Plenary Talks

Abstract

The Charnley hip implant revolutionized medicine returning motor function to millions. Over the decades since the Charnley hip implant was first introduced to medicine, numerous researchers have tried to improve the functionality of hip implants, from changing chemistry, geometry, surface texture, and even using injectable chemistries. This talk will summarize some of the more promising advances, in particular what has been seen with nanotechnology (or the use of materials with at least one dimension less than 100nm). Specifically, increased bone formation, decreased infection, and reduced inflammation have all been observed by employing nanoscale surface features (and without drugs) on the traditional Charnley implant regardless of chemistry. This talk will cover such results emphasizing those which have received FDA approval and are currently helping hundreds of patients return to an active lifestyle. Moreover, this talk will discuss the fundamental reasons why nanotechnology is so promising in orthopedic medical device applications.

Biography

Thomas J. Webster�s (H index: 88) degrees are in chemical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh (B.S., 1995) and in biomedical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (M.S., 1997; Ph.D., 2000). Prof. Webster has graduated/supervised over 149 visiting faculty, clinical fellows, post-doctoral students, and thesis completing B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. students. To date, his lab group has generated over 13 textbooks, 68 book chapters, 376 invited presentations, at least 503 peer-reviewed literature articles and/or conference proceedings, at least 767 conference presentations, and 42 provisional or full patents. He is the founding editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Nanomedicine (pioneering the open-access format). Prof. Webster currently directs or co-directs several centers in the area of biomaterials: The Center for Natural and Tropical Biomaterials (Medellin, Colombia), The Center for Pico and Nanomedicine (Wenzhou China), and The International Materials Research Center (Soochow, China). He has received numerous honors and is current a fellow of AANM, AIMBE, BMES, IJN, NAI, RSM, and FSBE.

Speaker
Thomas J. Webster / Northeastern University, USA

Abstract

Biography

Professor Haitao Ye joined the Department of Engineering at the University of Leicester as the Chair in Materials Engineering in April 2018. Prior to that, he was a Reader and Nanoscience Research Group Convener at Aston University, Birmingham. He was employed as Research Fellow /Senior Research Fellow at London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, following the completion of an Industrial Research Fellowship at the Basic Research Labs of Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corporation (Japan).

Speaker
Haitao Ye / University of Leicester, UK

Abstract

Biography

Director of the postdoc school in a CEEX project entitled „Micro and nanostructured elaborated via chemical and electrochemical bioactivation with application in regenerative medicine.Expert evaluator and monitor of national (RELANSIN, MENER, BIOTECH, MATNANTEC) and international projects (LEONARDO Da VINCI, CORINT, Czech Science Foundation, Invited lecture or/and chair person in Conferences and Universities (SUA, Poland, Mexic, Greece, 2010 Hong Kong (2010), Egipt, France, Kuala Lumpur,Great Britain, Denmark (2014), Italy, China (2015), China 2016The Netherlands (2016),Prague 2017, JEJU ( KOREEA ) 2018. Expert in POSDRU Projects. Expert in UNIDO, FP6 and Leonardo da Vinci projects. Member of Romanian Chemistry Society, member of Romanian Biomaterials Society, member ISI ( International Electrochemistry Society), Member of Committee of APCBEES( Asia Pacific Chemistry Biological & Environmental Society), member of International Bionic Society. member of editorial board for Nanobiomedicine (Japan) and of J.of Roumanian Biophysics editor for Coatings ( Special Issue) Micro and Nanocoatings for technological and biomedical applications .Reviewer for J.Nanoparticles research, Biomaterials, Corr. Sci., Electrochimica Acta, J. Non Crystalline solids, Appl. Surf. Sci., Surf. and Coating Tech, Rev. Chim., J.Synthetic metals, Arab.J.of Chemistry, Non crystalyne solids, Mater Chem. and Phys, J. Biosci. Bioeng., J. Mater. Sci. Mater. Medicine, J. Colloid Interface B, Sci Reports J. Nanomaterials, J of Ceramics International. Chairperson and/or member in scientific committee International Conferences Romania, (RICCCE 2005,2007,2009,2011), Greece (Duracosys 2010), Egipt(2011), Hong Kong(2010), Thailanda (International Conference on Biotechnology and Environment Management - ICBEM 2012), Denmark (International Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Technology ICBET May 2013 Copenhagen) France (Medical and Bioscience Conference Paris October 2013),Great Britain (2014 4th International Conference on Environmental, Biomedical and Biotechnology, ICEBB 2014 July Nottingham) Italy (May 2015 Florence),The Netherlands (Amsterdam March 2016), Prague 2017 China (5th International Conference on Bionic Eng. 2016), etc. Awards -Silver medal at Geneva International Saloon of Inventions ( 2002) .WOMPI premium at Geneva International Saloon of Inventions ( 2011 ).Premium of Romanian Society of Biomaterials Daniel Bunea 2011.Over 50 papers have CNCS prize, the majority of them being from the red zone and having influence score higher than 1 (Ioana Demetrescu as principal author). Honorary Professor „Dunarea de Jos” University .Corespondent member of Academy of Romanian Scientists. Articles 192 ISI publications starting 1977 and 1600 citations. Research projects:Participation in more than 100 projects at national and international level including, UNIDO, Leonardo da Vinci, FP6, CNCSIS, VIASAN, CEEX, PCE, PCCE, etc ; in the period 2006-2019 Director of 15projects, (2 international cooperation with France and Argentina in the field of biomaterials and 13 national). International cooperation France, Spain,Greece, Germany, Japan, Portugal, Argentina, Findland. Publications : Books Participation in elaboration of 18 books including chapters at international level. Patents 9 patents in materials Science.

