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Plenary Talks

Abstract

Chemical ligation of nucleic acid strands can be used to produce DNA and RNA constructs containing artificial backbones. I will discuss recent developments from our laboratory in this area and present results from next-generation sequencing analysis. This work shows that some modified DNA templates can be read through accurately by DNA polymerases. These results provide insight into the design of biocompatible nucleic acid backbone mimics which have potential for use in biotechnology, nanotechnology and synthetic biology applications.

Biography

Tom Brown was Lecturer, Reader then Professor at Edinburgh University from 1985 to 1995. He then moved to Southampton University until 2013. He is currently Professor of Nucleic Acid Chemistry at Oxford University. His research focuses on DNA sequence recognition and applications of oligonucleotides. He is the co-founder of three Biotech companies (Oswel, ATDBio and Primer Design) and has published 380 research papers and patents. He has received several awards including the Royal Society of Chemistry awards for Nucleic Acid Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Research. He was recently Chemistry World entrepreneur of the year and BBSRC Innovator of the Year.

Speaker
Tom Brown / University of Oxford,UK H index-66

Abstract

Fungi are diverse and morphologically variable organisms distributed worldwide. They are found in almost all habitats with current working estimates of 1,5 to 3,0 million. From these, about 150,000 species are mushrooms of which 14,000-16,000are scientifically known. About 7000 mushroom species are considered edible and about half of them are highly regarded. The poisonous mushrooms comprise around 500 species.There may be as many as 700 medicinal species which are regarded safe and possess around 130 different therapeutic effects. Mushrooms are considered excellent sources of protein, vitamins, dietary fiber, unsaturated fatty acids, minerals,etc. Since ancient times,mushroomshave been widely appreciated all over the world as healthy foods andmedicines. Those which are often regarded as gourmet foods (e.g.truffles) have excellent culinary properties. Currently, about 200 species of mushrooms are biotechnologically produced. There are rich sources of ethno-mycological and ethno-medicinal information on wild mushrooms in different countries of the world.Medicinal species (Ganodermaand Pleurotus species, Hericiumerinaceus, Trametes versicolor, Lentinula edodes, Ophiocordycepssinensis,etc.)produce bioactive polysaccharides, proteins, phenolics, tepenoids, polyketides, cyclic peptides, lectins, ribosome-inactivating proteins with antimicrobial, antiviral, anti-oxidant, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumorous, hypotensive, hepatoprotective, antidiabetic/hypoglycemic/hypocholesterolemic, andmitogenic/regenerative effects.Wild and cultivable edible/medicinal mushroom resources can be sources to obtainfunctional food (nutraceuticals, nutriceuticals), mycopharmaceuticals, and cosmetic products (cosmeceuticals, nutricosmetics).Mushrooms are widely used in bioremediation processes and agriculture industry. They possess a great potential for generating environmental and socio-economic impacts in human welfare.

Biography

Prof. Badalyan has completed her PhD at the age of 30 years from the Yerevan State University and postdoctoral studies from Lomonosov Moscow State University. She holds her DSc (1998) degree in Botany/Mycology in Armenia. Prof. Badalyan has more than 35 years of research experience in the areas of Fungal Biology and Biotechnology. Her research is directed to the studies of edible and medicinal mushroomsas a natural source of pharmaceutically valuable compounds to develop biotech-products. She has published more than 65 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of several international journals

Speaker
Susanna M. Badalyan / Yerevan State University, ARMENIA

Abstract

Biography

Alexander Seifalian, Professor of Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine worked at the Royal Free Hospital and University College London for over 26 years, during this time he spent a period of time at Harvard Medical School looking at caused of cardiovascular diseases and a year at Johns Hopkins Medical School looking at treatment of liver. He published more than 647 peer-reviewed research papers, and registered 14 UK and International patents. He is currently CEO of NanoRegMed Ltd, working on the commercialisation of his research. During his career Prof Seifalian has led and managed many large projects with successful outcomes in terms of commercialisation and translation to patients. In 2007 he was awarded the top prize in the field for the development of nanomaterials and technologies for cardiovascular implants by Medical Future Innovation, and in 2009 he received a Business Innovation Award from UK Trade & Investment (UKTI). He was the European Life Science Awards’ Winner of Most Innovative New Product 2012 for the “synthetic trachea”. Prof Seifalian won the Nanosmat Prize in 2013 and in 2016 he received the Distinguish Research Award in recognition of his outstanding work in regenerative medicine from Heals Healthy Life Extension Society. His achievements include development of the world first synthetic trachea, lacrimal drainage conduit, and vascular bypass graft using nanocomposite materials, bioactive molecules and stem cell technology. He has over 15,000 media report from his achievement,include BBC, ITV, WSJ, CNN, and many more.Currently he is working on development and commercialisation of human organs using graphene based nanocomposite materials and stem cells technology.

Speaker
Alexander Seifalian / The London BioScience Innovation Centre, United Kingdom

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Chemical ligation of nucleic acid strands can be used to produce DNA and RNA constructs containing artificial backbones. I will discuss recent developments from our laboratory in this area and present results from next-generation sequencing analysis. This work shows that some modified DNA templates can be read through accurately by DNA polymerases. These results provide insight into the design of biocompatible nucleic acid backbone mimics which have potential for use in biotechnology, nanotechnology and synthetic biology applications.

Biography

Tom Brown was Lecturer, Reader then Professor at Edinburgh University from 1985 to 1995. He then moved to Southampton University until 2013. He is currently Professor of Nucleic Acid Chemistry at Oxford University. His research focuses on DNA sequence recognition and applications of oligonucleotides. He is the co-founder of three Biotech companies (Oswel, ATDBio and Primer Design) and has published 380 research papers and patents. He has received several awards including the Royal Society of Chemistry awards for Nucleic Acid Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Research. He was recently Chemistry World entrepreneur of the year and BBSRC Innovator of the Year.

Speaker
Tom Brown / University of Oxford, UK

Abstract

For many years, the general understandingaboutmolecular communication had been restricted to mammalian systems where multicellular structures respond to stimuli in a coordinated manner.But with the revelation that bacteria, although unicellular, are communicative organisms, a new outlook opened up with wider scope in research into biological communication. Soon, the term quorum sensing was adopted to describe the population-density dependent process involving specific, small diffusible molecules. Quorum sensing process confersto the whole microbial population variety of attributes including pathogenicity, virulence, the ability to form biofilms,aggregation and motility. The quorum sensing system was first described in bacteria; originally in the population ofAliivibrio fischeri,the luminous marine bacterium. Subsequently, quorum sensing mechanism was described in some yeasts, and later in filamentous fungi. As the research on microbial communication has continued, a range of quorum sensing molecules have been identified and classified under different categories in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as well as fungi.Quorum sensing process is also reported in some social insects. In in the Gram-negative bacteria, different molecules of homoserine lactone, autoinducer2, alkyl quinolones and some fatty acids are identified as quorum sensing molecules. Quorum sensing in Gram-positive bacteria includes γ-butyrolactone and molecules belonging to three families of post-translationally modifiedpeptides.While quorum sensing in single-species communication has been studied extensively, increasing examples of interspecies communication and interkingdomcross-talk are reported with quorum sensing molecules active between species. Studies of microbial communication promise a range of applications with impact on medical, agricultural, and industrial sectors.

Biography

Professor Tajalli Keshavarz has 28 years of industrial and academic experience in Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology. He has been the scientist in charge of several EU and Nationalprojectsin microbial physiology, fermentation, white biotechnology, and quorum sensing. Keshavarz has been the UK representative andmember of management committee to fourEuropean COST Actions. He is the author of over 130 refereed scientific articles and editor of six international journals in biotechnology and microbiology. He is a member of committees of international conferences and has served many years as Chair of the Biotechnology Group of the Society of Chemical Industry.

Speaker
Tajalli Keshavarz / University of Westminster, UK

Abstract

Brain tumours such as pituitary adenomas in most cases are treated via transsphenoidal surgery, in which the brain is accessed through the nose. Although technological innovations such endoscopy have improved outcomes, some pituitary adenomas remain difficult to cure, and approximately a third of patients will have an incomplete resection. The imaging techniques that improve intraoperative visualisation and identification of tumour tissue and related neurovascular structures will further improve the effectiveness and safety of surgery. Intraoperative ultrasound has been proposed due to its simplicity, low cost and real time structural information. In order to better evaluate ultrasound devices designed for pituitary surgery, and to allow for training of surgeons using such devices, we have developed a patient-specific pituitary phantom for ultrasound imaging. The phantom consisted of a skull and important soft tissues including the pituitary gland, carotid arteries, and optic chiasm. The skull was developed from segmented CT images using several freely available 3D-modelling software programs including Seg3D, MeshLab and MeshMixer. The model was 3D printed using polylactic acid (PLA). Soft tissues were developed from segmented MRI images and 3D printed using recently developed technology using tissue-mimicking Gel Wax material. Early validation of the phantom was performed by a neurosurgeon using a prototype ultrasound device specifically designed for pituitary surgery. A pituitary phantom was anatomically accurate with realitic ultrasound properties. Moreover, in future different sizes and types of pituitary adenoma to be printed, thus allowing for phantom optimisation and customizability.

