Conference Schedule

Day 01 Schedule

Jun 22, 2020

Plenary Talks

Title: Stroke Prevention in Older Adults: Recent Advances


Abstract


Most strokes (~ 90%) can be prevented, and preventing strokes reduces the risk of dementia. Recent advances that inform stroke prevention include: Nutrition: • The interaction between the toxic products of the intestinal microbiome such as trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which are renally excreted, and the decline in renal function with age, mean that with an eGFR <60, egg yolk should be avoided and meat intake limited. • Metabolic B12 deficiency is common in old patients, and often missed; it is an important opportunity for prevention of stroke and dementia • B vitamins do prevent stroke, but methylcobalamin should be used instead of cyanocobalamin Lipid lowering: • Cardiovascular risk increases with age, so the NNT with lipid lowering drugs is lower in older people • Additional observational evidence supports that lipid lowering therapy is beneficial in the old. • There is now RCT evidence that ezetimibe, alone or in combination with statin, reduces cardiovascular risk in old patients Anticoagulation: • Old patients benefit more than younger patients from anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation • The direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are not significantly more likely than aspirin to cause severe bleeding • It is a mistake to think that antiplatelet agents reduce the risk of cardioembolic stroke; anticoagulants are needed for this purpose • Atrial fibrillation is often missed by a single Holter recording, and there are additional reasons for anticoagulation besides atrial fibrillation


Biography


Prof. Spence obtained his MD, and specialty certifications in Neurology and Internal Medicine, at Western University in Canada, then did a Fellowship in Clinical Pharmacology at the Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California at San Francisco. He has focused on stroke prevention throughout his career. He pioneered the measurement of carotid plaque burden by ultrasound for risk stratification, research in genetics and risk factors, and treatment of atherosclerosis. His expertise includes management of resistant hypertension, B vitamin therapy for stroke prevention, lipid lowering therapy, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants, and management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis and patent foramen ovale.

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J. David Spence

Robarts Research Institute
Western University
London
Canada

Title:


Abstract



Biography


Helieh S Oz has DVM and MS (U. IL); PhD (U. MN) and clinical translational research certificate (U. KY Med Center). Dr. Oz is an active member of American Association of Gastroenterology (AGA) and AGA Fellow (AGAF). Dr. Oz is an immune-microbiologist with expertise in inflammatory and infectious diseases, mucosal Immunity, drug discoveries, pathogenesis, and micronutrient. Dr. Oz was PI recipient for NIH-NCCAM grant to investigate Green tea polyphenols and Inflammatory Diseases. Dr. Oz has over 90 publications in the areas of chronic inflammatory disorders (pancreatitis, hepatitis, colitis, periodontitis), microbial and infectious diseases (e.g. Toxoplasmosis, Trypanosomasis, Babesiosis, Pneumocystis pneumonia). Dr. Oz has served as Lead editor for special issues such as Gut Inflammatory, Infectious diseases and Nutrition (Mediators of Inflammation 2017); Nutrients, Infectious and Inflammatory Diseases (Nutrients 2017); Gastrointestinal Inflammation and Repair: Role of Microbiome, Infection, Nutrition (Gastroenterology Research Practice 2016), and co-editor for Parasitic infections in pediatric clinical practice (J Pediatric Infectious Disease 2016) and Chagas Disease, Intech Open Science 2017. Dr. Oz is a member of editorial board for different advisory committees and an avid reviewer for several peer-reviewed journals.

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Helieh S Oz

UK Medical Center, USA

Title:


Abstract



Biography


Dr. Dresner is a fellow of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, (ASOPRS). He is the director of the fellowship in Oculo-facial and Cosmetic Surgery at Eyesthetica sponsored by ASOPRS. He is an Associate Clinical Professor at the University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine. Dr. Dresner is the recipient of the Honor Award and Senior Honor Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology. He has published over thirty peer reviewed articles in major journals and numerous book chapters in Oculplastic text books. He lectures nationally and internationally. Dr. Dresner is the developer of the Medpor MCOI implant and the co-developer of the Medpor SST implant. He subsequently served as a fellow in Neuro-ophthalmology and Orbital Surgery under John S. Kennerdell, M.D. at the University of Pittsburgh. Following that, he received his fellowship training in Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at McGill University in Montreal with Francois Codere, M.D.

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Steven Charles Dresner

University of California, USA

Keynote Talks

Title: Immediate Healing for Personality Development.