Speaker
Demetrescu Ioana / Politehnica University of Bucharest, Romania

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Among adult mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) hold great promise in tissue engineering and cell therapy. Adult mesenchymal stem cells can overcome the legal and ethical issues associated with the use of embryonic stem cells, and the risk of tumorigenicity of induced pluripotent stem cells. In addition, these cells can be used in autologous form. ADSCs are advantageous because they can be obtained in a relatively large quantities and by a less invasive method, i.e. from subcutaneous fat obtained by liposuction. These cells have the capacity to differentiate into various cell types, which can be facilitated by suitable mechanical stimulation, coupled with appropriate composition of the cell culture media. In our experiments, the differentiation of ADSCs towards vascular smooth muscle cells has been achieved by pulse pressure stimulation in a custom-designed bioreactor, or by uniaxial stretching in the commercially available STREX system, combined with the presence of TGF-beta1 and BMP-4 in the culture medium [1, 2]. ADSCs also differentiated relatively easily towards osteoblasts, which was facilitated by vibrational stress in combination with osteogenic media containing dexamethasone, β-glycerol phosphate, ascorbic acid, and in some cases also L-glutamine and dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1-3]. The differentiation of ADSCs towards cells with polarity, i.e. with functional specialization of the basal and apical cell membrane, such as vascular endothelial cells and keratinocytes, is considered to be difficult, but it can be facilitated by laminar shear stress in the case of endothelial cells, and by uniaxial strain or by pressure stress in the case of keratinocytes [1]. This review lecture summarizes recent knowledge on differentiation of ADSCs towards various cell types, supported by appropriate dynamic loading.

Biography

Lucie Bacakova, MD, PhD, Assoc. Prof. has graduated from the Faculty of General Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czechoslovakia in 1984. She has completed her Ph.D at the age of 32 years from the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, and became Associated Professor at the 2nd Medical Faculty, Charles University. She is the Head of the Department of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. She is a specialist for studies on cell-material interaction and vascular, bone and skin tissue engineering. She has published more than 150 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Lucie Bacakova / Institute of Physiology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic

Abstract

Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a new additive manufacturing technique that allows solids with complex geometry to be fabricated by annealing metal powder microparticles in a focused laser beam, according to a computer-generated three-dimensional model. The fabrication process involves the laser-induced fusion of metal microparticles, in order to build, layer by layer, the desired object. With DMLS, it is possible to fabricate titanium implants with an inherently porous surface, a key property required of implantation devices. Human histologic/histomorphometric studies have demonstrated the potential of DMLS implants to osseointegrate in human bone under different loading conditions. Clinical studies have confirmed a high success rate for DMLS titanium implants used in different clinical contexts, and under different protocols. Finally, with DMLS, patient-specific implants (root-analogues, blade and maxillofacial implants) can be produced, adapting the implant to the anatomy of the patient instead of adapting the patient�s bone to a preformed standardized fixture.

Biography

Dr. Francesco Mangano was born in 1979 on the Lake of Como, Italy. He graduated at the University of Milan in 2003 (110/110 cum laude). Immediately after graduation, he devoted his attention to Implant Dentistry, attending the Post-graduate Program in Oral Implantology and Bone Regeneration of the Oral Implantology Clinic, Department of Periodontology, Dental Research Division, Guarulhos University, Sao Paulo (Brazil), where he became Clinical Instructor. After this experience, he worked intensively in the field of Implant Prosthodontics and Digital Dentistry. He is Lecturer for the Academic Unit of Digital Dentistry, IRCCS, San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, (Italy), Founder and Scientific Coordinator of the first-in-the-world 2-year Master in Digital Dentistry, at the University of Varese (Italy). In 2016, he completed his PhD in Biotechnologies, Biosciences and Surgical Techniques, at the Department of Surgical and Morphological Sciences, University of Varese (Italy). From 2018, he is Associate Professor and Lecturer at the Sechenov First State Medical University of Moscow, Russia. He is Section Editor for the Digital Dentistry Section of BMC Oral Health, Associate Editor for Journal of Dental Research, Dental Clinics, Dental Prospects, and Lead Guest Editor of International Journal of Dentistry, Biomedical Research International (Tissue Engineering Section) and The Open Dentistry Journal; in addition, he works as Reviewer for the most important international, peer-reviewed journals with high impact factor. He is Fellow of the International College of Dentists, and Founding and Board Member of the international Digital Dentistry Society (DDS). He is author of 100 scientific publications indexed in Pubmed, and published on international peer-reviewed Journals with high impact factor. His bibliometric indexes are: impact factor 177.5 (Researchgate), H index 31 (Google Scholar). He co-authored three books on implant dentistry and guided implant surgery. He is in private practice in Gravedona, Como, Italy, together with Prof. Carlo Mangano, his uncle and mentor.

Speaker
Francesco Guido Mangano / Sechenov First State Medical University of Moscow,Russia

Abstract

The fabrication of nanoporous / nanoparticulate composites and their applications via surface patterning with chemicals and bio-chemicals has a direct impact in bio-sensing and bio-separation. Surface patterning on nanoparticles in suspension can be a complex process due to the aggregation of the particles and their Brownian motion in the suspension. An overview of group�s research on nanomaterials and their applications in the separation of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) from the biological cells will be presented in connection with an industrial collaboration with Q-Bioanalytic, Germany. The possibility of affinity interaction of biomolecules i.e. nucleic acid, protein, antibody, microorganisms etc. through hybrid capture will also be discussed in the context of food quality and hygiene in Bio-sensing which has recently been published in Nature publishing group (http://www.nature.com/srep/2012/120807/srep00564/full/srep00564.html?WT.ec_id=SREP-639-20120903). Separation of toxic and microbial contaminants from water and soil using nanotechnology tool will be discussed in the context of on-going multinational projects (http://senlabs.org/international-projects/ & http://nanowateratuclan.org/) in collaboration with top academic and industrial researchers from Europe, India and China. Recent development (UK Patent: 2013: GB1315407.5. & PCT/GB2014/052,630) on sensing antimicrobial nanocomposites will be discussed in connection with water technology.