Biography

Daniil Nikitichev has completted his PhD in Physics in 2012 from University of Dundee, UK. Last 6 years he has been working at University College London developing novel imaging and 3D printing technologies for various medical applications. In 2017 he received a Chartered Engineer Status. He is a member of the Institute of Physics. The main area of the research are 3D printing, Medical Imaging (Ultrasound, Photoacoustic, MRI), multi-modality phantom development.

Speaker
Daniil I. Nikitichev / University College London, London

Abstract

The mechanisms inducing blood coagulation in the host have to be effectively inhibited by blood-feeding parasites like leeches. Thus, leeches secrete salivary proteins like hirudin into the skin wound of host animals to inhibit thrombin, the most important coagulation inducing protease in the body fluids of vertebrate hosts. Several isoforms of hirudin have been identified in medicinal leech species, e.g. in Hirudo sp., Hirudinaria manillensis or Macrobdella decora. While hirudin is used for medical applications, we have discovered that leeches express several isoforms of a new class of proteins that structurally resemble hirudin, the so-called hirudin-like factors (Hlfs). Expression of such Hlfs could be experimentally verified in salivary gland cells isolated from Hirudo sp. and Hirudinaria sp.. However, nothing is known about the function of these proteins, but they might have high potential as pharmaceutical drugs. For this reason we started the functional characterization of these factors. His-tagged variants of those proteins were synthesized using classical bacterial expression via E. coli. After purification by immobilized metal affinity chromatography and removal of the remaining His-tag by factor-Xa digestion several in vitro assays were performed. Our results indicate that some, but not all of the HLFs have an anti-coagulatory activity. However, the HLFs have a somewhat lower effectiveness on thrombin inhibition compared to classical hirudins. Hence our research may give a clue for future development of potent anticoagulants with new properties for antithrombotic therapies.

Biography

Dr. George H Armstrong is a professor of organic chemistry at Tougaloo College where the emphasis is on teaching and mentoring students. The most rewarding part of his career has been mentoring students.He has mentored more than 100 undergraduate students in research. He has received two major faculty awards; in 2011 he received the distinguished professor award and in 2015, he received the Edgar E. and Inez W. Smith Excellence in Research/Creativity Award. He has fourteen U. S. Patents and is currently working on new drugs for treating breast cancer

Speaker
George H. Armstrong / Tougaloo College, US

Inivited Talks

Abstract

Biography

Speaker
Karlen Hovnanyan / President of Electron Microscopy of RA, Armenia

Abstract

Biography

Anne Chantal Gouget has completed her Ph.D. in 2000 from the University of Strasbourg, France under the supervision of Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Nobel Prize 2017. After a postdoctoral position at DSM, dutch chemical company in Geleen, she worked for a french biotech society on the development of fluorescent biochips. Since 2002, she is researcher at the CNRS where she mainly works on surface functionalization for biodetection. Since 2015, she is deputy director of the Condensed Matter Physics laboratory from the Ecole polytechnique, France. She has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Anne Chantal Gouget / CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, France

Abstract

Biography

Speaker
Peter Leggo / University of Cambridge, UK

Abstract

Biography

Shiwei Song obtained her Ph.D. in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering from National University of Singapore (NUS) in 2007. She has over 10 years of experience on protein chemistry & physics and protein immobilization, and 6 years of experience in directed evolution of enzymes while she was working in Codexis Singapore. She was awarded U.S. EPA Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 2012 for her outstanding work on directed evolution of LovD enzyme for commercial process to Simvastatin. From February 2013 to September 2014, she worked in Glaxo Wellcome Manufacturing as a Senior Chemist. She has received GSK Employee Recognition Award for Leading Analytical Tech Transfer for NCE project in 2014. She is currently a Senior Lecturer with the School of Life Sciences and Chemical Technology at Ngee Ann Polytechnic. Her major research interest is in biotechnology and its applications, especially enzymology, protein engineering and bio-inspired approach, materials and process development.

Speaker
Shiwei Song / Ngee Ann Polytechnic, Singapore

Abstract

Biography

Robert Pintarič is aAssistant on Faculty of Health science, Maribor Slovenia Research Assistant in University Medical Centre Maribor.Graduated engineer of radiology 1997-2000 Faculty of Health, University of Ljubljana Slovenia. Specialist of information science within health care and health nursing 2005-2006 Faculty of Health Science Maribor, University of Maribor Slovenia. Master of Science in radiology and tehnology 2013-2014 Faculty of Health, University of Ljubljana Slovenia.PhD student of Jožef Stefan International Postgraduate School University of Ljubljana and PhD student Faculty of Psihology department of Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience University of Maribor. Works at University Medical Center Maribor Department of Radiology, speciality magnetic resonance diagnostics 3.0 T, seventeen years of experiences of angiography, intervention radiology and cardiology.

Speaker
Robert Pintarič / UKC Maribor, Slovenia

Abstract

Biography

Dr. Deepa Jose has completed her Ph.D from College of Engineering Guindy, Anna University Chennai, India. She is the Head of Research and Development at KCG College of Technology - a group of Hindustan Institutions a premier institute for engineering education and research. She has published more than 45 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of various reputed journals. She is a Life Member of IEI and member of IEEE. She has taught students to learn more through doing projects and apply what they learn to design and solve real time problems t. Her research works include electronic devices for medical applications for eg: early detection of cancer, IOT, Artificial Intelligence and VLSI Design.

Speaker
Deepa Jose / KCG College of Technology, India

Abstract

Biography

Ana Marques has completed her PhD in Biotechnology and her postdoctoral studies from the Portuguese Catholic University. She has been involved in research activities since 2000, when she was a researcher at Technical University of Denmark working on the production of bioparticles for biofilm applications. Since 2002 she has been developing work at CBQF concerning the remediation of disturbed soils using plant-based technologies, with the application of biological tools. She has published 2 book chapters and 22 papers in international peer-reviewed journals, participated in numerous conferences and has been serving as a reviewer in several reputed scientific journals.

Speaker
Ana Marques / CBQF/ESB-UCP, Portugal

Abstract

Biography

Phil Lukas completed his M. Sc. in Biotechnology and Process Engineering 2015 at the University of Applied Science in Flensburg. 2016 he started his graduation at the University of Greifswald at the working group Animal Physiology and Biochemistry. Main focus of his research are recombinant forms of secretory proteins derived from the salivary gland cells of medicinal leeches and their functional testing. His studies are funded by the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung. Further he established a collaboration between Greifswald and the Fraunhofer-Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology for cell free synthesis of salivary proteins

Speaker
Phil Lukas / University of Greifswald,Germany

Abstract

Biography

Abdeen Mustafa Omer (BSc, MSc, PhD) is an Associate Researcher at Energy Research Institute (ERI). He obtained both his PhD degree in the Built Environment and Master of Philosophy degree in Renewable Energy Technologies from the University of Nottingham. He is qualified Mechanical Engineer with a proven track record within the water industry and renewable energy technologies. He has been graduated from University of El Menoufia, Egypt, BSc in Mechanical Engineering. His previous experience involved being a member of the research team at the National Council for Research/Energy Research Institute in Sudan and working director of research and development for National Water Equipment Manufacturing Co. Ltd., Sudan. He has been listed in the book WHO'S WHO in the World 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2010. He has published over 300 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 200 review articles, 7 books and 150 chapters in books

Speaker
Abdeen Mustafa Omer / Energy Research Institute (ERI), Nottingham, United Kingdom

Abstract

Biography

Dr. hab. inż. Anna Bujacz has completed herPhD,DScfrom Lodz University of Technology, Poland. She has been involved in rational drug development projects during her 3-year stay as visiting scientist at NCI, Frederick, USA.She has participated in numerous international and Polish NCN grants, a number of which she has led. Her research focuses on protein crystallography. She is interested in structural investigation of proteins used in biotechnology and medicine.She has determined the crystal structures of many enzymes including extremophilic ones, as well as a number of mammalian serum albumins in complexes with drugs. She has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals in which shedescribes protein - ligand interactions basing on three dimensional crystal structures

Speaker
Anna Bujacz / Lodz University of Technology, Poland

Abstract

Biography

Speaker
Alexei Yeliseev / National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, USA

Abstract

Biography

Prof. Fu-Ming Wang was born in Taipei, Taiwan. He received the B.S. and M.S. chemical engineering degree from National Taipei University of Technology and National Taiwan University of Science and Technology. He received his Ph. D. degree in electrochemical engineering and lithium battery technology from National Tsing Hua University at 2009 in Taiwan. From 2004~2010, he is working as a senior researcher at the energy storage division in Industrial Technology Research Institute in Taiwan and develops polymer electrolytes, functional additives, formation process design, reversible engineering and ionic transfer mechanism investigations. From 2010~2018, he services as Professor, Associate Professor, and Assistant Professor at National Taiwan University of Science and Technology and focuses on the researches of lithium ion battery and biosensor. He had already published more than 70 SCI papers and 27 patents in the world.