Abstract


Statement of the problem: clients receiving psychotherapy require several sessions even if with drugs and use of will power over time. Purpose of the treatment: Achieving immediate non medicinal effortless painless healing without complications For personality development, relief of neurotic disease, psychosomatic symptoms and diseases, treating emotional obesity and smoking. Method: After joint analysis with Client and definition of psychological and physical goals of treatment, the healer as a trained behavioral, cognitive and logo psychotherapist arrives with client to a new corrected understanding of the case and roots of conflicts in childhood, taking around 2 hours, then in less than an hour performs non verbal interpersonal hypnosis with transfer of energy and telepathy to client till deep sleep when he implants the required personality , ideas, emotions, motives and attitudes into the subconscious embodying the required state. The subconscious and conscious mind will have same agreed upon analysis and targets for immediate results in that session of 3 hours Results: The healer got patent in Egypt 2016 for his discovery of The Immediate Healing for Personality Development and for mentioned purposes. Up till now treating more than 700 cases aging between 12 and 80 years with relief of more than 80% of cases either totally or mostly. Conclusion: immediate non medicinal revolutionary life transforming healing for a wide spectrum of cases achieving higher grades of maturity, insight, harmony and efficiency saving client time, effort, interests and complications. Also used to maturate community leaders to be a trouble shooter model efficient leaders with team spirit.


Biography


Dr Hadi Eltonsi a medical graduate trained in group psychotherapy , hypnosis, Silva mind control, NLP, Reiki Master, Pranic Healing,Life Couch, Mantra Yoga meditation among others courses for psychic powers, family constellation thru his medical study and practice then as a diplomat and Ambassador. He performed many TV, Radio interviews and seminars apart of two short American films about his work or inspired by his skills which were shown in international film festivals; the second got an award in Venice 2017.

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Hadi Eltonsi

Cairo University Medical Collage, Austria

Sessions:

Title: Management Issues Relating to the Aging Renal Patient


Abstract


Aging patients with decreased renal function have become more complicated to care for due to factors such as associated medical conditions, increased numbers of available pharmacologic agents and improved renal replacement therapies. Decision making has become more challenging. Topics to be evaluated as they apply to the elderly patient will include recognition of renal insufficiency, approaches to blood pressure control and treatment of metabolic disorders such as acidosis, hyperuricemia and hyperphosphatemia. New agents and their benefits and limitations will be noted. Effects of obesity and glucose intolerance will be reviewed. In addition, current approaches to renal status monitoring and importance of timing and type of access selected and timing and choice of renal replacement therapy for elderly renal failure patients will be considered. Finally, therapeutic end points as they apply to the elderly will be subjected to critical evaluation. General recommendations to achieve successful outcomes will be included.


Biography


Michael F. Michelis served as the Director of the Division of Nephrology at Lenox Hill Hospital for more than four decades as well as Professor of Medicine at the Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell. He received his BA at Columbia College, Columbia University in New York City, and his MD at George Washington University School of Medicine in Washington, DC. He received his Nephrology Training at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He is the co-editor of several medical textbooks, and he has published more than one hundred articles in the area of general nephrology, electrolyte disorders, hypertension, and geriatric renal disease.

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Michael F. Michelis

Lenox Hill Hospital, USA

Title: Patient Requirements Aware for Esthetic Smile and Healthy Periodontium


Abstract


Nowadays dental patient becomes more educated with different required cosmetic demands, and all concepts of Periodontal therapy are renewed to respond of esthetic patient requests and digital smile, these will increase awareness toward improvements in preventive dentistry and follow up periodic recalls for healthy periodontium. Therefore, an understanding of the impact of aging on periodontium becomes critical because so many risk factors locally or systemically and environment agents give standing up of bacterial periodontal diseases or disorders. Tissue preservation becomes the main aim of new esthetic dentistry, and oral-Periodontal deformities should be manage earlier as soon as possible. New periodontal attachment, regeneration of destructive alveolar bone, and muco-gingival tissue augmentation are the ideal outcomes of periodontal plastic surgery to obliterate periodontal pocket and reconstruction of periodontal tissues. All efforts are spent to decrease aging influences to loss tooth materials and retarding of the protecting defense mechanisms of the gingiva by decreasing repairing and keratinization, thinning of epithelium, collagene changes and fibroblasts, more elastic fibers, permeability, gingival recession, tooth mobility, loss attachment & bone accompany with changes in anatomic structures of periodontal tissues and immune responses.