Biography

Dr. Tapas Sen completed his first degree in Chemistry (BSc. Hons) followed by a Masters in Physical Chemistry (MSc) and a PhD in Materials Chemistry from the premier research institution, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune, India. He worked at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel during 1997 to 1999 in the world leading Solid state NMR group as a post-doctoral visiting scientist. He then moved to UK in February 2000 and worked as a postdoctoral Research Fellow in the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST), Manchester (2000-2003) on an industrial project funded by ICI Synetix. He later worked on multimillion Euro projects under EU framework V and VI programmes (2003-2008) in various parts of UK before joining as a lecturer in Chemistry (December 2008) at the University of Central Lancashire. Currently he is leading the Nano-biomaterials Research group dedicated on researching in the area of nanomaterials and their applications in separation science, drug delivery, industrial catalysis and bio-sensors. Currently the group is running three multinational projects in collaboration with world leaders from academia and industries.

Speaker
Tapas Sen / University of Central Lancashire, UK

Abstract

Recent advances and applications of biomolecule-responsive hydrogels in medicine via emphasizing this research area with novel biomaterials technology have shown great interest in medical applications. Protein-responsive hydrogels are classified into two major types, including enzyme-responsive hydrogels and antigen-responsive hydrogels. In the present study, we willdiscuss the recent applications of nucleic acid-responsive hydrogels based on four main categories: RNA-responsive hydrogels, DNA-responsive hydrogels, aptamer-responsive hydrogels and PNA-responsive hydrogels. We will further show the recent application of these modifiedhydrogelsindrug/gene delivery, diabetes, biosensor, tissue engineering, and cell and cancer area.

Biography

Dr. Hosseinkhani has broad experience in life sciences and is expert in nanotechnology, biomaterials, drug delivery, 3D in vitro systems, bioreactor technology, and bioengineering stem cells technology. He has long experience in both academia and industry in biomedical engineering research and development, which includes several years of basic science research experience in a number of premier institutions related to the structure and function of biomaterials, and in polymer-based and mineral-based medical implants development in the medical device industry.He has been awarded several prestigious fellowships including JSPS Fellowship of Japan, and European Marie Curie Fellowship. Dr. Hosseinkhani has several issued/pending U.S. patentsand has authored over 100 international publications in prestigious international journals and over 200 presentations at international conferences. He is the founder and chief science officer at Matrix, Inc. a world leading biotech company dedicated to healthcare technology to improve patient's quality of life.

Speaker
Hossein Hosseinkhani / Founder & Chief Science Officer, Matrix, Inc, USA

Abstract

Co-ordination assisted self-assembly of the macromolecules is one of the unique attributes to accomplish a stimuli-responsive monodispersednano-formulation (NF) applicable in biomedicines. The stimuli-responsive structural reorganization of these NF's draws anenormous attention in the field of NF based biotherapy. Herein we report two different types of smart-formulation showing stimuli-responsive structural articulation followed improvised in the specific biological environments. Firstly, the macromolecule, pentaerythritol poly(caprolactone)-b-poly(acrylic acid) form Fe+3 ion induced light-responsive NF with the unique structural arrangement as like spherically shaped human brain. The DOX (chemo therapeutic agent)-loaded NF undergoes structural deformation in the presence of light and shows a release of DOX molecule (85.2% at 120 min). Administration of the DOX-loaded NF to C6 glioma rat model (in vivo) offered tremendous inhibition (∼91%) of tumor growth without any toxic side effects. Secondly, mannose conjugated antimicrobial polypeptide, poly(arginine-r-valine)-mannose undergoes Zn2+ ion induced self-assembly into a NF with a unique structural appearance as like Taxus baccata fruits. The NF uptake by the bacterial membrane led structural deformation followed by exposing of free polypeptide molecules. These molecules are enforced to lysis the bacterial membrane followed by diffusion of cytoplasmic component out of the membrane that culminates final death of bacteria (MIC values varies from 0.67 to 2.55 µM). Indeed, NF’s remainnon-toxic against both the mammalian as well as red blood cell as reflected from their higher order of cell viability (˃ 80%) and very insignificant hemolytic effect (˂13%). Hence, metal ion assisted self-assembly approach brings about a new therapeutic window, where the fully exposed macromolecule can be formulated into compact NF with enhanced therapeutic performance.

Biography

Prof. (Dr.) Santanu Chattopadhyay is associated with Rubber Technology Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, WB, India for last 15 years. Currently he is Professor and Head of Rubber Technology Centre. He is also an adjunct Professor of School of Nano Science and Technology, IIT Kharagpur. Before that, he worked as postdoctoral research associate at Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA for two years and postdoctoral fellow at The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada for two years. He completed his PhD in 2001 from Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, WB, India and M.Tech from Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai, India. He also did Masters in Chemistry from Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, WB, India and Bachelors from University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India. His research interests cover the area of synthesis and characterisation of block copolymers, biomaterials, and polymers for health care as well as energy harvesting. He is also working on smart rubber composites and FEA of rubbery/textile materials. He has remarkable publications in the reputed international journals like Chemistry of Materials, ACS Applied Materials Interfaces, Biomaterials, Langmuir, Macromolecules, RSC Advances and others in the field of biomaterials along with publications in the field of polymers, rubbers and nanocomposites. He has more than 120 journal and 75 conference publications, four book chapters and two patents. He has guided 14 PhD students and 17 PhD are ongoing. Currently, he is also acting as one of the editorial board members of Journal of Advanced Biotechnology and Bioengineering and reviewing manuscripts for 19 international journals

Speaker
Santanu Chattopadhyay / Rubber Technology Center, India

Abstract

Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are the most common bacterial virulence proteins and play a significant role in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections; thus, PFTs are an attractive therapeutic target in bacterial infections. Inspired by the pore-forming process and mechanism of PFTs, we designed two RBC-mimicking liposomes�the erythroliposome and the erythrosome�for PFT detoxification by fusing natural red blood cell (RBC) membranes or RBC membrane proteins with artificial lipid membranes. With α-hemolysin (Hlα) as a model PFT, we demonstrated that both the erythroliposome and the erythrosome could not only significantly reduce the toxicity of Hlα to erythrocytes in vitro but also effectively sponge Hlα in vivo and rescue mice from Hlα-induced damage. Consequently, the RBC-mimicking liposome nanoplatform inspires potential strategies for antivirulence therapy.