Speaker
Fu-Ming Wang / Ultra-sensitive electrochemical biosensor for theapplication in ovarian cancer diagnosis

Abstract

Biography

Dr. Yuelian Liu (Maria) is an Associate Professor at the department of Oral Implantology and Prosthetic Dentistry, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), VU University and University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands. She completed her study as a maxillofacial surgeon in 1991 in Shanghai 9th hospital, Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China. After 9-year clinical practice, from 1995 to 1998 she worked as a research fellow at the department of Maxillofacial surgery, Dental School of KU Leuven, Belgium and obtained her Master degree in medical science in 1997. She received her PhD degree in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Leiden, the Netherlands in 2003. After that, she worked as a research scientist at ITI research institute, Bern University in Switzerland and Tweete University in the Netherlands. From 2006, she has been working at ACTA as a research group leader and a supervisor for PhD students . She has got three patents and received 9 internationally recognized scientific awards, such as: Toshi Nakao fellowship award from IADR (2003) (www.iadr.org); Andre Schroeder Prize from ITI (2003); winner of the scientific competition of the ITI world symposium (www.iti.ch) (2005) and the best PhD thesis 2003-2005 from Netherlands Society for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering (NBTE) (www.biomaterialen.nl/). Recently, she was honoured by the European Prize of the Basic Research in Implant Dentistry in the 23rd annual scientific meeting of Europe Association of Osteointergration (EAO) in Rome, Italy (2014) (www.eao.org). She has obtained more than 20 international research grants and authored and co-authored more than 60 papers. She is an ITI fellow and IADR member. She is an honorary Professor of School/Hospital Stamatology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China. She lectures widely at national and international conferences. Her research is focused on bone regeneration and osteointergration. She developed and patented a slow and local drug release system by using biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings on biomaterial surface and an osteoinductive bone substitute for bone tissue engineering.

Speaker
Yuelian Liu / The University of VU, Netherland

Abstract

Biography

Mehmet Celenk received a Ph.D. degree from Stevens Institute of Technology in EECS in 1983, where he was the Robert Crook Stanley Graduate Fellow in 1985. He served on the Turkish Army in 1984-85 as a lieutenant and joined OU in 1985, where he is currently a Professor of the School of EECS. He has published 300 articles, received a $600,000 hypercube processor grant, participated in a $450,000 Tubitak Autonomous Vehicle Design and Development grant, and secured $120,000 in funds for visiting scholars’ R&D projects. He has directed 35 M.S./Ph.D. theses/dissertations in the School of EECS. He received the distinguished service award from the Signal School in Ankara in 1984 for his R&D work and launching the Communications Journal. He was the recipient of the 1988 Fritz & Dolores Russ Research Award of the Russ College of ENT of OU, and awarded the OU Avionics Academic Challenge Faculty Fellowship in 1988-92. He has been an active reviewer for numerous professional societies (e.g., IEEE, IEE, IET, SPIE, IS&T, IAPR), journals/transactions, publishers, and funding agencies (e.g., NSF, NYSTAR 2002-07). He has been an associate editor of the IEEE Trans. on SMCA (currently SMC: Systems) since 2005 and of the Electronic Letters of the IET since 2015, and the recipient of the Best Associate Award of the IEEE SMC Society in 2010. He has served on the editorial board of the J. Recent Patents on Signal Proc. since 2008, on the Editorial Board of J. of Biometrics and its Applications since 2014, and on TCM of numerous international conferences. He is a member of IEEE, Eta Kappa Nu, and former member of SPIE, IS&T, ACM, ASEE, OE. He was awarded Certificate of Appreciation by SPIE’s Electronic Imaging J. and Optical Engineering for his review services in 2012-13.

Speaker
Mehmet Celenk / Ohio University, USA

Sessions:

Abstract

Malaria is causing more than half of a million deaths and 214 million clinical cases annually. Despite tremendous efforts for the control of malaria, the global morbidity and mortality have not been significantly changed in the last 50 years. Artemisinin, extracted from the medicinal plant Artemisia sp. is an effective anti-malarial drug. In 2015, elucidation of the effectiveness of artemisinin as a potent anti-malarial drug was acknowledged with a Nobel Prize. Owing to the tight market and low yield of artemisinin, an economical way to increase its production is to increase its content in Artemisia sp. through different biotechnological approaches including genetic transformation.Artemisia annua was transformed with rol ABC genes through Agrobacterium tumefacienes and Agrobacterium rhizogenes methods. Expression of key genes Cytochrome P450, aldehyde dehydrogenase1, amorpha-4, 11 diene synthase in the biosynthetic pathway of artemisinin and gene for trichome development and sesquiterpenoid biosynthetic were measured usingQuantitative real time PCR. Trichome density was analysed using confocal microscope. Artemisinin content was significantly increased in transformed plants when compared to un-transformed plants. The artemisinin content within leaves of transformed lines was increased by a factor of nine, indicating that the plant is capable of synthesizing much higher amounts than has been achieved so far through traditional breeding. Expression of all artemisinin biosynthesis genes was significantly increased, although variation between the genes was observed. Levels of the TFAR1 expression were also increased in all transgenic lines. The detection of significantly raised levels of expression of the genes involved in artemisinin biosynthesis in transformed roots correlated with the production of significant amounts of artemisinin in these tissues. Transformation of Artemisia sp. with rol ABC genes can lead to the increased production of artemisinin, which will help to meet the increasing demand of artemisinin because of its diverse pharmacological and anti-malarial importance.

Biography

PhD (funded HEC, Pakistan) from Quaid-i-Azam University, Pakistan (awarded 2013) with two gold medals.Plant Molecular Biologist with 6 years national, international research experience in Plant Biochemistry and plant Molecular biology. Areas of specialization, Plant biotechnology, genetic transformation of plants with different transformation procedures, Lab-work experience in all molecular biology techniques, also interested in several bench top bioassays to determine the biological and phytochemical activities of secondary metabolites isolated from plants, analysis of metabolic pathways in plants and DNA sequencing of plants. Teaching experience at masters and MS levels in molecular biology and principles of gene manipulation. 6 months research experience at University of Warwick, UK. Currently teaching as a Lecturer in International Islamic University and supervising 3 research students.

Speaker
Bushra Hafeez Kiani / International Islamic University, Pakistan

Abstract

For over two decades now, plants have been explored for their potential to act as production platforms for biopharmaceuticals, such as vaccines and monoclonal antibodies. Without a doubt, the development of plant viruses as expression vectors for pharmaceutical production have played an integral role in the emergence of plants as inexpensive and facile systems for the generation of therapeutic proteins. More recently, plant viruses have been designed as non-toxic nanoparticles which can target a variety of cancers and thus empower the immune system to slow or even reverse tumor progression. The following presentation describes the employment of plant virus expression vectors for the treatment of some of the most challenging diseases known today. The presentation concludes with a projection of the multiple avenues by which virus nanoparticles could impact developing countries.

Biography

Kathleen Hefferon received her PhD from the Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto and completed her postdoctoral fellowship at Cornell University. Kathleen has published multiple research papers, chapters and reviews, and has written three books. Kathleen is the Fulbright Canada Research Chair of Global Food Security and has been a visiting professor at the University of Toronto over the past year. Her research interests include virus expression vectors, food security agricultural biotechnology and global health. Kathleen lives in New York with her husband and two children.