Biography


A.P.Dr. Ossama Alkhatib had graduated in 1985 from Dental School-Damascus University, and started periodontal specialization after finishing Diploma in 1988, Master in 1993, he has completed his PhD in Periodontology at the age of 44 years from Damascus University and postdoctoral studies Board from Syria, he is member of AAP (1277), he is the academic director of Periodontology, Assisting. Prof. at Alfarabi Dental College In Jeddah –KSA. He has published more than 10 papers in different journals and has been serving as an educational board member of Alfarabi Dental College.

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Ossama Alkhatib

Alfarabi Dental College / Specialized Dental Center, KSA

Title: Blow Up Health Silos! Senior Oral Care Access Programs


Abstract


The older adult population is growing exponentially in America. By 2050, one in four adults will be 85 years or older. Statistically, adults sixty-five years and older show a 60% decline in accessing dental services on an annual basis. This results in increased levels of tooth decay, periodontal disease, and negative impacts on whole body health, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetic complications, and respiratory disease. A significant access to care senior challenge is cost, transportation, and the existing medical-dental segregation. Across the country, the need for increased access to dental services is being discussed, programs are being developed, and numerous communities are addressing this issue. However, program implementation types are varied, while many counties and some states have no discernible plan of action at this time. This study will compare and contrast three program models, funding streams, and community/professional collaboration outcomes. Based on this information, sensible planning and action can be taken by other states to blow up existing health silos to be restructured and integrated into equitable, accessible health care teams. This outcome will go far to meet health care needs of vulnerable populations in the United States and abroad.


Biography


Pam Cushenan, RDH, MS, FSCDH, ATI Air Force veteran Thirty-two-year dental hygiene practitioner President and CEO: SOFT Smiles© oral-focused education, training, and care programs for elders, special patients, and caregivers, 2006-present Assistant Professor, Georgia State University Perimeter Graduate Certificate in Gerontology Fellowship in Special Care Dental Hygiene (FSCDH) Resource Developer: oral health care solutions Local, State, National, International Speaker: symposiums, workshops, poster sessions, forums, and panels Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA), Georgia Association of Community Care Providers (GACCP), All About Developmental Disabilities (AADD), Sunrise, Ethica Health, Arbor Terrace, Annandale Village

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Pam Cushenan

Soft Smiles, United States

Title: Dying From Dirty Teeth!


Abstract


Sonya Dunbar, also known as the Geriatric Tooth fairy is a Registered Dental Hygienist, a national public speaker. Her passion for the geriatric community is always demonstrated in her passionate speaking events. Sonya has and over 27 years of dental experience in private practice, skilled nursing facilities, academia and marketing and has proudly served her country in the United States Navy. For the last 17 years, she worked in long-term care facilities as a Dental Hygienist


Biography


Many residents in skilled nursing facilities do not receive adequate oral care many do not get oral care at all daily. We all know that oral care has a significant impact on physical health and mental health including self-esteem and overall quality of life. In addition, there are many systemic diseases that have been directly linked to poor oral health such as aspirated pneumonia which sends many elderly people living in nursing homes to the hospital it is also probably the most common sequelae of poor oral health in the aged person. The plaque build-up on teeth has been found in the lungs of residents with pneumonia due to poor oral care. The lack of staff training has been one of the biggest challenges to overcome, along with access to affordable dental care. We can no longer turn our heads and ignore the deplorable situation that is killing aging adults in long-term care facilities.

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Sonya Dunbar

Geriatric Tooth fairy, USA

Title: Babies, Age, Lifespan, Whales, and The Etiology of Cataract and Dry Eye


Abstract


n regards to Cataract, our aim was to understand why rats get cataracts at two years, dogs at eight years and humans at 60 years. Bowhead whale lenses were studied since they are among the longest living mammals, living 200 years. In regards to dry eye disease, tear film stability decreases with age. Our aim was to determine how tear film composition, structure and function are related. NMR and FTIR spectroscopies were used to measure lipid composition and structure, respectively. The expected lifespan of the bowhead whale was the longest of the species measured in this study and the percentage of whale lens sphingolipid fit well in the correlation between the percentage of lens sphingolipid and expected lifespan. Bowhead whale lens membranes have a high sphingolipid content that confers resistance to oxidation, allowing these membranes to stay clear for a relatively longer time than is the case in many other species. If human lenses could be made to have a lipid composition similar to bowhead whales, like the whale, one could hope humans would not develop cataracts for over 100 years. Tear film lipids (TFL) contribute to the stability of tears. The changes in TFL composition with age and dry eye contribute to an increase in lipid order (stiffness) with age and dry eye. Strong lipid-lipid interactions could contribute to the aggregation of tear film lipids and contribute to a decrease in tear film spreading and dry eye.