Biography

Ph.D Zhiqing Pang is an associate researcher of School of Pharmacy, Fudan University. He obtianed his Ph.D. in Pharmaceutics from Fudan University in 2008. His research mainly focuses on smart drug delivery systems especially in brain drug delivery. He published >100 peer-review scientific papers, with citation by >4,500 times (H-index~39); coedited 4 books in English and 3 books in Chinese. His scientific achievements have been honored by some scientific awards in China, including National Award for Science and Technology (2018); Distinguished Young Scholar of Chinese Pharmaceutical Association-Sanofi (2017), Natural Science Award of Ministry of Education (2010).

Speaker
Zhiqing Pang / Fudan University, China

Sessions:

Abstract

Currently the medical practice does not offer curative treatments or alterations of the natural history of diseases, what we have is the palliation of disease progression and control of its damage. Absolutely every hospital is a potential center of translational research, the richness of genotypes and epigenotypes cannot be dismissed as merely an individual who fits the changes already described and seen by medical practice. The Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo is part of the Sorocaba Hospital Complex, a unit of national relevance for the treatment of patients. Our Biomaterials Laboratory conducts human cell culture and development of materials capable of repairing tissues. improvement of patients' quality of life. Tumor banks, PLDLA bone regeneration, PLDLA-TMC cartilaginous regeneration, collagen-PVA dermal matrix for burned areas, plates and screws for bucomaxillofacial lesions composes the research lines of our Laboratory. Biodesigning and biomimetization are key stages of the research design process that meet hospital demands. We conducted the study of micro and macro anatomy, pathophysiology, culture of tumor cells to design innovative and translational therapies for hospital applications. Bringing the clinical staff from the hospital to the Laboratory is essential for both teams to realize the power and relevance of their performance, in this way there is the exchange between bench and bedside. In this model patients provide cells to study solutions and benefit themselves and other patients who are in a correlated condition. The translational medicine have a essential hole to develop medicine, the patients can’t wait traditional research process.

Biography

Igor de Oliveira Roversi, Doctor of Medicine (M.D.), from Pontifical Catholic University of Sao Paulo (PUCSP), Medical Researcher in Laboratory of Biomaterials at Faculty of Medicine focusing in hydrogels, PLDLA and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells for bone and cartilage tissue engineering. Member of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society (TERMIS) Chapter Europe, presenting at Rhodes (Greece) Congress 2019. Visiting speaker at Kemicentrum in Lund University, Sweden. Actually occupying the position of Chief Executive Officer of Vividess, a startup of Translational Medicine using novel polymers for medical devices.

Speaker
Igor de Oliveira Roversi / Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo, Brazil

Abstract

Introduction: Acid-base equilibrium is one of the most important factors that influence behaviors of bone cells. In scenario of osteoporotic fracture, significantly higher activity of osteoclasts than osteoblasts may lead to continuous loss of bone in fracture/defect site. In that case, we propose modulating the microenvironment pH (μe-pH) of that milieu, which is influenced by implants surface chemistry and biodegradation, to re-establish normal bone regeneration at the fracture site. Methods: In our series studies, the measurement of material interfacial pH was realized by using the pH microelectrode. In vitro and in vivo examinations were conducted for evaluating the pH’s effect on defect regeneration process in both normal/pathological conditions. Results: We demonstrated that the pH at the material surface is different from that of a homogeneous bulk extract at an early stage in vitro, and the altered local pH affects significantly the proliferation and ALP activity of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells. We have further revealed that the weakly-alkaline surface pH (pH 8–8.5) showed most stimulated effect on MC-3T3 cells viability and activity, thus further facilitating apatite nucleation. The increased culture environment pH has also been proved to stimulate osteogenic differentiation of osteoporosis bone marrow stromal cells (pH 7.73-7.94), and suppress the differentiation and pit-formation activity of RAW 264.7 osteoclast precursors (pH 7.59-8.02). In vivo, alkaline biodegradable materials generated a μe-pH which was higher than the normal physiological value, in particular, at the initial stage. Higher μe-pH is associated with better overall performances: greater new bone formation, suppression the activity of TRAP+ osteoclast-like cells, as well as the formation of an intermediate ‘apatitic’ layer. The osteoclastic associated enzymes have been proved to be greatly involved in the pH-related suppression effect towards osteoclasts.

Biography

Prof. Haobo Pan completed his PhD studies at the University of Hong Kong in 2007, and carried out his postdoctoral research at the Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine in the University of Hong Kong from 2008 to 2010. In 2010, he promoted to Research Assistant Professor at the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology in the University of Hong Kong. In 2012, he was appointed as the Director of the Research Center in Human Tissues and organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science. Later, he was promoted as the Vice Director of the Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology and appointed as the Director of Shenzhen Key laboratory in Marine Biomaterials and the Director of Technology Center of Guangdong Province Marine Biological Materials Engineering. His current research activities are focused on material chemistry, biomaterial synthesis and modification, marine biotechnology, biomaterial zoology and clinical assessment. He has published more than 100 papers in qualified international journals and served as board member of ISRN Biomaterials and Journal of Osteoporosis and Physical Activity.