Speaker
Kathleen Hefferon / Cornell University, USA

Abstract

The isolated bacterium from natural sources forms spores under adverse conditions and was screened and confirmed as gram positive Bacillus subtilis by various tests such as gram staining, spore staining and by Bergy’s Manual of systematic Bacteriology. Bacillus subtilis produces extracellular alkaline protease in growth medium and it was determined that it shows best growth at optimum pH and temperature 8.5 and 60 0C respectively. The results depicted that MgSO4 increases while β-mercaptoethanol decreases protease activity significantly and remaining salts showed no effects on protease activity. The partially purified alkaline protease was incubated with animal skin and it was observed that goat hairs were removed almost under incubation period of 7 hours. It is concluded that pollution-causing chemicals which are being used in leather processing are the main target which can be replaced with potential action of microbes.

Biography

I am Mr. Abdul Razzaq, working as lecturer at institute of molecular biology and biotechnology, University of Lahore and a PhD scholar at University of central Punjab Lahore. I have been working as senior scientist at BF biosciences limited- A therapeutic manufacturing company and working as project coordinator of a project on biofertilizers conducted between two reputed organizations, National Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE) and Ittehad Chemicals Limited (ICL) – Pakistan.

Speaker
Mr. Abdul Razzaq / The University of Lahore,Pakistan

Abstract

We have demonstrated that recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) can be incorporated into the calcium-phosphate (CaP) coatings deposited biomimetically upon titanium implants. Our studies have shown that rhBMP-2 thus incorporated was released at a level that not only induced but also sustained osteogenic activity during the entire 5-week monitoring period in vivo. This coating can act as a drug delivery system. In this study, the kinetic of rhBMP-2 release from such CaP coatings was characterized, both in vitro and in vivo, with a view to using this drug-carrier system in a clinical setting. RhBMP-2 was radiolabelled with 131I prior to its co-precipitation with CaP upon titanium implants. Six experimental groups (n=6) were then either immersed in a simulated physiological solution to monitor the release of 131I-rhBMP-2 in vitro, or implanted subcutaneously in rats to monitor the release of 131I-rhBMP-2 at an ectopic ossification site in vivo. The release of 131I-rhBMP-2 was monitored once a week for 5 weeks. In the testing group of rhBMP-2 incorporated into the coating, rhBMP-2 released slowly, locally and steadily compared with the control groups. There was 50% of total rhBMP-2 released in vivo and 18% of the total was released in vitro after 5 weeks. The release rate after week 1 till week 5 was 5% per week in vivo and less than 1% in vitro. The coating was significantly degraded after 5 weeks in vivo with the rhBMP-2 incorporated group, but not the control ones. We assume that the coating went to a cells mediated degradation and rhBMP-2 release. These findings confirmed that CaP coating is indeed a suitable carrier for rhBMP-2.

Biography

Dr. Yuelian Liu (Maria) is an Associate Professor at the department of Oral Implantology and Prosthetic Dentistry, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), VU University and University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands. She completed her study as a maxillofacial surgeon in 1991 in Shanghai 9th hospital, Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China. After 9-year clinical practice, from 1995 to 1998 she worked as a research fellow at the department of Maxillofacial surgery, Dental School of KU Leuven, Belgium and obtained her Master degree in medical science in 1997. She received her PhD degree in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Leiden, the Netherlands in 2003. After that, she worked as a research scientist at ITI research institute, Bern University in Switzerland and Tweete University in the Netherlands. From 2006, she has been working at ACTA as a research group leader and a supervisor for PhD students . She has got three patents and received 9 internationally recognized scientific awards, such as: Toshi Nakao fellowship award from IADR (2003) (www.iadr.org); Andre Schroeder Prize from ITI (2003); winner of the scientific competition of the ITI world symposium (www.iti.ch) (2005) and the best PhD thesis 2003-2005 from Netherlands Society for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering (NBTE) (www.biomaterialen.nl/). Recently, she was honoured by the European Prize of the Basic Research in Implant Dentistry in the 23rd annual scientific meeting of Europe Association of Osteointergration (EAO) in Rome, Italy (2014) (www.eao.org). She has obtained more than 20 international research grants and authored and co-authored more than 60 papers. She is an ITI fellow and IADR member. She is an honorary Professor of School/Hospital Stamatology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China. She lectures widely at national and international conferences. Her research is focused on bone regeneration and osteointergration. She developed and patented a slow and local drug release system by using biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings on biomaterial surface and an osteoinductive bone substitute for bone tissue engineering.

Speaker
Yuelian Liu / University of VU, Netherlands

Abstract

Historically, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) has passed from being the most frequent, older, and forgotten arrhythmia last century, to become the more investigated arrhythmia in this new millennium. Atrial premature contractions (APC) occurring in a critical timing during the relative atrial refractory period, in the presence of a non-homogeneous dispersion of refractoriness and conduction, can trigger atrial responses that determine atrial vulnerability and susceptibility to develop PAF. These atrial responses to clinical spontaneous APC can be reproduced in the electrophysiological laboratory. Indeed, the recording of abnormally prolonged and fractionated atrial electrograms by the technique of atrial endocardial catheter mapping during sinus rhythm, as well as, the induction of electrophysiological responses by programmed atrial stimulation with single extra stimulus have shed very interesting data for a better comprehension of the atrial myocardial substratein the genesis of AF.The abnormal atrial electrogram results in an irregular atrial conduction characterized by a non-homogeneous local electrical activity, related to an anisotropic, non-uniform and delayed conduction through a pathological atrial myocardium, in which episodes of PAF may arise.

Biography

Professor Osmar Antonio Centurión, is a cardiologist with expertise in Coronary Heart Diseases and Cardiac Arrhythmias, Hemodynamics and Electrophysiology and Arrhythmia Ablation. He is Professor of Medicine at the School of Medical Sciences from the Asuncion National University (UNA) in Asunción, Paraguay. He received is PhD degree in Cardiology, at the Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan in 1994. He is the Founding Member of Sociedad Latinoamericana de Cardiología Intervencionista (SOLACI). Author of more than 200 medical articles published in peer-reviewed American, European and Japanese journals in cardiology. He is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, and member of more than 10 International Cardiovascular Societies. He is currently chief of the Department of Cardiology, Hospital de Clinicas, Asunción, Paraguay.In addition, he is the Director of the Department of Health SciencesInvestigation at the Sanatorio Metropolitano, Fernando de la Mora, Paraguay. He is currently Member of the Editorial Board of more than 50 international scientific journals. He is Past-Editor-In-Chief of the Revista de la Sociedad Paraguaya de Cardiología, and current Editor-in-Chief of Mathews Journal of Cardiology, Blood, Heartand Circulation Journal, and Global J Medical and Clinical Case Reports

Speaker
Osmar Antonio Centurión / Asuncion National University, Paraguay

Abstract

Changes in the morphology of a skin lesion is indicative of melanoma, a deadlytype of skin cancer. This talk describes a temporal analysis method to monitor thevascularity, pigmentation, size and other critical morphological attributes of the lesion.Digital images of a skin lesion acquired during follow-up imaging sessions serves as inputto the system. The images are preprocessed to normalize variations introduced over time.The vascularity is modelled as the skin images’ red channel information and its changes bythe Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of the probability density function approximation ofhistograms. The pigmentation is quantified as textural energy, changes in the energy andpigment coverage in the lesion. An optical flow field and divergence measure indicates themagnitude and direction of global changes in the lesion. Sub-surface change is predictedbased on the surface skin lesion image with a novel approach. Changes in keymorphological features such as lesions’ shape, color, texture, size, and border regularityare also computed. Future trends of the skin lesion are estimatedvia an auto-regressive predictor.Finally, the classification performance with features extracted using deep convolutionalneural networks and the hand-crafted lesion features are compared. An accuracy of 80.5%,specificity of 98.14%, sensitivity of 76.9% with a deep learning neural network and anaccuracy of 25.17%, sensitivity of 92.31%, specificity of 8.9% with the hand-craftedfeature approach is achieved. Experimental results show the potential of the proposedmethod to monitor a skin lesion in real-time during routine skin exams.