Biography


Dr. Borchman is a Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Louisville and is the author of over 100 peer reviewed articles in scientific journals. He is/was principal or co-investigator on 7 major peer awarded government grants totaling over 10 million dollars to study cataract and dry eye. His 1st and last major NIH grants scored in the top 5% and 2% of the nation, respectively. He has given over 250 scientific presentations around the world. His publications are available at: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Douglas_Borchman.

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Douglas Borchman

University of Louisville, USA

Title: Nutritional inequity and incidence of chronic diseases in northern Ontario


Abstract


Access to food and nutrition in Northen Ontario is extremely varied with several subsections of the population facing persistent food insecurity and malnutrition risk.With over 500,000 people using a foodbank in 2019 and an annual increase of more than 4%, the situation is dire as it is. Additionally, this increase in the usage of foodbanks to supplement basic nourishment is significant for individuals dependant on employment income. Employment statistics show a marginal increase in unemployment, which suggests that employment income adjusting for inflation may be insufficient in procuring food. Older adults and adults with disabilities are particularly vulnerable due to the changing rules around accessing the Ontario Disability Supports Program (ODSP). Chronic malnutrition and a constant threat to food security are associated with several chronic health conditions such as anxiety, depression, chronic stress, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Northern Ontario has a higher incidence for certain types of cancers, obesity, osteoarthritis and cardiovascular diseases. Nutritionally, survey data from 2013-14 indicates that a mere 12-13% of the population meets the recommended intake for fruits and vegetables. While previous studies do not indicate a disparity between Northern Ontario and the rest of the province when measuring food insecurity, we propose that the disproportionality in acquiring cancers, obesity, osteoarthritis and cardiovascular diseases is more a function of long term malnutrition resulting from a poor understanding of nutrition itself. Our study explores the role of nutritional information, access and its dissemination in Northern Ontario and compares it to other more successful communities.


Biography


Krishnan Venkataraman has completed his PhD from the University of Vermont (UVM), USA and postdoctoral studies from UVM, USA, Regional Cancer Centre, Health Sciences North, Sudbury, Ontario and the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM). He is the director of Canadian Institute for Studies in Aging, a knowledge translation organization housed at Huntington University in Sudbury. He has published several papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member for Herald's Journal of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine.

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Krishnan Venkataraman

Huntington University, Canada

Title: The Psychological Challenge of the Elderly: Vision Impairment


Abstract


Ageing is part of life. With age, the body physically changes and there are psychological challenges are faced by visual impairment.. The study is substantiated by concepts, theories, and empirical findings that have accumulated under the umbrella of age-related psycho-ophthalmology. The focus is on adaptation theories in visually impaired older adults. One can understand the ageing through everyday competence, cognitive functioning, social functioning, and subjective well-being- related outcomes, depression, and adaptation processes. Loss of sight is strongly associated with chronological age and frequently used as an important marker of the awareness of getting ‘old’. Severe vision impairment has been found in of among the elderly. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of poor vision in the industrialized countries, Although macular degeneration treatment has significantly improved during recent years, currently available medical interventions can halt disease progression. Thus, the majority of older adults who are faced with degeneration are psychologically challenged to adapt to ongoing and progressive visual loss, which typically occurs as deterioration of the central visual field affecting reading ability, overall daily functioning, and mental health. Furthermore, other chronic conditions, such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, or diseases of the optic nerve that may occur more frequently in late life. This way the elderly need to adapt psychologically, as many times the treatment options may be limited. It is essential to highlight and understand the psychological consequences of age-related vision impairment and how such consequences may become a significant component of efficient treatment and rehabilitation. The psychological situation of the elderly with vision impairment is an important addition to ophthalmological research and treatment. The research also suggests the term age- related psycho-ophthalmology to cope with graceful ageing.


Biography


Vatika has completed her doctorate in Ageing in 2010. She is an Associate professor teaching for the past 20 year at St. Andrew’s college, university of Mumbai. She has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals.