Speaker
Haobo Pan / Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

Abstract

Superelastic NiTi alloy is the current primer material used in an extensive variety of biomedical and dental applications, mainly due to its exceptional superelasticity. However, the toxicity of Ni and the large Ni content of NiTi (~51 at.%) are concerning. Hence, a large number of Ni-free biocompatible superelastic alloys have been developed in recent years, out of which only a few exhibit superelasticity that is comparable with that (~7%) of NiTi. The large superelasticity exhibited by these alloys is attributed to a strong recrystallization texture induced by severe mechanical processing. Here we present a novel class of Sn-containing solute-lean Ti alloys which offer excellent superelasticity (~5%) without a crystallographic texture. The influence of Sn content on superelasticity, mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms in these alloys will be discussed. Also discussed are the superior mammalian cell response and corrosion resistance of these alloys compared with NiTi. These considerations indicate the potential of these novel alloys for biomedical cardiovascular, bone-replacement and dental implant applications.

Biography

Mr Ali Ramezannejad is a current PhD student at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT University). His PhD research is focused on design and development of new biomedical nickel-free titanium alloys with desirable superelasticity and superior biocompatibility and corrosion resistance compared with that of the NiTi alloy.

Speaker
Ali Ramezannejad / Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia

Abstract

Modern medicine has achieved great advances with the introduction of biomaterials to support or restore human body functions. A major problem emerging from the increasing use of biomaterial implants and medical devices is biomaterial-associated infections (BAI). Indeed, microorganisms are able to reach the surface of a biomaterial, adhere to it and form a so-called biofilm, a microconsortia of surface adhering cells enclosed in a self-produced matrix. BAI are extremely difficult to treat, as this biofilm mode of growth offers protection against the host immune system and antimicrobial treatment. Surface modification of biomaterials to impart them with the ability to resist or prevent bacterial adhesion represents the most attractive and fruitful approach to fight BAI and several strategies have been proposed. In the last years, a mussel-inspired coating strategy has been the matter of great attention due to its inherent ability to form multifunctional coatings on a wide range of materials, using a simple dip-coating procedure. In my group, this coating strategy has been applied for the immobilization of alternatives to antibiotics such as antimicrobial peptides, matrix-disruptive enzymes, antifungals and antiseptics on polymeric (polycarbonate, polydimethylsiloxane and polyvinyl chloride) and metallic (stainless steel) surfaces. It was possible to immobilize these compounds onto biomaterial surfaces without compromise their activity and rendering their surfaces with good anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm features, together with no cytotoxicity towards mammalian cells. The subsequent step on this research was to come up with a model to investigate the fate of the small fraction of bacteria that managed to adhere onto these antimicrobial coatings. In this piece of research, we focused on the importance of further investigating the fate of adhered cells found on these coatings: are they more susceptible to antibiotic treatment or did they develop some resistant phenotype? Also, are they more probe to be cleared by the host immune system? For our coating strategy, results showed that the small fraction of adhered bacteria did not develop resistance towards the compounds immobilized, being even more susceptible to antibiotic chemotherapy. Moreover, the modified surfaces obtained so far did not compromise the action of host immune cells. Overall our results added value to this antimicrobial coating strategy, strengthening these functionalized surfaces as good candidates for in vivo assays and its ultimate clinical applications.

Biography

Speaker
Maria Olivia Pereira / University of Minho, Portugal

Abstract

A folic acid (FA) functional drug delivery system (MT@LPTX@FA) based on in situ formation of tellurium nanodots (Te NDs) in paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded MgAl layered double hydroxide (LDHs) gated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) has been designed and fabricated for targeted chemo/PDT/PTT trimode combinatorial therapy. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), N2 adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, and UV-vis spectra were used to demonstrate the successful fabrication of MT@L-PTX@FA. In particular, the in situ generated Te NDs showed a homogeneous ultrasmall size. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, photothermal effects, and photostability evaluations indicated that the in situ generated homogeneous Te NDs could serve as the phototherapeutic agent, converting the photon energy to ROS and heat under nearinfrared (NIR) irradiation efficiently. The drug-release test revealed that MT@L-PTX@FA showed an apparent sustained release character in a pH-sensitive manner. In addition, cell imaging experiments demonstrated that MT@L-PTX@FA could selectively enter into cancer cells owing to the function of FA and release of PTX efficiently for chemotherapy for the reason that the low intracellular pH would dissolve MgAl LDHs to Mg2+ and Al3+. Cytotoxicity tests also indicated that MT@L-PTX@FA exhibited enhanced therapeutic effect in cancer cells under NIR irradiation, benefiting from the synergy based on targeted chemo/PDT/PTT trimode combinatorial therapy. The preliminary results reported here will shed new light on the future design and applications of nanosystems for synergistic combinatorial therapy.

Biography

Shiguo Sun has completed his PhD from Dalian University of Technology, China and postdoctoral studies from Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden. He is a professor and doctoral supervisor at the College of Chemistry & Pharmacy, Northwest A&F University, China. He has published more than 150 papers in reputed journals. His research interests include Systematic Targeting Pharmaceutics (STP); Visible Sensor Guided Drug Delivery and Targeting; Fluorescent Probe and Imaging; Visible Detection of Organelle, Tumor and Virus etc.

Speaker
Shiguo Sun / College of Chemistry & Pharmacy, Northwest A&F University, China

Abstract

By constructing a three-dimensional scaffold for large-scale in vitro expansion of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells, it provides an experimental basis for the application of stem cells in tissue engineering and disease treatment. Methods: The Wharton's jelly extracted from the umbilical cord was cultured in an incubator for about 14 days, and the cells climbed out of the Wharton's jelly and formed a long fusiform shape. The sodium alginate chitosan composite scaffold prepared by vacuum freeze-drying method was optimized by PLL grafting. It was observed by scanning electron microscopy that the scaffold has uniform pore size and interconnected pore structure and high porosity. Counting found that cells proliferated faster and had the potential to expand cells in vitro. However, cells grown on this scaffold are more difficult to elute. The PLGA three-dimensional scaffold was prepared by electrospinning technique and optimized by PLL grafting. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the scaffold had interconnected pore structure and high porosity. The single fiber diameter of the scaffold was 3 μm, and the cells were inoculated three days later. It was observed that the cells on the PLGA scaffold showed a spherical growth morphology with an average size of 5 μm. At the same time, it was found by cell counting and cck-8 analysis that the cells grew faster on the PLGA scaffold. And through pluripotency analysis, flow cytometry analysis, and aging assays, it was demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells expanded on optimized PLGA three-dimensional scaffolds without losing stem cell characteristics. Results: The optimized sodium alginate-chitosan porous composite scaffold provides an excellent environment for cell proliferation, but the cells grown on the scaffold are difficult to recover. The optimized PLGA three-dimensional scaffold can provide good proliferation conditions for mesenchymal stem cells. After ten days of cell culture, the cells grown on the optimized PLGA scaffold are three times that of the common culture dish. The optimized PLGA scaffold has the feasibility of amplifying mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and can be used as a potential material for tissue engineering applications.