Biography

Mehmet Celenk received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from Istanbul Technical University, in 1974 and 1976, in Electrical and Communications Engineering, and the Ph.D. degree from Stevens Institute of Technology in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), in 1983, where he was the Robert Crook Stanley Graduate Fellow in 1985. He served on the Turkish Army in 1984-85 as a lieutenant and joined Ohio University (OU) in 1985, where he is currently aProfessor of the School of EECS. His research interests include image/video processing, computer vision, multimedia, data fusion, pattern recognition, and biomedical engineering. He has published 300 articles, received $600K hypercube processor grant,participated in $450K Tubitak Autonomous Vehicle Design and Development grant,and secured $100K fund for visiting scholars’ R&D projects. He chaired 35 MS/Ph.D. theses/dissertations in the School of EECS of OU. He received the distinguished service award from the Signal School in Ankara for his R&D work and launching the Communications Journal. He was the recipient of the 1988 Fritz & Dolores Russ Research Award of the Russ College of ENT of OU, and awarded the OU Avionics Academic Challenge Faculty Fellowship in 1988-92. He has been an active reviewer for numerous professional societies (e.g., IEEE, IEE, IET, SPIE, IS&T, IAPR), journals/transactions, publishers,and funding agencies (e.g., NSF,NYSTAR 2002-07). He has been an AEof the IEEET on SMCA (currently SMC: Systems) since 2005, and the recipient of the Best Associate Award of the IEEE SMC Society in 2010. He has served on the Editorial Board of the J. Recent Patents on Signal Proc.since 2008, and on TCM of numerous refereed conferences including ISPA 2013, ICDP 2009, ICSMC 2008, ICSIP 2008, VISAPP 2008-2014, ICIP 2006-2014, ICPR 2006, CGIP 2000, CVPR 1999-2014, ICPRAM 2015, ISM 2014-15, ITS-IEVC 2013-14, BEIAC 2013-14, ISCI 2013-14, ISCAIE 2012, CHUSER 2012, CISP 2012-14, BME 2012-14, ISBEIA 2012, IPR 2012, ISWTA 2012, and IOV 2014. He is a member of IEEE,Eta Kappa Nu, and former member of SPIE, IS&T, ACM, ASEE, OE. He was awarded Certificate of Appreciation bySPIE’s Electronic Imaging J. and Optical Engineering for his review services in 2012-13. His research area includes image/video processing, computer vision, pattern recognition, multi-sensory networking, data fusion, distributed computing, multimedia, medical imaging, and digital systems.

Speaker
M. Celenk / Ohio University, US

Abstract

Brain tumours such as pituitary adenomas in most cases are treated via transsphenoidal surgery, in which the brain is accessed through the nose. Although technological innovations such endoscopy have improved outcomes, some pituitary adenomas remain difficult to cure, and approximately a third of patients will have an incomplete resection. The imaging techniques that improve intraoperative visualisation and identification of tumour tissue and related neurovascular structures will further improve the effectiveness and safety of surgery. Intraoperative ultrasound has been proposed due to its simplicity, low cost and real time structural information. In order to better evaluate ultrasound devices designed for pituitary surgery, and to allow for training of surgeons using such devices, we have developed a patient-specific pituitary phantom for ultrasound imaging. The phantom consisted of a skull and important soft tissues including the pituitary gland, carotid arteries, and optic chiasm. The skull was developed from segmented CT images using several freely available 3D-modelling software programs including Seg3D, MeshLab and MeshMixer. The model was 3D printed using polylactic acid (PLA). Soft tissues were developed from segmented MRI images and 3D printed using recently developed technology using tissue-mimicking Gel Wax material. Early validation of the phantom was performed by a neurosurgeon using a prototype ultrasound device specifically designed for pituitary surgery. A pituitary phantom was anatomically accurate with realitic ultrasound properties. Moreover, in future different sizes and types of pituitary adenoma to be printed, thus allowing for phantom optimisation and customizability.

Biography

Daniil Nikitichev has completed his PhD in Physics in 2012 from University of Dundee, UK. Last 6 years he has been working at University College London developing novel imaging and 3D printing technologies for various medical applications. In 2017 he received a Chartered Engineer Status. He is a member of the Institute of Physics. The main area of the research are 3D printing, Medical Imaging (Ultrasound, Photoacoustic, MRI), multi-modality phantom development.

Speaker
Daniil Nikitichev / University College London, UK

Abstract

Recently, a tendency to search for psychrophilic homologues of mesophilic enzymes has been growing. It is connected with economic and ecological aspects of their usage. Cold-adapted enzymes are useful in various industrial applications due to advantages connected with the lowering of reaction temperature. Psychrophilic enzymes exhibit an ability to catalyze the reaction, with efficiency similar to mesophilic ones, in significantly lower temperatures – due to their environmental adaptation. Their ability to overcome the energetic barrier (growing with the temperature decrease) is attributed with the changes in the enzyme’s primary, secondary and tertiary structures. This is why, the crystallographic study is a natural choice in order to determine the features specifically responsible for their cold-adaptation. However, it seems that successful implementation of an enzyme from a cold-adapted organism can be more cost and time-consuming, than engineering it by changing the thermal optimum of a known enzyme with the desired effect. The analysis of different strategies of cold-adaptation enabled us to present guidelines for enzyme engineering in terms of temperature. Regardless of the demand for cold-adapted enzymes, the understanding of cold-adaptation phenomenon on the molecular level had been fragmentary at best. That is why we decided to perform a structural study of different hydrolases and transferases to explain the mechanism of cold-adaptation. Determination of structural elements responsible for cold-adaptation and catalytically important residues will enable engineering of cold-adapted enzymes with enhanced activity. The research was supported by grant 2016/21/B/ST5/00555 from the National Science Centre, Poland

Biography

Dr. hab. inż.Anna Bujacz has completed her PhD,DSc from Lodz University of Technology, Poland. She has been involved in rational drug development projects during her 3-year stay as visiting scientist at NCI, Frederick, USA.She has participated in numerous international and Polish NCN grants, a number of which she has led. Her research focuses on protein crystallography. She is interested in structural investigation of proteins used in biotechnology and medicine.She has determined the crystal structures of many enzymes including extremophilic ones, as well as a number of mammalian serum albumins in complexes with drugs. She has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals in which she describes protein - ligand interactions basing on three dimensional crystal structures.

Speaker
Anna Bujacz / Lodz University of Technology, Poland

Abstract

Big Data along with Internet of things (IOT) are much needed technology to handle the genome data which overcome the ratio of data rate in twitter and social networks. This IOT with data analytics impacts some notorious changes in all applications such as healthcare, smart city, and so on. In general, the health care sector archives enormous amounts of data particular in records or hard copy form. If those records are digitalized into computerized format, it is crucial to store and segregate the data. By applying the big data technology, the volume and velocity of the data issues can be solved. For crucial diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, al the disease stage varies from one person to another person due to food habits, heredity etc., to go for a personalized medicine, genetic mutation and generic data has to be stored and analyzed, in this process, high throughput methodologies are needed at different levels. This chapter proposes the new system which works in cloud environment. The proposed methodology efficiently communicates with several servers cloud servers and checks with array of healthcare records. This system efficiently stores and process the data that provides the information from possible diagnostics to alternative medications for crucial diseases like breast cancer .so the person or patient data will not be in isolated state. It will be analyzed and compared with thousands of records in the history. Thispersonalized record analysis helps the physician can opt for exact medication for the patients. So the single physician to chain of hospitals can access this system to get the maximum benefits.

Biography

Vijayakumar Varadarajan is currently a Professor and an Associate Dean for School of Computing Science and Engineering at VIT University, Chennai, India. He has more than 18 years of experience including industrial and institutional. He also served as a Team Lead in industries like Satyam, Mahindra Satyam and Tech Mahindra for several years. He has completed Diploma with First Class Honors. He has completed BE CSE and MBA HRD with First Class. He has also completed ME CSE with First Rank Award. He has completed his PhD from Anna University in 2012. He has published many articles in national and international level journals/conferences/books. He is a reviewer in IEEE Transactions, Inderscience and Springer Journals. He has initiated a number of international research collaborations with universities in Europe, Australia, Africa, Malaysia, Singapore and North America. He had also initiated joint research collaboration between VIT University and various industries. He is also the Guest Editor for few journals in Inderscience, Springer and IGI Global. He also organized several international conferences and special sessions in USA, Vietnam, Africa, Malaysia and India including IEEE, ACSAT, ISRC, ISBCC, ICBCC etc. His research interests include computational areas covering grid computing, cloud computing, computer networks, cyber security and big data. He received his university-level Best Faculty Award for 2015–2016. He is also a member of several national and international professional bodies including EAI, BIS, ISTE, IAENG, CSTA, IEA etc.

