of the mastitis to improve the reproductive performances of dairy cows

Biography

Dr. Nasrin Sultana Juyena, Professor of Theriogenology in the Department of Surgery and Obstetrics, Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU), Mymensingh-2202, Bangladesh. She graduated from Faculty of Veterinary Science, BAU in 1998 and joined as a Lecturer in the Department of Surgery and Obstetrics, BAU in 2000. She has completed her PhD from University of PAdova, Italy. She has promoted as a Professor in the same department in 2015.Her interests: Theriogenology and assisted reproductive technology in ruminants. She has published over 44 papers and has successfully completed 5 research projects. She supervised over 26 masters students.Currently, 3 doctoral fellows are doing their research under her supervision. She has been also serving as Editor of Bangladesh Veterinay Journal, an official journal of Bangladesh Veterinary Association.

Speaker
Nasrin Sultana Juyena / Bangladesh Agricultural University,Mymensingh-2202, BANGLADESH

Abstract

The lack of new antibiotic classes calls for a cautious use of existing agents. Yet, every 10 min, almost two tons of antibiotics are used around the world, all too often without any prescription or control. The use, overuse and misuse of antibiotics select for resistance in numerous species of bacteria which then renders antimicrobial treatment ineffective. Almost all countries face increased antimicrobial resistance (AMR), not only in humans but also in livestock and along the food chain. The spread of AMR is fueled by growing human and animal populations, uncontrolled contamination of fresh water supplies, and increases in international travel, migration and trade. Antibiotics need to be banned as growth promoters for farm animals in countries where it has not yet been done. Antimicrobial stewardship programmes in animal husbandry have proved to be efficient for minimising AMR, without compromising productivity. Regarding the use of antibiotics in humans, new tools to provide highly specific diagnoses of pathogens can decrease diagnostic uncertainty and improve clinical management. Finally, infection prevention and control measures – some of them as simple as hand hygiene – are essential and should be extended beyond healthcare settings. Aside from regulatory actions, all people can assist in AMR reduction by limiting antibiotic use for minor illnesses. Together, we can all work to reduce the burden of AMR.

Biography

Yousria Ahmed Osman , student , attended to benha university in Egypt, In my faculty we made a lot of veterinary activities and projects. To our community, Held many awareness campaign talking about zoonoses, how to avoid infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance . Volunteer and veterinarian assistant in animal care center in my town, we help stray dogs and cats for no money. Also I get trained in a public pharmacy as summer training for 3 months. I dream of completing my studies abroad then found my animal care center, be one of the stakeholders of global health in WHO, and may be a minister of health in my country one day, Why not!

Speaker
Yousria Ahmed Osman / Benha University,Egypt

Will be updated soon...