Biography

ZHIXU HE has completed his PhD from Sichuan University, China and postdoctoral studies from Sun-Yat-sen University,China. He is the director of Tissue Engineering and Stem Cell Research Center, Zunyi Medical University. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Speaker
ZHIXU HE / Zunyi Medical University, China

Abstract

Polyamidoamine(PAMAM) dendrimers are well-defined, regularly branched macromolecules with particular advantages, including nanoscale 3D spherical architecture, multivalent bonding surface with tailoring possibility of biological or chemical property, as well as intramolecular cavity serving as a host-molecule encapsulation. In this study,PAMAM dendrimers with different terminal groups are utilized to guide surface group effects, generating proteins response. Subsequently, protein absorption behavior and conformation would be researched. Meanwhile, the thermodynamic interaction between proteins and PAMAM will be discussed. Firstly, the polyamide (PAMAM) molecules with different terminal groups were introduced onto the surface of the materials by electrostatic interaction and covalent bonding. Following this studying protein absorption behavior and conformation change (by absorption protein quantification and ATR) can reveal the surface groups effects induced by PAMAM with unlike outer groups. PAMAM on the surface affected proteins absorption and conformation changes, accompanied by the increase of the -NH2 or -COOH groups. In addition, proteins absorbed onto PAMAM interface tended to increase degree of disorder with the mutative content of α helix, β sheet and β turns. Furthermore, by fluorescence spectra, the thermodynamic parameters for these interactions between proteins and PAMAM can be calculated. Fluorescence intensity gradually decreased with the increase of PAMAM concentrate. Moreover, calculating the thermodynamic parameters uncovered that the reaction of proteins with PAMAM was a spontaneous process (ΔG<0), and the main driving forces were recognized by ΔH and ΔS.

Biography

She is a PhD from Southwest Jiaotong University, majoring in material science and engineering. Her research mainly involves the surface modification of cardiovascular materials, multifunctional microenvironment construction and in-situ endothelialization.

Speaker
Li Li / Southwest Jiaotong University, China

Abstract

Recently, sorafenib being studied in combination therapy in colorectal cancer (CRC) attracted attention of researchers. On the basis of our previous study, pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) loaded nanoparticles showed good effect on CRC in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we designed a combination therapy for sorafenib (Sora), a multi-kinase inhibitor and PEDF, a powerful antiangiogenic gene, in a nano-formulation aimed to increase anti-tumor effect on CRC for the first time. Sora and PEDF gene were simultaneously encapsulated in PEG-PLGA nanoparticles by a modified double-emulsion solvent evaporation method. The obtained co-encapsulated nanoparticles (Sora@PEDF-NPs) showed high entrapment efficiency of both Sora and PEDF gene and exhibited a uniform spherical morphology. The release profiles of Sora and PEDF gene were in a sustained manner. The most effective tumor growth inhibition in the C26 cells and C26-bearing mice was observed in the Sora@PEDF-NPs in comparison with none-drug nanoparticles, free Sora, mono-drug nanoparticles (Sora-NPs and PEDF-NPs) and the mixture of Sora-NPs and equivalent PEDF-NPs (Mix-NPs). More importantly, Sora@PEDF-NPs showed lower toxicity than free Sora in mice according to the acute toxicity test. The serologic biochemical analysis and mice body weight during therapeutic period revealed that Sora@PEDF-NPs had no obvious toxicity. All the data demonstrated that the simultaneously loaded nanoparticels with multi-kinase inhibitor and antiangiogenic gene might be one of the most potential formulations in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma in clinic and worthy of further investigation.

Biography

Hongtao Xiao has completed completed his doctorate in biomedical engineering with the theoretical and practical combination of pharmacy and pharmacology at the Tongji Medical University, China, West China School of Pharmacy Sichuan University,University of Electronic Science and Technology of China for bachelor, master, PHD, respectively. After his pharmacogenetics study in University of California San Francisco, he joined the Sichuan Cancer Hospital&Institute, Sichuan Cancer Center, School of Medicine, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China as the dean and professor. Now he is focused on cancer pharmacology and gene therapy of cancer, he published about 80 papers and 7 patens. He also got a lot of grant from government.

Speaker
Hongtao Xiao / Sichuan Cancer Hospital&Institute, China

Abstract

Wounds are the major cause of physical disabilities. Skin injuries represent an important health problem that needs to be managed properly inorder to avoid serious consequences in terms of morbidity, disability and life quality. There are vast varieties of synthetic wound dressing material available in market, but current focus in wound therapy is on upholding the moisture balance in the wound bed and protection against pathogenic invasion.Nowadays, traditional wound dressing plays an important role in wound care management. In which, the wound care dressing material is carried by medicinal plant extract. As the medicinal plant Nelumbo nucifera has auspicious/beneficial effect such as anti-bacterial, anti-microbial, anti-fungal, anti-cancer and anti-coagulant properties. Hence an attempt has been made to screen the effect on Nelumbo nucifera stamens on anti-bacterial activity for the wound care. Due to these opportune activities, wound dressing material have been developed using Nelumbo nucifera plant stamen crude extract. In the plant Nelumbo Nucifera, the compound Quercetin play a significant role in hemostasis (coagulant-stopping the blood) and Anti-inflammatory activity. Here the stamen methanol extract were extracted and concentrated. Then the concentrated sample were tested for Characterization analysis which includes High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography(HPTLC), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) Spectroscopy and Ultra VioletVisible(UV-Vis) Spectroscopy. The dip and dry method is used for coating the extract on cotton gauze under room temperature. Further, the Nelumbo nucifera stamen isolation sample showed resistance to the Anti-bacterial activity.