Speaker
V.Vijayakumar / VIT University,India

Abstract

For many years, the general understandingaboutmolecular communication had been restricted to mammalian systems where multicellular structures respond to stimuli in a coordinated manner.But with the revelation that bacteria, although unicellular, are communicative organisms, a new outlook opened up with wider scope in research into biological communication. Soon, the term quorum sensing was adopted to describe the population-density dependent process involving specific, small diffusible molecules. Quorum sensing process confersto the whole microbial population variety of attributes including pathogenicity, virulence, the ability to form biofilms,aggregation and motility. The quorum sensing system was first described in bacteria; originally in the population ofAliivibrio fischeri,the luminous marine bacterium. Subsequently, quorum sensing mechanism was described in some yeasts, and later in filamentous fungi. As the research on microbial communication has continued, a range of quorum sensing molecules have been identified and classified under different categories in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as well as fungi.Quorum sensing process is also reported in some social insects. In in the Gram-negative bacteria, different molecules of homoserine lactone, autoinducer2, alkyl quinolones and some fatty acids are identified as quorum sensing molecules. Quorum sensing in Gram-positive bacteria includes γ-butyrolactone and molecules belonging to three families of post-translationally modifiedpeptides.While quorum sensing in single-species communication has been studied extensively, increasing examples of interspecies communication and interkingdomcross-talk are reported with quorum sensing molecules active between species. Studies of microbial communication promise a range of applications with impact on medical, agricultural, and industrial sectors.

Biography

Professor Tajalli Keshavarz has 28 years of industrial and academic experience in Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology. He has been the scientist in charge of several EU and Nationalprojectsin microbial physiology, fermentation, white biotechnology, and quorum sensing. Keshavarz has been the UK representative andmember of management committee to four European COST Actions. He is the author of over 130 refereed scientific articles and editor of six international journals in biotechnology and microbiology. He is a member of committees of international conferences and has served many years as Chair of the Biotechnology Group of the Society of Chemical Industry.

Speaker
Tajalli Keshavarz / University of Westminster, UK

Abstract

Organic synthesized-Benzylic Carbon Stereocenter compounds are excellent building blocks (synthons) for many medicinal compounds. We have developed a microwave-assisted organic synthesis procedure which allows us to rapidly synthesize a large number of ortho-substituted anilines with Benzylic Carbon Stereocenters. These compounds were characterized with a 500 MHz NMR and analyzed for purity with HPLC.These chiral benzylic compounds that have not been previously studied in cancer research. One of the most important chiral synthons throughout the realm of organic architecture is represented by the Benzylic Carbon Stereocenter, found in over 5000 natural product isolates. We hypothesize that some of the benzylic chiral compounds will have an efficacy for killing breast cancer cells. Initial test results on the determination of IC50 for several drugs using MTT (3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide)assay on MCF7, NCI/ADR and HTB26 breast cancer cells showed excellent results. The AMES-384 ISO was used to test the mutagenicity of selected compounds. Initial results look promising.

Biography

Dr. George H Armstrong is a professor of organic chemistry at Tougaloo College where the emphasis is on teaching and mentoring students. The most rewarding part of his career has been mentoring students.He has mentored more than 100 undergraduate students in research. He has received two major faculty awards; in 2011 he received the distinguished professor award and in 2015, he received the Edgar E. and Inez W. Smith Excellence in Research/Creativity Award. He has fourteen U. S. Patents and is currently working on new drugs for treating breast cancer.

Speaker
George H. Armstrong / Tougaloo College,USA

Abstract

Among industrial biocatalysts lipases are one of the most commonly used enzymes. It is a valuable biocatalyst in food, pharmaceutical, detergent, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. We have used directed evolution technique to evolve some of the naturally occurring lipase (Lip R1, isolated from Metagenomic sources) for its thermostability or Cold adaptation with enhanced catalytic efficiency. LipR1 was successfully able to catalyze the reactions for enantiomeric separation of important pharmaceutical intermediates. A highly thermostable mutantlipase LipM1 (N355K) was generated by error prone PCR (on pJK01 plasmid) and characterized. Mutant enzyme demonstrated 144 fold enhanced thermostability over the wild type enzyme at 60 °C. Interestingly, the overall catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of mutant was also enhanced (~ 20 folds). In another attempt of directed evolution, we were able to generate a double mutant LipR5 (R214C, N355K) with 168 fold enhancement in thermostability. In order to understand the molecular basis of cold adaptation, we have used directed evolution to transform a thermophilic lipase LipR1 into its psychrophilic counterpart. A single round of random mutagenesis followed by screening for improved variants yielded a mutant with single-point mutation LipR1M1 (S130T), with optimum activity at 20 °C which was 30°C less than the wild type. Homology modeling was carried out to explain structure function correlation

Biography

Prof. Jagdeep Kaur is working as a senior faculty (present designation as Professor) in the department of Biotechnology, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India since 1992. Since last 25 years her group improved upon the properties of several industrially important enzymes and studied their structure function relationship and application. Additionally they are trying to characterize some hypothetical gene products having αβ hydrolase fold in mycobacterium. Few lipases/esterases in mycobacterium were identified to get expressed under stress conditions. Attempts are being made to pin point their role in the biology of the bacterium. Epigenetic regulation of cancer by natural products is another area of interest in my lab. She has more than 140 publications, two patents and a technology transfer. Her citations = 2595, h-index = 26 and i10-index = 61 for the moment.

Speaker
Jagdeep Kaur / Panjab University, India

Plenary Talks

Abstract

The theory of acoustic and electromagnetic (EM) wave scattering by one and many small impedance particles of arbitrary shapes is developed. The basic assumptions are: a  d  λ, where a is the characteristic size of particles, d is the smallest distance between the neighboring particles, λ is the wavelength. This theory allows one to give a recipe for creating materials with a desired refraction coefficient. One can create material with negative refraction: the group velocity in this material is directed opposite to the phase velocity. One can create a material with a desired wave focusing property. Equation is derived for the EM field in the medium in which many small impedance particles are embedded. Similar results are obtained in [6] for heat transfer in the media in which many small particles are distributed. The theory presented in this talk is developed in [1]-[6]

Biography

Speaker
Alexander G. Ramm / Kansas State University, USA

Abstract

For many years, the general understanding about molecular communication had been restricted to mammalian systems where multicellular structures respond to stimuli in a coordinated manner. But with the revelation that bacteria, although unicellular, are communicative organisms, a new outlook opened up with wider scope in research into biological communication. Soon, the term quorum sensing was adopted to describe the population-density dependent process involving specific, small diffusible molecules. Quorum sensing process confersto the whole microbial population variety of attributes including pathogenicity, virulence, the ability to form biofilms,aggregation and motility. The quorum sensing system was first described in bacteria; originally in the population ofAliivibrio fischeri,the luminous marine bacterium. Subsequently, quorum sensing mechanism was described in some yeasts, and later in filamentous fungi. As the research on microbial communication has continued, a range of quorum sensing molecules have been identified and classified under different categories in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as well as fungi.Quorum sensing process is also reported in some social insects. In in the Gram-negative bacteria, different molecules of homoserine lactone, autoinducer2, alkyl quinolones and some fatty acids are identified as quorum sensing molecules. Quorum sensing in Gram-positive bacteria includes γ-butyrolactone and molecules belonging to three families of post-translationally modified peptides. While quorum sensing in single-species communication has been studied extensively, increasing examples of interspecies communication and interking do cross-talk are reported with quorum sensing molecules active between species. Studies of microbial communication promise a range of applications with impact on medical, agricultural, and industrial sectors.

Biography

Professor Tajalli Keshavarz has 28 years of industrial and academic experience in Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology. He has been the scientist in charge of several EU and Nationalprojectsin microbial physiology, fermentation, white biotechnology, and quorum sensing. Keshavarz has been the UK representative andmember of management committee to fourEuropean COST Actions. He is the author of over 130 refereed scientific articles and editor of six international journals in biotechnology and microbiology. He is a member of committees of international conferences and has served many years as Chair of the Biotechnology Group of the Society of Chemical Industry.

Speaker
Taj Keshavarz / University of Westminster, London

Abstract

Various pharmaceutical nanocarriers, including liposomes and polymeric micelles, are frequently used for the delivery of a broad variety of both soluble and poorly soluble pharmaceuticals to enhance the in vivo efficiency of many drugs. Now, within the frame of this concept, it is important to develop multifunctional stimuli-responsive nanocarriers, i.e. nanocarriers that, depending on the particular requirements, can circulate long; target the site of the disease via both non-specific and/or specific mechanisms, such as enhanced permeability and retention effect (EPR) and ligand-mediated recognition; respond local stimuli characteristic of the pathological site by, for example, releasing an entrapped drug or deleting a protective coating under the slightly acidic conditions inside tumors facilitating thus the contact between drug-loaded nanocarriers and cancer cells; and even provide an enhanced intracellular delivery of an entrapped drug with its subsequent delivery to specific intracellular organelles, such as nuclei, lysosomes or mitochondria. Additionally, these carriers can be supplied with contrast moieties to follow their real-time biodistribution and target accumulation. Among new developments to be considered in the area of multifunctional pharmaceutical nanocarriers are: drug- or/and RNA-loaded delivery systems additionally decorated with cell-penetrating peptides for the enhanced intracellular delivery; “smart” multifunctional drug delivery systems, which can reveal/expose temporarily hidden functions under the action of certain local stimuli characteristic for the pathological zone (such as lowered pH, pedox-conditions, hypoxia, or locally increased expression of certain enzymes); new means for controlled delivery and release of siRNA; approaches for intracellular drug delivery and organelle targeting; application of nanocarriers co-loaded with siRNA and drugs to treat multidrug resistant tumors; and nanocarrier-based new targeted contrast agents for diagnostic imaging.