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Vatika Sibal

St. Andrew’s College, University of Mumbai, India

Day 02 Schedule

Jun 23, 2020

Keynote Talks

Title: Temporomandibular Joint Management in Geriatric Patients


Abstract


Geriatric patients are prone to have a problem on the jaws due to the loss of the teeth and almost impossible reconstruction of the bite in the exact relation as was before. So, the importance of this structure is more in those patients. The TMJ is a complex joint both morphologically and functionally.TMJ disorders are common and often self-limited in the adult population. In epidemiologic studies, up to 75 percent of adults show at least one sign of joint dysfunction on examination and as many as one third have at least one symptom. However, only 5 percent of adults with TMJ symptoms require treatment and even fewer develop chronic or debilitating symptoms. Common symptoms of TMJ disorders include jaw pain, limited or painful jaw movement, headache, neck pain or stiff- ness, clicking or grating within the joint, and, occasionally, an inability to open the mouth painlessly. Examination of the TMJ and masticatory muscles should include careful palpation of all structures. Diagnostic testing and radiologic imaging of the TMJ have uncertain usefulness and generally should only be used for the most severe or chronic symptoms. Local anesthetic nerve blocking can be helpful in differentiating whether orofacial pain originates from the TMJ capsule or from associated muscular structures. Managemet of TMD in the geriatric patients is important because it would affact directly to the physical and mental health of them.


Biography


Temporomandibular Joint Disorders ,Jennifer J. Buescher, MD, MSPH, Clarkson Family Medicine Residency, Omaha, Nebraska Lateralcephalometriccharacteristicsof malocclusion patients with temporomandibular joint disorder symptoms, Chung-Ju Hwang,a Sang-Jin Sung,b and Suk-Joo Kimc Seoul, South Korea American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics April 2006 Temporomandibular Dysfunction and Headache Disorder, José G. Speciali, MD, PhD; Fabíola Dach, MD, PhD 2015 American Headache Society Discriminative ability of the TMJ Scale: Age and gender differences, T. F. Lundeen, D.M.D., MS., S. R. Levitt, M.D., Ph.D., and M. W. McKinney, Ph.D. University of North Carolina, School of Dentistry, and North Carolina Memorial Hospital, Chapel Hill, N.C., and North Carolina Central University, Durham, N.C.

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Ali Golmoradizadeh

Manila Central University, Philippines

Title: Teaching nutrition using civic engagement learning model at an HBCU/HSI College


Abstract


It is a civic engagement program that brings faculty, staff, and students together impact change on various topics including education into nutrition and ageing, diseases associated with diet, teenage and unplanned pregnancy, and the operation of community gardens. My talk is going to be focused on the pilot study I am conducting at a college to reverse the trend of obesity, heart disease and poor eating habits in the east side of San Antonio. It will cover will also cover my wellness and nutrition projects in Africa. 1. Encourage healthy eating habits through lunch and learn workshops at the garden or various nutrition programs hosted by the churches. 2. Educate the community on nutrition and ageing / related diseases through active research by students and poster presentation 3. Creating liaison between local chefs and nutrition classes in the community. 4. Increase routine medical checkups by hosting wellness week on campus with free medical checkup. 5. Increase our college’s footprint internationally Participant Outcomes: a) design a community based project, b) integrate learning assessment into civic engagement, c) Critical reflection on progress of project


Biography


Dr. Nforis an associate professor, PhD in higher education and administration from University of the Incarnate Word, and two masters degrees in Biotechnology (University of Texas at San Antonio) and Zoology (University of Buea), he is also a nurse and a medical laboratory technologist. He is the founder and coordinator of St. Philips college Jessicas Project, a civic engagement organization geared at educating students on current diseases. Founder and president of Past Present Future Africans (PPFA) Foundation, a non-profit organization on wellness and education in Africa.

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Solomon K. Nfor

St.Philips College, Texas

Title: Blood pressure lowering in the elderly: a note of caution about lower systolic pressures after SPRINT


Abstract


Since publication of the SPRINT trial of Intensive vs Standard Blood Pressure Control in adults age > 75 years, there have been calls to lower target systolic pressure to <120 mmHg, even in the elderly. However, there is a subgroup of patients whose risk of stroke will be increased with such a low systolic pressure: those with a pulse pressure > 60 mmHg. McEvoy et al reported that among patients with a pulse pressure > 60 mmHg and diastolic pressure <60 mmHg (PP>60DBP<60), there was a doubling of myocardial ischemia. This diastolic J curve occurs because virtually all of myocardial perfusion occurs during diastole. Park and Ovbiagele reported that patients with PP>60DBP<60 had a 5.85-fold increase in the risk of stroke. There are several reasons for this: More than half of cerebral perfusion occurs during diastole, and there is a large pressure gradient in the brain. When the blood pressure in the brachial artery is 117/75 mmHg, it is 113/73 mmHg in the lenticulostriate artery but only 59/39 mmHg in small branches in the posterior parietal subcortex. Furthermore, patients with a wide pulse pressure have stiff arteries are more likely to have a large cuff artefact, with true intra-arterial pressure being much lower than the cuff pressure. In such patients, when the brachial cuff pressure is <60 mmHg, the perfusion pressure in the small lobar arterioles may be below critical thresholds. Patients with PP>60DBP<60 should be regarded as a special subgroup in which very low systolic pressures should be avoided. For patients with resistant hypertension, physiologically individualized therapy based on plasma renin and aldosterone improves blood pressure control and reduces adverse effects.