Biography

Ms.R.Sreepadmini currently working as Assistant Professor (Sr.G) with an experience of 6 years, in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Sri Ramakrishna Engineering College, India. She has a Bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Instrumentation, and a master’s degree in Applied Electronics. She has obtained First Class with Distinction in her master’s degree from P.S.G college of Technology, Coimbatore.Her research and teaching interests include Biomaterials, Biomechanics, Modeling of Physiological & Biomedical Systems, 3D & Bioprinting. She had attended more than 16 Short term courses & 15 workshops related to her area of interest at reputed Institutions like IIT’s and NIT’s covering almost top seven IIT’s.She has also presented paper in the International Conference held at University of Jaffna, Srilanka. She has one reputed Journal Publication in the Materials Today Proceedings, ELSEVIER. She has guided 8 Under Graduate Projects so far & had acted as a Faculty Mentor for the Innovative Competitions and has a professional memebership in ISTE.

Speaker
Sreepadmini Ragunathan / Sri Ramakrishna Engineering College , India

Plenary Talks

Abstract

Chirality is one of life’s most distinctive biochemical signatures and has great influence on many biological events, e.g. maintaining normal functions for living cells. It reveals that cells can sense surface chiral molecules to show differential behaviors on enantiomorphous surfaces. So far, the researches are mainly confined to the role of molecular chirality on two dimensional (2D) surface and a lot of questions remaining to be answered. Among them, how nanofibrous chirality influences cell behaviors in three dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) is especially important, since it is only the 3D ECM nanofibrous structure can really mimick the necessary biophysical environment for tissue engineering and helical nanofibrous structure is closely related with the relevant biological events.To explore this, supramolecular gelators are of particular interest candidate because their assembly arises from non–covalent interactions. With the rational design of chemical composition and molecular structures, surpramolecular gelators can be efficiently self-assemble into two or three dimensional chiral microstructures, showing a big potential as biomimetic scaffold for multi-dimensional cell culture. With variation of physical or chemical properties, the chiral structures with the varied surface composition, mechanical strength, and surface wettability can be constructed and chirality regulated cell adhesion can be obtained in 3D. It is found that left-handed hydrogels can enhance cells adhesion and proliferation, but not for right-handed hydrogels. A smart control of cell adhesion is also realized by applying external fields, such as light, pH and so on. The study paves a way to explore the influence of chiraity of nanostructures on cell behaviors cell culture in 3D chiral environments and this chiral materials have potential application in the field of tissue engineering. For example, recently, stem cells are successfully cultured in 3D and it is found that stem cells can successfully differentiate into Osteoblast, however, stem cells are inhibited to differentiate.

Biography

He is currently the deputy director of the National Biomedical Materials Engineering Technology Research Center. His main academic part-time jobs include the director of the China Biomaterials Society, the deputy director of the Bone Repair Materials and Devices Branch, and the deputy director of the 3D Printing Branch of Biomedical Materials . 1989 to 1997 , has participated in the national eight-five, nine-five research projects, engaged in high-performance high-temperature polymer materials and composite materials research work, and undertake the work of military supporting materials projects, and achieved a number of results He has won the " National Eighth Five-Year Key Achievements " Award and the " Ministry of Science and Technology Progress Third Prize " .   Since 2001 , he has participated in research on polylactic acid synthesis and chemical recycling in major projects of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. He has developed research on synthesis, modification and decomposition properties and chemical recycling of biodegradable polymer polylactic acid. An environmentally friendly catalytic system. In 2004 , he entered the Biomaterials Center of the National Materials Research Institute of Japan, using biodegradable and absorbable polymer materials for drug release systems and tissue engineering research. In 2006 , he returned to China to join the Biomaterials Engineering Research Center of Sichuan University and the National Biomedical Materials Engineering Technology Research Center. As project leader, has hosted the National High Technology Research and Development Program ( 863 Program) key project 1 , the National Science and Technology Support Program 2 , the National Natural Science Foundation project project 1 , the National Natural Science Foundation of China 3 Xiang And provincial and ministerial level scientific research projects. Published more than 80 SCI papers, with more than 1,000 citations . Apply for more than 30 invention patents in China and authorize more than 10 patents . Apply for 3 Japanese patents , two of which filed PCT international patent applications and applied for patent licenses in several countries. Development of collagen-based cartilage repair products (in the clinical stage) and bioactive toothpaste (pre-production phase) and other products.

Speaker
Fan Yujiang / Sichuan University, China

Abstract

There is considerable interest in the use of magnesium in biodegradable medical implants, particularly for applications where some mechanical strength is needed, because it initially provides mechanical support and then dissolves when the body has healed. To control the high degradation rate of Mg in biological environments different elements have been added as alloying elements, being Zn, Ca, Al and rare earths the most effective ones. However, it is convenient to avoid those that are not naturally present in the human body because they can cause undesired secondary effects. But, unfortunately they are the most effective ones for corrosion protection, so other strategies, such as surface modifications, should be used. The surface of the alloys can be modified by depositing polymeric or ceramic coatings or they can be modified by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) or by laser treatments. Each process provides a different set of advantages. Polymeric and ceramic coatings (e.g. PLLA of sol-gel silica) reduce control rate, improve cellular growth, enhance fracture toughness and in some cases promote cellular growth. PEO limits corrosion rate and promotes cellular growth but reduce fracture toughness. Laser treatments modify the microstructure of the alloys changing properties, and increasing corrosion resistance, cellular growth and fracture toughness. Therefore, the use of surface treatments and coating processes modify the properties of the alloys and to improve its behaviour as biodegradable medical implant, allowing using only elements that are present in the human body.