Biography

Vladimir Torchilin got his M.S, Ph.D., and D.Sc. degrees from the Moscow State University and serves currently a University Distinguished Professor and Director, Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Nanomedicine, Northeastern University, Boston. He has published more than 400 original papers, more than 150 reviews and book chapters, wrote and edited 12 books, and holds more than 40 patents. Google Scholar shows more than 60,000 citations of his papers with H-index of 108. He is Editor-in-Chief of Current Drug Discovery Technologies, Drug Delivery, and OpenNano, Co-Editor of Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and on the Editorial Boards of many other journals. He received more than $30 M from the governmental and industrial sources in research funding. He has multiple honors and awards and in 2011, Times Higher Education ranked him number 2 among top world scientists in pharmacology for the period of 2000-2010.

Speaker
Vladimir Torchilin / Northeastern University, USA H index-108

Abstract

Light sustains life on earth and is one of the most important signals providinginformation to biological systems. Diverse systems such as plants, seaweeds, and photosynthesizingbacteria absorb ambient light and convert it into their life energy. During the past decade, there has beenextraordinary progress in identifying and characterizing ultrasensitive natural photoreceptorproteins in a broad range of organisms to understand the signal transduction pathways and to get an insight into their multifunctional response. The prospect of using their efficientphotoresponse optimized over centuries of evolution, for photonic applications, isextremely fascinating. Moreover, with the powerful capabilities of nano and biotechnologies,their photo-response can also be tailored to meet desired specifications. The talk would give an overview of the unique photoresponse of various photoreceptors and their wide range of applications. Some of our recent experimental and theoretical results on low-power ultrafast all-optical switching and computing withphotochromic molecules that include, bacteriorhodopsin (BR)and cytochtome-cproteins and its comparison with Cu-phthalocyanines, graphene, graphene-oxide and its composites, will be presented. It will be shown that all-optical switching of a near-IR signal in a 2 x 2 optically controlled microresonator using BR-coated ultrahigh-Q silica microresonator coupled between two single-mode optical fibers can be used as a template, to design a wide range of all-optical ultrafast Boolean, reversible and reconfigurable computing circuits that include, various logic gates, half-full adders-subtractors, counters, MUX/DE-MUXs, decoder-encoder, comparator, flip-flops, RAM and arithmetic logic unit (ALU). Genetically integrating proteins in neurons allows unprecedented spatial and temporal control of neural switching with light. Some of our recent results on accurate theoretical modeling of low-power, high frequency and ultrafast neuro-photonic signaling with blue-green sensitive Chronos and the red-shifted vf-Chrimson,the newly discovered light drivable channelrhodopsins with the fastest kinetics and high photosensitivity, will also be presented. The talk would thus highlight, (i) the emergence of natural photoreceptors as a new class of photonic materials for information processing, solar energy conversion, sensing and controlling the brain with light, (ii) the prospects for ultrafast all-optical information processing, and (iii) the importance of integrating technologies, i.e., Nano-Bio-Photonics to meet present challenges.

Biography

Professor Sukhdev Roy received his PhD. from IIT Delhi in 1993, and thereafter joined the Dayalbagh Educational Institute, where he is at present a Professor in the Department of Physics and Computer Science. He has been a visiting scientist at many universities that include, Harvard, Waterloo, Würzburg, Regensburg, Osaka, City University, London and Queen Mary University of London, TIFR-Mumbai and I.I.Sc.-Bangalore. He is also an Associate of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy. He has won a number of awards and fellowships that include, the, AICTE Career Award for Young Teachers in 2001, JSPS Invitation Fellowship, Japan in 2004, H.C. Shah Research Endowment Prize by Sardar Patel University in 2006, 1st IETE B.B. Sen Memorial Award in 2007, IETE-Conference on Emerging Opto-electronic Technologies Award in 2012, IETE-Smt. Manorama Rathore Memorial Award in 2016, the Systems Society of India’s National Systems Gold Medal in 2016 and six best paper awards in international and national conferences. He has published 175 research papers in reputed journals and conference proceedings and 11 book chapters. He was the Guest Editor of the March 2011 Special Issue of IET Circuits, Devices and Systems Journal (U.K.) on Optical Computing. He is an Associate Editor of IEEE Access and is a member of the Editorial Board of Optics and Photonics Journal. He is also a Senior Member of IEEE (USA) and a Fellow of the Indian National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, India, Institution of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineers (India), and the Optical Society of India. His research has focused on Nano-Bio-Photonics, especially on bioengineering of photosensitive proteins for all-optical information processing, photovoltaics, sensing and computational optogenetics that involves optimization of low-power, high frequency and high-fidelity neuronal firing with ultrafast channelrhodopsins.

Speaker
Sukhdev Roy / Dayalbagh Educational Institute, India

Keynote Talks

Abstract

The mechanisms inducing blood coagulation in the host have to be effectively inhibited by blood-feeding parasites like leeches. Thus, leeches secrete salivary proteins like hirudin into the skin wound of host animals to inhibit thrombin, the most important coagulation inducing protease in the body fluids of vertebrate hosts. Several isoforms of hirudin have been identified in medicinal leech species, e.g. in Hirudo sp., Hirudinaria manillensis or Macrobdella decora. While hirudin is used for medical applications, we have discovered that leeches express several isoforms of a new class of proteins that structurally resemble hirudin, the so-called hirudin-like factors (Hlfs). Expression of such Hlfs could be experimentally verified in salivary gland cells isolated from Hirudo sp. and Hirudinaria sp.. However, nothing is known about the function of these proteins, but they might have high potential as pharmaceutical drugs. For this reason we started the functional characterization of these factors. His-tagged variants of those proteins were synthesized using classical bacterial expression via E. coli. After purification by immobilized metal affinity chromatography and removal of the remaining His-tag by factor-Xa digestion several in vitro assays were performed. Our results indicate that some, but not all of the HLFs have an anti-coagulatory activity. However, the HLFs have a somewhat lower effectiveness on thrombin inhibition compared to classical hirudins. Hence our research may give a clue for future development of potent anticoagulants with new properties for anti thrombotic therapies.

Biography

Phil Lukas completed his M. Sc. in Biotechnology and Process Engineering 2015 at the University of Applied Science in Flensburg. 2016 he started his graduation at the University of Greifswald at the working group Animal Physiology and Biochemistry. Main focus of his research are recombinant forms of secretory proteins derived from the salivary gland cells of medicinal leeches and their functional testing. His studies are funded by the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung. Further he established a collaboration between Greifswald and the Fraunhofer-Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology for cell free synthesis of salivary proteins.