Biography


Prof. Spence obtained his MD, and specialty certifications in Neurology and Internal Medicine, at Western University in Canada, then did a Fellowship in Clinical Pharmacology at the Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California at San Francisco. He has focused on stroke prevention throughout his career. He pioneered the measurement of carotid plaque burden by ultrasound for risk stratification, research in genetics and risk factors, and treatment of atherosclerosis. His expertise includes management of resistant hypertension, B vitamin therapy for stroke prevention, lipid lowering therapy, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants, and management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis and patent foramen ovale.

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J. David Spence

Robarts Research Institute, Western University, London, Canada

Sessions:

Title: Changing family structures, Social Support and their impact on the care of geriatric women in India


Abstract


Globalization, modernization, industrialization, urbanization, migration, education and exposure to western lifestyles are bringing changes in family structures, social values and lifestyle in Indian households thereby weakening the family ties. The demographic transition and changes in society are posing challenges to elder physical and emotional well-being. There is a paradigm shift in India from an elevated‐mortality society to a low‐mortality society which has increased the number of older adults. The difference between rural and urban old-age dependency ratio has increased significantly. Today’s demographic and cultural changes have decreased social support for older people due to changes in family structure, family roles and functions, and patterns of care given to older adults. Migration of children, lack of poor relationship between family members and poor social support in the family, insufficient housing, economic hardship and the break-up of joint family have made the elder adults more vulnerable. Older women suffering from frailty and incapacity due to chronic conditions and widowhood statuses require more extensive social support and care giving. Family structures can facilitate older women in providing basic economic and resource support, companionship, shared values, and competence to cope with stress and improve quality of life. Cohesive family networks and network size are important factors that help determine what social support elder women receive. There is an urgent need for family-oriented social policies to increase social support by family caregivers, friends, and communities which facilitate the capacity of older women to cope with stress and strains of aging and improve the quality of life. In the future, families must continue to provide substantial care for older women


Biography


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shoeb Ahmed Ilyas

Centre for Economic and Social Studies, India

Title: Care Options Available for Older Persons in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA): A Narrative Approach


Abstract


The number of older persons is on a gradual increase in the sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) region, most of whom are impoverished and with low level of education and in need of particular form of care which the region does not offer. There is a very sparse literature that documents care for older persons in SSA. This research was conducted to explore and document existing forms of care from each country in the region. I used existing published and unpublished reports from national and international organisations, governments and different internet search sources of published articles. The results show that only three countries in the region had institutionalised forms of care for elderly and this only in urban areas. The other 41 countries had no formal and institutionalised from or care, instead they families, churches, local community-based organisations and neighbours, which all provide short-term care. Older persons in rural areas were the most affected by lack of care, yet rural areas are classified among the most poorest, hard to reach and less developed. These results suggest a multi-sectorial collaboration in these countries, to jointly implement formal-long-term care models for older persons and the governments to institutionalise the social protection services for the aging. Some best practices were however documented from western countries and potential care model from the SSA region were highlighted, which if supported by both public and private sectors could become formal and long term care.


Biography


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Ganzamungu Zihindula

Tekano Health Equity, South Africa

Title: Why Fall is Denoted as A Geriatric Giant?


Abstract


Fall among the older people is one of most common scenario in our day to day clinical practice with its high impact on morbidity, mortality, hospital admission, impaired quality of life and resources. Moreover, previous history of fall plays an important role in the development of the next fall even though multiple factors are related to it. The other factors like instability, poor balance during standing, bradykinesia, impairment of memory, gait freezing, orthostatic hypotension, visual impairment, joint deformity and muscle weakness are other predictors of fall among the elderly people. The consequences of frequent falls may result in anxiety, reduced self-confidence, simple soft tissue injury to devastating hip fracture, cerebral contusion and brain hemorrhage. Even the economic burden of fall among the elderly patients is very high in many of the cases though it may vary from country to country and region to region. For this reason fall is denoted as a geriatric giant which would be a major public health concern in near future due to its high morbidity and mortality. But sometimes, few simple measures may prevent falls and finally reduce the morbidity and mortality among the elderly people by minimizing its consequences.