Biography

Joaquin Rams is Full Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the Rey Juan Carlos University, where he is now head of department. He has published more than 90 research articles in JCR journals and directed more than 20 research projects. He has been twice visiting scholar at the Stanford University and has also made stays at the Sussex University. He is assessor of the Australian Research Council and Coordinator for Materials Science and Technology of the national evaluation agency. Currently he is involved in laser surface modification and in the development of coatings by thermal spray, HVOF, laser cladding and sol-gel coatings. He has focused the use of coatings in light alloys (Al, Mg and Ti) and also in polymer matrix composites. He is also involved in the structural health monitoring of composites.

Speaker
Joaquin Rams / Rey Juan Carlos University, Spain

Abstract

The development of biologically inspired materials typically involves extensive trial-and-error studies. Rational understanding and design using modeling and simulation become increasingly feasible due to more accurate models and affordable computing resources. We will share atomic-level insights insights into biomaterials properties at the 1 to 1000 nm scale using the Interface force field (IFF), including recognition and assembly of metal, oxide, and biomineral nanostructures mediated by biomolecules and polymers. Examples include nucleation and growth of bone, low dimensional materials, catalysts, hydrogels, and therapeutics. We will then discuss new opportunities using reactive simulations (IFF-R) and data science tools to learn and interpret the information contained in large computational and experimental data sets to accelerate property predictions. We outline the process of generating a feature representation, the translation into reinforcement learning with nodes and edges, and Bayesian-based uncertainty quantification of predicted properties. Requirements for data sets and first applications will be described.

Biography

Hendrik Heinz received his Ph.D. degree from ETH Zurich, carried out postdoctoral work at the Air Force Research Laboratory, is an Associate Professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry. His research focuses on the simulation of biomaterials and nanomaterials from the nanoscale to the microscale. He leads the development of the Interface force field and surface models for the simulation of compounds across the periodic table in high accuracy, including minerals, aloys, 2D materials, proteins, polymers. He received Special Creativity and Careers Awards from NSF, the Sandmeyer Award from the Swiss Chemical Society, and the Max Hey Medal from the Mineralogical Society.

Speaker
Hendrik Heinz / University of Colorado, USA

Abstract

Biography

Masaru Tanaka received his PhD degree from Hokkaido University in 2003. In the period of 1996-2000 he worked for TERUMO Co. and designed novel biocompatible polymers and commercialized as an artificial lung. In 2000 he moved to Hokkaido University and in 2007 he moved to Tohoku University. Stents covered with the self-organized porous 3D films are commercially available in the world clinical market. In 2009 he was awarded a full professorship at Yamagata University. From 2015, he is at Kyushu University as a Professor. He has received the SPSJ Asahi Kasei Award for his intermediate water concept based on the role of interfacial water at materials’ interphases. Intermediate water content is a good predictor of biological responses to materials and is using for high-through put materials discovery.

Speaker
Masaru TANAKA / Kyushu University, Japan

Abstract

Chirality is one of life’s most distinctive biochemical signatures and has great influence on many biological events, e.g. maintaining normal functions for living cells. It reveals that cells can sense surface chiral molecules to show differential behaviors on enantiomorphous surfaces. So far, the researches are mainly confined to the role of molecular chirality on two dimensional (2D) surface and a lot of questions remaining to be answered. Among them, how nanofibrous chirality influences cell behaviors in three dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) is especially important, since it is only the 3D ECM nanofibrous structure can really mimick the necessary biophysical environment for tissue engineering and helical nanofibrous structure is closely related with the relevant biological events. To explore this, supramolecular gelators are of particular interest candidate because their assembly arises from non–covalent interactions. With the rational design of chemical composition and molecular structures, surpramolecular gelators can be efficiently self-assemble into two or three dimensional chiral microstructures, showing a big potential as biomimetic scaffold for multi-dimensional cell culture. With variation of physical or chemical properties, the chiral structures with the varied surface composition, mechanical strength, and surface wettability can be constructed and chirality regulated cell adhesion can be obtained in 3D. It is found that left-handed hydrogels can enhance cells adhesion and proliferation, but not for right-handed hydrogels. A smart control of cell adhesion is also realized by applying external fields, such as light, pH and so on. The study paves a way to explore the influence of chiraity of nanostructures on cell behaviors cell culture in 3D chiral environments and this chiral materials have potential application in the field of tissue engineering. For example, recently, stem cells are successfully cultured in 3D and it is found that stem cells can successfully differentiate into Osteoblast, however, stem cells are inhibited to differentiate.

Biography

Prof. Dr. Chuanliang Feng received Doctor Degree from University of Twente (the Netherlands) in 2005. After this, he was awarded Max-Planck Society Scholarship to work at Max-Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz. From 1998 to July 2009, he was appointed as a research scientist in Biomade Technology Foundation (Groningen, the Netherlands). In Aug. 2009, he moved to Shanghai Jiaotong University as a full professor in School of Material Sciences and Technology. He was supported by Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, Program for Shanghai Pujiang Excellent Talents, and Program for Professor of Special Appointment (Eastern Scholar) at Shanghai Institutions of Higher Learning. His research mainly focuses on Chiral biomaterials, polymeric materials, supramolecular hydrogels. Important topics are synthesis and characterization of chiral supramolecular hydrogels and biomimetic materials as well as applications of biomaterials in Regenerative Medicine. He has published more than 110 papers, including J. Am. Chem. Soc., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., Adv. Mater. and so on. He has more than 20 patents. He is guest editor of European Polymer Journal, and editorial member of Advance Hybrid and Composite Materials. Recently, he has been awarded Richard Robert Ernst during PolyChar 2019 international conference due to his innovation contribution on supramolecular chemistry.

Speaker
Chuanliang Feng / Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

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