Speaker
Phil Lukas / University of Greifswald, Germany

Abstract

Various pharmaceutical nanocarriers, including liposomes and polymeric micelles, are frequently used for the delivery of a broad variety of both soluble and poorly soluble pharmaceuticals to enhance the in vivo efficiency of many drugs. Now, within the frame of this concept, it is important to develop multi functional stimuli-responsive nano carriers, i.e. nano carriers that, depending on the particular requirements, can circulate long; target the site of the disease via both non-specific and/or specific mechanisms, such as enhanced permeability and retention effect (EPR) and ligand-mediated recognition; respond local stimuli characteristic of the pathological site by, for example, releasing an entrapped drug or deleting a protective coating under the slightly acidic conditions inside tumors facilitating thus the contact between drug-loaded nanocarriers and cancer cells; and even provide an enhanced intracellular delivery of an entrapped drug with its subsequent delivery to specific intracellular organelles, such as nuclei, lysosomes or mitochondria. Additionally, these carriers can be supplied with contrast moieties to follow their real-time bio distribution and target accumulation. Among new developments to be considered in the area of multi functional pharmaceutical nano carriers are: drug- or/and RNA-loaded delivery systems additionally decorated with cell-penetrating peptides for the enhanced intra cellular delivery; �smart� multifunctional drug delivery systems, which can reveal/expose temporarily hidden functions under the action of certain local stimuli characteristic for the pathological zone (such as lowered pH, pedox-conditions, hypoxia, or locally increased expression of certain enzymes); new means for controlled delivery and release of siRNA; approaches for intracellular drug delivery and organelle targeting; application of nano carriers co-loaded with siRNA and drugs to treat multi drug resistant tumors; and nano carrier-based new targeted contrast agents for diagnostic imaging

Biography

Vladimir Torchilin got his M.S, Ph.D., and D.Sc. degrees from the Moscow State University and serves currently a University Distinguished Professor and Director, Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Nanomedicine, Northeastern University, Boston. He has published more than 400 original papers, more than 150 reviews and book chapters, wrote and edited 12 books, and holds more than 40 patents. Google Scholar shows more than 60,000 citations of his papers with H-index of 108. He is Editor-in-Chief of Current Drug Discovery Technologies, Drug Delivery, and OpenNano, Co-Editor of Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and on the Editorial Boards of many other journals. He received more than $30 M from the governmental and industrial sources in research funding. He has multiple honors and awards and in 2011, Times Higher Education ranked him number 2 among top world scientists in pharmacology for the period of 2000-2010.

Speaker
Vladimir Torchilin / Northeastern University, USA

Inivited Talks

Abstract

Biography

Ms. B.Rammyaa, Asst Professor, Department of Electronics and Instrumentation Engineering is working in KCG College of Technology, Chennai, India. She is pursuing Ph.D. in Anna University, Chennai. Her research interest includes Wireless communication, Mobile Ad hoc networks and Sensor Networks. She has published 12 papers in International journals and Conferences. She has 7years of Experience.

Speaker
Ms.B.Rammyaa / KCG College of Technology, India

Abstract

Biography

Daniil Nikitichev has completted his PhD in Physics in 2012 from University of Dundee, UK. Last 6 years he has been working at University College London developing novel imaging and 3D printing technologies for various medical applications. In 2017 he received a Chartered Engineer Status. He is a member of the Institute of Physics. The main area of the research are 3D printing, Medical Imaging (Ultrasound, Photoacoustic, MRI), multi-modality phantom development.

Speaker
Daniil I. Nikitichev / University College London,UK

Abstract

Biography

Speaker
Alexei A. Yeliseev / National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, NIH, Rockville, MD, USA

Abstract

Biography

I am Mr. Abdul Razzaq, working as lecturer at institute of molecular biology and biotechmology, University of Lahore and a PhD scholar at University of central Punjab Lahore. I have been working as senior scientist at BF biosciences limited- A therapeutic manufacturing company and working as project coordinator of a project on biofertilizers conducted between two reputed organizations, National Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE) and Ittehad Chemicals Limited (ICL) – Pakistan.

Speaker
Abdul Razzaq / The University of Lahore, Pakistan

Abstract

Biography

PhD (funded HEC, Pakistan) from Quaid-i-Azam University, Pakistan (awarded 2013) with two gold medals.Plant Molecular Biologist with 6 years national, international research experience in Plant Biochemistry and plant Molecular biology. Areas of specialization, Plant biotechnology, genetic transformation of plants with different transformation procedures, Lab-work experience in all molecular biology techniques, also interested in several bench top bioassays to determine the biological and phytochemical activities of secondary metabolites isolated from plants, analysis of metabolic pathways in plants and DNA sequencing of plants. Teaching experience at masters and MS levels in molecular biology and principles of gene manipulation. 6 months research experience at University of Warwick, UK. Currently teaching as a Lecturer in International Islamic University and supervising 3 research students.

Speaker
Bushra Hafeez Kiani / International Islamic University, Pakistan

Abstract

Biography

Arshad MehmoodAbbasi (PhD-Post Doc.) is working as Assistant Professor of Environmental Sciences at COMSATS University, Islamabad, Abbottabad Campus- Pakistan. Dr. Abbasi received his PhD in Ethnobotanical and Nutraceuticals aspects of plant species of Lesser Himalayas, Pakistan from Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad Pakistan in 2013. Dr. Abbasi research is mainly focused on: ethnobotany, nutraceuticals, medicinal and food plant resources and phytochemistry. To date Dr. Abbasi has authored 80 research articles and 3 Book Chapters and 2 Books published by Springer, USA in 2012 and 2015, respectively. So far, Dr. Abbasi has been awarded three outstanding research awards by Higher Education Commission (HEC) of Pakistan, Best researcher award by host University and foreign expert certificate by Chinese Government along with many other certificates. Dr. Abbasi is also serving as volunteer editor and reviewer of several journals of international repute including Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicines, Journal of Ethnopharmacology, Journal of Herbal Medicine, Food Chemistry, Pharmaceutical Biology, European Journal of Medicinal Plants, Pakistan Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine and Pakistan Journal of Botany among several others. Dr. Abbasi is also member of International Society of Ethnobiology; Society of Ethnobiology, University of North Texas, USA; American Chemical Society (ASC) and Institutional APIFP Champion: Asia Pacific Institute of Food Professionals.

Speaker
Arshad MehmoodAbbasi / COMSATS University, Pakistan

Abstract

Biography

Kathleen Hefferon received her PhD from the Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto and completed her postdoctoral fellowship at Cornell University. Kathleen has published multiple research papers, chapters and reviews, and has written three books. Kathleen is the Fulbright Canada Research Chair of Global Food Security and has been a visiting professor at the University of Toronto over the past year. Her research interests include virus expression vectors, food security agricultural biotechnology and global health. Kathleen lives in New York with her husband and two children.

Speaker
Kathleen Hefferon / Cornell University, USA

Abstract

Biography

Kirti Rani is M.Sc. (2000) and Ph.D. (2004) Biochemistry from Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak (INDIA) with Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak (INDIA) and in the collaborative research training with CSIR-IGIB New Delhi. She served Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh, INDIA and presently, she is working for Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Noida, INDIA (2008-till date). She has more than 100 publications/10 books/5 book chapters/12 filed national patents/ more than 30 abstracts. She is member, reviewer and editor of recognized international/ national scientific societies. She is awarded “Excellence in Teaching” and “Teaching and Research Excellence Award” in 2017 & “Dr A.P.J. Abdul Kalam Life Time Achievement National award” in 2018. She also awarded Certificate of Appreciation to be part of “Technical and Scientific Committee” for organizing various International Training programs in 2017 to 2018for African Candidates that organized by Honorable Nobel Laureate Sir Richard John Roberts FRS Directed “Sir Richard Roberts Center for Genetically Modified Organism”, of Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Noida with Biotech Consortium India Limited [BCIL), New Delhi and Sponsored by Ministry of External Affairs, Govt. of India.

Speaker
Kirti Rani / Amity University, India

Abstract

Biography

Ana Marques has completed her Ph.D. in Biotechnology and her postdoctoral studies from the Portuguese Catholic University. She has been involved in research activities since 2000, when she was a researcher at Technical University of Denmark working on the production of bioparticles for biofilm applications. Since 2002 she has been developing work at CBQF concerning the remediation of disturbed soils using plant-based technologies, with the application of biological tools. She has published 2 book chapters and 22 papers in international peer-reviewed journals, participated in numerous conferences and has been serving as a reviewer in several reputed scientific journals.

Speaker
Ana Marques / CBQF/ESB-UCP, Portugal

Abstract

Biography

Shah Rucksana Akhter Urme has completed her Bsc in Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering from Sylhet Agricultural University and continue Msc from the same University. She has attended National and International Conference. She is enthusiastic member of voluntary organization. She researched more than one year about pathogenic bacteria and now she enroll in a Environmental project work in National Institute of Biotechnology. She is very passionate about any scientific research.

Speaker
Shah Rucksana Akhter Urme / Sylhet Agricultural University, Bangladesh

Abstract

Biography

Annie Rathore completed her Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from University of California San Diego and Salk Institute for Biological Studies at the age of 25. Prior to that, she holds a Bachelor’s degree in Biotechnology from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Roorkee. She is a Life Science Consultant at Deloitte Management Consulting, one of the top consulting firms globally, advising top pharmaceutical companies on their R&D and Innovation Strategies. She has published extensively in top scientific journals and has been honored with multiple awards such as Women in Science Award (Salk Institute) and Khorana Scholarship (Ministry of Science and Technology, Government of India).

Speaker
ANNIE RATHORE / The University of California-San Diego and Salk Institute for Biological Studies, US

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