Biography


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Goutam Kumar Acherjya

BagherparaUpazila Health Complex, Bangladesh

Title: Therapeutic Management of Extensive Pressure Ulcer Affecting Occipital and Parietal Bone


Abstract


A female patient of 81 years, in good health condition, living on her own in a house suffered a stroke in 2001, and in 2010 she was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour (meningeoma). Apart from occasional memory loss and short term nausea she had no difficulties and could take care of herself. Following a visit she paid to her relatives in December 2013 she suddenly lost consciousness, fell and was left lying on a stone floor until her relatives found her after two days. She developed an extensive pressure ulcer in the location between her shoulder blades and the occipital and parietal bone in the scull, accompanied by loss of hair, skin, and subcutaneous tissue up to the bone in the area of 10x12 cm. After two months of hospitalisation at the Department of Neurology her general condition has been stabilised, she communicates, but her mobility is limited. The pressure ulcer between her shoulder blades heals quite effectively, the manifestations on the cranium are stagnant, the pressure ulcer shows callous margins, and the bone is coloured dark brown to black. Since March 2014 the therapy included gel preparations, and we also have commenced stem cell (fibroblast) therapy with a very good effect, in October 2015 an extensive pressure ulcer is complete healing. Last check June 2019 - patient without difficulty.


Biography


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Hana Zelenkova

Private Clinic of Dermatovenereology DOST Svidník

Title: Effects of Tai Chi Combined with Thera-Band Training On Wellbeing in Older


Abstract


Insufficient physical activity is widespread amongst older office workers and has adverse effects on their physical fitness and psychological wellbeing, as well as being a cause of pain. Tai Chi or resistance training has been reported to be a suitable physical activity intervention to improve older workers’ health conditions. However, no study has examined the use of Tai Chi combined with resistance training in this population. This study is the first known trial to test the effective-ness of Tai Chi combined with Thera-band (TCTB) training for health promotion in older seden-tary office workers, with regard to physical fitness, psychological wellbeing, and pain. Forty old-er office workers over 55 years participated in a pilot randomized controlled trial (i.e., TCTB in-tervention group or Tai Chi control group). Both groups received Tai Chi exercise for 12 weeks, 3 times per week, while participants in the intervention group also held a Thera-band using two hands when practicing Tai Chi. Participants completed outcome assessments at baseline, week 6, and week 12 of the intervention. Analysis of data found that there was a statistically significant interaction between intervention type and time with anxiety scores (p=.04) and pain scores (p=.02). In addition, there were significant differences between groups in the improvement of lower limb strength (p=.01) and right upper limb strength (p=.04). This study suggests that TCTB training has the potential to improve lower limb strength and upper limb strength in older sedentary office workers.


Biography


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Meiling Qi

Griffith University, Australia

Title: Oral Health and Aging Population: How to Retain Dental Prosthesis Longer


Abstract


Aging of baby boomers and longer life spans had lead to an increasing population of older adults. In the United States population of older adults is projected to double over the next four decades. The older adults are retaining their teeth longer and have more dental prosthesis. Older adults have compromised dental health due to medication-induced xerostomia, age-related gingival recession with exposed root surface, which is more susceptible to caries. Compromised medical health, physical or cognitive disabilities, and high caries risk maintain the existing prosthesis becomes a challenge. Teeth that are retained with the prosthesis are more prone to caries around their margins (recurrent caries). Prevention and treatment of recurrent caries around the margin of dental prosthesis become are challenge. Removing the prosthesis and replacing it with a new one is the only viable therapeutic option. The restorative option is expensive, time-consuming, and requires multiple appointments and involves technical difficulties. Restorative options could be a problem for older adults due to lack of finances, lack of transportation frailty, or lack of access to care. These issues require to treat multiple teeth at the same time, are less expensive, and do not a lot of time in treatment. Prevention becomes an area of paramount important. Prevention and treatment of recurrent caries through chemotherapeutic management can have an advantage of cost-effectiveness, speed and being minimally invasive. The most effective method for prevention to date is considered to be fluoride. In the United States fluoride has been incorporated in many ways like water fluoridation, fluoride mouth wash, dentifrices, and professionally applied fluoride varnishes. The American Dental Association (ADA) recommended the use of fluoride for patients of all ages who are at risk of developing dental caries. With the high success of fluoride, another treatment method using Silver Diamine Fluoride (SDF) is gaining popularity in the United States. We will discuss different preventive therapies for older adults to maintain their dental prosthesis longer.


Biography


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Shaista Rashid

University of New England, USA

Title: Prolonging Life Fit, Heathy and Self Organised: An End to Non Communicable Diseases (Ncds)? The Human Life Cycle: A Grand Zigsaw Puzzle; Trying To Put The Millions Of Pieces Together Not Knowing What to Make.


Abstract


Background: Life is a mystery where today we have uncountable pieces of the zigsaw puzzle that we are trying to put together to make the whole. Sometimes we stumble into the pieces and other frequent times we search for the new pieces. We get so engrossed in the depth and vastness of the puzzle pieces that we forget what to make of them, the total picture of the puzzle pieces we want to make without leaving any piece that is left out of place. Such is the complexity of life, the life cycle I would try to clarify through my keynote speech; an end to the NCDs by solving the grand zigsaw puzzle and prolong life, a fit life, depending upon nobody but self, family, a group and as the human race. The question; a struggle: Being born itself is a mystery to me fully unravelled and so is the growth and development, and yet details about from where and where to, why, how, when and where remains a mystery. We know and yet we forget that the pandemic of NCDs is pretty recent in this cosmic time, a few hundred to a maximum of a few thousands of years. We rarely explore the history to, and its evolution to, and put things known so far to know the root cause of all the NCDs that are early death and disability. Moreover, reality is just a social construction that becomes our own construction when we adopt it and adapt to it, if we do. Therefore, certain things we take for granted coupled with the monetarisation of the economy, businessization of every aspect of life, including the science and the minds. Deducted from the well known and proven scientific developments till today, I have constructed story of life that will clarify many myths and let us see clearly what led to the exponential burden of NCDs, shor and disabled lives (from the cardiovascular diseases, to Diabetes, other metabolic diseases, cancers, mental and psychological issues, autoimmune diseases, cancers and shorter and sicker lives, etc.). We, the doctors are always there to do the patch-work rather than doing justice to the medical practice. I would take you on a snap shot journey from the Sun to us humans and our internal cosmos-like body that should not have to go through early NCDs, related disability and an early death. I have gone through the available evidence and the results that convince me that at least 80%, if not more NCD burden could be contained and, or reversed in the world within 2-5 years if we all get together to start working on it through various available modalities. I have tried to explore the matter particularly within the last 20 years more than any of my time before that. The key issues explored and will be highlighted are as follows (for both the keynote speech and the workshop) Learning to communicate to learn and adjust to live in this all-encompassing environment while performing our duty as instructed by our life and living, skills and training, and the financial burden in the back of our mind. Ongoing Daily fuel requirement for living Origin of fuel 100% recyclability of the Nature’s nature and efficient and effective recycling ability Life cycle of the known Cosmos and recycling Our life cycle and recycling A simplified snapshot of our complexity (a cell function; insulin vs glucose) and the cardio-vascular system (the transport system). Our recyclability in our life, and certain major issues (storage, purpose and misuse due to ignorance) The Kitchen and the Cooking; Heat, Cost, Recycling, Wastage, Repercussions. Compare with the internal kitchen and the cooking and the specialists and what they produce, regulate and complement each other with, be in touch with everyone else 24/7, etc. Keep record of all that happens in a life time and carried forwards after the life time for the new life to begin with all the knowledge so acquired. Whats our better role and how to achieve health for all through shared wisdom.


Biography


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Suresh Vatsyayann

GNH Hospital, India

Title: Zahra Ghayoumi-Anaraki


Abstract


Objectives:Aging is often described by changes in cognitive functions which influences the capabilities of the language. Language plays a significant role in human life for establishing social interactions.Discourse is one of the four systems of language. Regarding the fact that the awareness of discourse features in the aging people can lead to improvement of quality of life in aging individuals, we evaluate the existence of age-related differences in narrative and persuasive discourses. These discourse types differ according to the linguistic and cognitive impacts that are placed on a person. Method: discourses of 91 adults ranged between 19 to 75 year olds which were divided into four age groups have been examined. After verifying the normality of the data, ANOVA andKruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare variables in different age groups. Results: There is a significant statistical difference between the coherence (one of discourse measures) in the aging group and each of the other three groups in both types of discourses. There is also a significant difference for the cohesion (one of discourse measures) variable between the elderly and the first age group just in narrative discourse. Discussion: The results of this study demonstrate that discourse is influenced by the aging and type (genre) of discourse task. Therefore, it is essential for clinicians to take into account the linguistic needs of aging people and incorporate them into their clinical programs to promote an Ageless Era.


Biography


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Discourse in Aging

Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran