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Plenary Talks

Abstract

Silicon photonics have long been pursued owing to the possibility of monolithic integration of photonics with high-speed Si electronics and the aspiration of broadening the reach of Si technology by expanding its functionalities well beyond electronics. To overcome the intrinsic problem of bandgap indirectness in the group-IV semiconductors of Si, Ge, and SiGe alloys, a new group-IV material platform consisting combinations of silicon, germanium, tin, and their binary and ternary alloys has been extensively investigated by many groups around the world, featuring: 1) the industry scalable growth; 2) compatible with current Si complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process; 3) capability of monolithic integration on Si; 4) the identified group-IV based direct bandgap materials; and 5) the tunable bandgap allowing the optoelectronic devices to operate over the broad spectral range from near- and mid-infrared to terahertz range. Over the past decade, plenty of promising results have been reported, such as GeSn lasers based on direct bandgap GeSn alloys, GeSn light emitting diodes (LEDs) and detectors operating in 2~3 µm. With tremendous novel electrical, optical, and mechanical properties, the newly developed GeSn devices could dramatically change the landscape of future microelectronics and photonics. This work presents an overview of the recent material development andthe demonstration of GeSn infrared detectors and imager as well as optically pumped laser followed by the prospect of using SiGeSn to achieve terahertz lasers based on a quantum cascade scheme.

Biography

Greg Sun received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in 1993. He is currently a professor in Electrical Engineering and founding Chair of the Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts Boston. His research interests are in optoelectronics, silicon photonics, and nanophotonics. He has published over 150 papers in refereed journals and book chapters, delivered over 150 invited and contributed conference talks, and given over 50 seminars and colloquia. As of November 2018, his work has been cited over 5000 times with the h-index of 41. He served on various conference and symposium committees and as a guest editor for Optics Express, ACS Photonics andJournal of Physics D: Applied Physics. He is now an associate editor for Journal of Lightwave Technology.

Speaker
Greg Sun / University of Massachusetts Boston, USA

Abstract

In this work we present the entangle measurements of a tripartite W-State entangled system in noninertial frame through the coordinate transformation between Minkowski and Rindler. Two cases are considered, i.e., when one qubit goes in uniform acceleration $a$ and the others remain stationary and when two qubits undergo in uniform acceleration and while the other is in stationary. The analytical negativities for one-tangle, two-tangle and -tangle in total are not written out explicitly due to complicated expressions, but we illustrate them in graphics and study their dependencies on the acceleration parameters rb and rc. We find that the negativities of the one-tangle, two tangle and -tangle decrease with the acceleration parameters except for NAB=NBA being a constant. The negativity NCIAB and the CI decrease faster than NA(BCI) and ( ). The negativities NACI (NB(ACI)) and NBICI decrease faster than those NAB and NABI, respectively. It is interesting to see that the phase transitions are occurred for the negativity NA(BICI) and the caused . This means that there exist a turning point at (rb, rc) for these quantities. The von Neumann entropy of tripartite system densities and are obtained analytically. We notice that they all increase with the acceleration parametersrb and rc.

Biography

Dr. Dong was born in 1969 at Dalian, China. He received his Ph.D. at Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China, in 1999. After that, Dr. Dong joined the Physical Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory of the University of Oxford as a Visiting Professor, Kansas State University as Postdoc Fellow, the National Autonomous University of Mexico as Visiting Professor, the Mexican Institute of Petroleum as Postdoc Fellow and Distinguished Visiting Professor, and the Superior School of Physics and Mathematics, National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) as full-time Professor through the program of excellent position, and he has a permanent position as Professor at IPN since 2007. He is the Regular Member of Mexican Academy of Sciences since 2012 and Visiting Professor at Louisiana State University in 2013. He received the maximum top prize “Presea Lazaro Cardenas” and was awarded by Mexico PresidentLic. Enrique Peña Nieto in President Palace in 2017. He is the (Academic, Chief) Editors and Editorial Board Members of more than 10 International Journals. He has authored and co-authoredmore than 200 papers (JCR), one book Chapter, one edited Book, two Books published by Springer. The citations are more than 6600 by Google Scholar.

Speaker
Shi-Hai Dong / National Polytechnic Institute, Mexico

Abstract

The high-order harmonic generation (HHG), ifphase matched, opens a unique way to produce high-flux coherentultrafast extreme-UV (XUV). We describe an efficient andself-phase matched method for scaling and narrowing thebandwidth of high-order harmonics in different transversalmodes based on femtosecond dynamic grating in a gas jet. Thegrating pattern introduces a phase modulation in the dipoleemission imprint such pattern in the gas medium. Thistechnique has potential of self-phase controlled XUVgeneration by adjusting the intersect angle and the ratio-intensityof interfering fundamental beams. The limitations ofusing high intensity laser fundamental pulses in gas, such asnon-negligible magnetic field, self-focusing, and plasmadispersion in the generated harmonics beam path can beaddressed using this technique. Another advantage of thetechnique is perfect phase-matched hard X-ray generationusing mid-IR driving laser where using long wavelengthdramatically decreases the HHG intensity.

Biography

Gholamreza Shayeganrad is research staffatthe University of Southampton. He is senior member of OSA. He received a B.S. and an M.S. from the Tehran University in 1998 and 2000, respectively. He received his Ph.D. in laser physics and laser spectroscopy from the AmirkabirUniversity of Technology in 2009. Upon his Ph.D., he was hired by I. Azad University as lecturer and his level was promoted to Assistant professor on 2009.From 2010 he worked in different multidiscipline international research environments.

Speaker
Gholamreza Shayeganrad / University of Southampton, United Kingdom

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Over the past decade, smart biomaterials have been extensively studied due to their excellent applications in various fields ranging from drug delivery, tissue engineering, 3D printing, heart repair, and molecular switches. Such materials indicate reversible or irreversible changes in physical properties or chemical structures in response to environmental stimulus such as temperature, pH, electric field, and ionic strength.Therefore, such unique properties allow us to design diverse types of self-regulated and stimuli-responsive systems.Recent advances and applications of biomolecule-responsive hydrogels in medicine via emphasizing this research area with novel biomaterials technology have shown great interest in medical applications. We will further show the recent application of these modifiedmaterials indrug/gene delivery, diabetes, biosensor, tissue engineering, and cell and cancer area [1-5]

Biography

Dr. Hosseinkhani has broad experience in life sciences and is expert in nanotechnology, biomaterials, drug delivery, 3D in vitro systems, bioreactor technology, and bioengineering stem cells technology. He has long experience in both academia and industry in biomedical engineering research and development, which includes several years of basic science research experience in a number of premier institutions related to the structure and function of biomaterials, and in polymer-based and mineral-based medical implants development in the medical device industry.He has been awarded several prestigious fellowships including JSPS Fellowship of Japan at Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University Hospital,ICYS Research Fellow of Japan at Notational Institute for Materials Science,IRIIMS Research Fellow of Japan at International Research Institute for Integrated Medical Sciences, Tokyo Women’s Medical University,Visiting Scientist at Center for Biomedical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA, and European Marie Curie Fellowship atNational University of Ireland.Dr. Hosseinkhani has several issued/pending patents, and has authored over 100 international publications in prestigious international journals and over 200 presentations at international conferences. He is the founder and chief science officer at Matrix, Inc. a world leading biotech company dedicated to healthcare technology to improve patient's quality of life.

Speaker
Hossein Hosseinkhani / Center for Advanced Technology, Matrix, Inc., USA

Abstract

Today big data or data science is emerge. The big data issue for big industries such as telecommunication, banking, healthcare and big educations environments such as research universities. We need big data analytic because it does reflect many high impact information needed in business and government and/or private sectors. The aim of this talk presenting reviewing elements of big data, current research work challenges issues in architecture design, store data and information/data retrieve. Datasets types such as cloud, bigdata security, software engineering solutions and bigdata search engines reviewed. In addition, with the exponential growth of data collected and available, the need to properly sort and use that data efficiently arises. This poses new challenges to agencies and almost all businesses. These huge amounts of data known as bigdata, and this presentation covers the machine learning techniques used and real world applications and good usage of the data collected. The scenarios of usage are countless and almost every company has to deal with this problem. However, bigdata have other form of definition in term of quantity and quality. Thus, whether servers needs to keep datasets (records) or mining unnecessary datasets is big challenging process. Therefore, bigdata techniques must have a reduction algorithms tools not compression techniques to obtain useful datasets. Keywords: big data, industries, data analytic, reduction, quality, quantity

Biography

Prof. Dr. Abdurazzag Ali Aburas received his Bachelor’s degree in Computer Sciences Tripoli University, Tripoli-Libya in 1987. He obtained his Master degree in Computer & Information Technology and PhD in Digital Image Processing from Dundee University and De Montfort University, UK in 1993 and 1997 respectively. He worked in Jordan and UAE universities, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, faculty of Engineering, International Islamic University Malaysia and International University of Sarajevo. At present time, working at University of KwaZulu Natal, School of Engineering, South Africa. He was working as visiting full Professor at Tec de Monterrey, San Luis Potosi Campus, Mexico. He has more than 50 publications in different international conferences and several papers in international journals. He has two research patents in Image processing filed. Recently, he gives consultation for IT Company as senior software developer. His areas of research interest are Big data/data science, Curriculum development, Digital Signal / image / video processing, Coding and Compression, Fractal and Image / Voice Pattern Recognition, Human Mobile Interaction, Algorithms. He is a member in IEEE, HCI-UK, ARISE and IMA Societies. He was a Member Board of Studies of Engineering Curriculum development (Review and Improvement). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, International Islamic University Malaysia. He introduced two new course curriculums for HMI (2015) and Programming for Engineering (2008). He is Coordinator of Cloud Computing and Mobile Research Group – CCMRG at present time and Coordinator of Software Engineering Research Group – SERG (2006-2009), IIUM. He has published new book based Engineering Education (2013) and Human Mobile Interaction (2015) and proposed publish his third book on Data Engineering in progress.

Speaker
Abdurazzag Ali Aburas / University of KwaZulu Natal, South Africa

Abstract

This presentation describes a new method for geometrical error compensation of precision motion systems. Laser interferometer is used to calibrate the machine system errors. The compensation is carried out with respect to an overall geometrical error model which is constructed from the individual error components associated with each axis of the machine. Three features are associated with this proposed approach. First, neural networks (NNs) are used to approximate the components of geometrical errors, thus dispensing with the conventional look-up table. This results in a significantly less number of neurons compared to the use of look-up table. Secondly, the direction of motion is considered in the compensator, i.e. a separate compensator is used when compensating for motion in the forward and reverse direction. This is important as the geometrical errors can be quite distinct depending on the direction of motion due to backlash and other nonlinearities in the servo systems. The overall geometrical error is computed from these NNs based on a kinetic equation for the machine in point. Thirdly, the Abbe error is explicitly addressed in the compensator. The adequacy and clear benefits of the proposed approach are illustrated from an application to an Anorads gantry positioning stage

Biography

Sunan Huang received his Ph.D degree from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1994. From 1995 to 1997, he was a postdoctoral fellow in the Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California at Berkeley. During 1997-2012, he was a research fellow in the Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore. During 2013-2014, he was a distinguished professor in Hangzhou Dianzi University. He is currently a senior research scientist in Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore. He has co-authored several patents, more than 120 journal papers, and four books entitled "Precision Motion Control" (2nd Edition, Springer) which has been translated into Chinese, "Modeling and Control of Precise Actuators" (CRC Press), "Applied Predictive Control" (Springer) and "Neural Network Control: Theory and Applications" (Research Studies Press). His work has been cited over 4700 times with the h-index of 40. He is a co-recipient of several Best Paper Awards and Supervisor Recognition Award for Champion Team (TSS 1st Singapore Engineering Design Challenge) in 2005. He is also a Member of the Editorial Advisory Board, Journal of Recent Patents on Engineering (2012-2014), a Reviewer Editor, Journal of Frontiers in Robotics and AI, and the Editorial Member, Journal of Advances in Mechanical Engineering. He is also a Session Chair for Asian Control Conference 2017, Session Co-chair for the 2018 International Conference on Unmanned Aircraft Systems, and Guest Editor on Special Issue on Precise Motion Control of Asian Journal of Control and Life System Modeling and Simulation of J. Applied Mathematics and Computation.He is also an invited Keynote Speaker at the Robots, Autonomous Vehicles and Deep Learning 2018.

Speaker
Sunan Huang / National University of Singapore, Singapore

Abstract

It is apparent that the presence of grain boundaries in active regions of solar cells, p-n junctions, and LEDs can affect the performance of the active layer. The main reasons for this are to be found in the ability of the grain boundary 1) to act as a trapping site to control recombination; and 2) to alterthe minority charge carrier diffusion characteristics (1, 2). Furthermore it has been demonstrated that the grain boundary character has a strong influence on the grain boundary effect, particularly on the ability of the boundary to create and absorb dislocations, which themselves can control trapping and recombination (2). This character can be controlled by grain boundary engineering. Grain boundary engineering, in its simplest form, is the control of grain boundary character by optimisation of the processing route (3). This presentation will review the mechanisms by which grain boundaries and associated dislocations can change the recombination and minority carrier diffusion rates, and describe the various aspects of grain boundary engineering needed to control the grain boundary characteristics. Grain boundary engineering will be classified under the following headings. 1) Diffusion. 2) Mis-orientation (including grain boundary plane, grain boundary width, coincidence site, low angle, and random boundaries).3) Impurity segregation (including the control of grain boundary micro-composition). 4) Energy (including the control of fracture resistance). 5) Grain size. 1) A. Zuschlag, G. Micard, J. Junge, M. Kas, S. Seren, G. Hahn, G. Coletti, G. Gia, and W. Sieifert, Investigations on the Recombination Activity of Grain Boundaries in MC Silicon’, Proc Conf. of IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists, June (2008). 2) K. Adamczyk, R. Sondena, G. Stokkan, E. Looney, M. Jensen, B. Lai, M. Rinio, and M. Di Sabatino, ‘Recombination Activity of Grain Boundaries in High Performance Multi-Crystalline Silicon during Solar Cell Processing’, J. of Applied Physics,123, 055705, (2018). 3) G. Palumbo, K.T. Aust, E.M. LeHockey, U. Erb, and P.Lin, Scripta Mat., 38, 1685, (1998

Biography

I have been involved with nuclear reactor materials research for almost three decades. I was employed as a consultant to UKAEA, Harwell from 1980-90, and have led a research group interested in nuclear reactor materials at Loughborough University since 1990, with funding support from Rolls Royce Naval Marine, EDF, Magnox, EPSRC, and Oak Ridge National Laboratories. My interests are in breeder blanket ferritic ODS steel development for fusion, radiation-induced grain boundary segregation of P in pressure vessel steels, and radiation induced chromium depletion in austenitic steels. Non-irradiation based interests, but still relevant to the current project proposal, are thermally induced chromium depletion modelling and experimental validation in Alloys 600 and 690, modelling and validation of microstructural evolution in ferritic and austenitic steels, and nickel base alloys, and its relation to creep and fracture toughness properties in these alloys. My international reputation in the understanding of grain boundaries is illustrated by my appointment as the leader of the EPSRC Network on Grain Boundaries between 1999 and 2006. I have written about 50 publications on grain boundaries and made may presentations on the topic at meetings worldwide. My overall mission is to provide, by modelling, a better understanding of microstructural changes occurring in high alloy steels and nickel based alloys in irradiation and high temperature environments. This mission is supported by a strong experimental expertise in high resolution microscopy techniques, most of which are available in the Loughborough Materials Characterisation Centre. I am Past-President of the East Midlands Metallurgical Society, Past-Chairman of the IOM3 Publications Committee, and past-Chairman of the IOM3 Younger Members Committee. I am also Past-Chairman of the Midlands Microanalysis Group.

Speaker
R.G. Faulkner / University of Loughborough, United Kingdom

Sessions:

Abstract

Light scattering due to birefringence has prevented the use of polycrystalline ceramics with anisotropic optical properties in applications such as laser gain media. However, continued technological advancements in ceramic processing technology have made it possible to tailor the microstructural, mechanical and optical properties of different transparent medias. Their medias have applications in various fields of strategic and civilian sectors. More recently, interest has focused on the development of high optical polycrystalline transparent ceramics (PTC)materials. Optical transparency requires high purity and high density. Hence Polycrystalline Transparent Ceramics (PTC)technology is upcoming technology in this area which is tending to replace the Single Crystal Growth technologies. The PTC are being produced through wet chemical synthesis routes as well as solid state routes. The wet route processes are capable to counter the challenges of purity and higher chemical stability requirements to achieve high-purity final products. Due to the development of nano powder production methods transparent ceramics allow wide range of rare-earth-ion-doping concentrations to attain different properties for wide range of applications. The present work deals with the preparation of Yttria (Er:Y2O3) nano-powders based polycrystalline transparent ceramics due to their high theoretical transmittance, outstanding refractoriness, broader range of transparency (0.2-0.8m), lower emissivity, superior chemical stability as well as a smaller absorption coefficient in the infrared (IR) region.In this research work Ammonium Hydrogen Carbonate (AHC) and ammonium sulfate used as a precipitant and surfactant. The powder characterization of (Er:Y2O3)nano powders were examined by using various analytic techniques such as FTIR, Raman, XRD, and FESEM, EDX. The mechanism of low temperature synthesis will also be discussed.Our current understanding of the process and the scope of future work will be presented.

Biography

Sushil Kumaris Ph.D. Research Scholar in the Department of Materials & Metallurgical Engineering at Punjab Engineering College (Deemed to be University) Chandigarh -India. (https:// www.pec.ac.in). Presently, he is doing his research under Ministry of Human Resources and Development (MHRD-India) funded research project entitled ‘Transparent Ceramic Materials & Technology'. The main aim of the project is setting up a Design Innovation Centre (DIC) in the Department of Materials & Metallurgical Engineering at Punjab Engineering College (Deemed to be University). He received his B.Tech in the field of Mechanical Engineering (2007-2011) from Punjab Technical University (PTU)- India and Master of Engineering in the field of Industrial Materials and Metallurgy (2011-2013) from Punjab Engineering College (Deemed to be University) Chandigarh –India. He received his Ph.D. in Materials & Metallurgical Engineering (2014-2019)from Punjab Engineering College (Deemed to be University) Chandigarh –India. He has presented his research work in various National and International conferences in India and abroad. He has been active member in several professional societies such as UK Ceramic Research Society, European Ceramic Research Society and American Ceramic Society (ACerS) of USA.His current areas of research are Thin Films, Bio ceramic coatings, Synthesis of advanced ceramic nanopowders, High temperature sintering, and related advanced materials characterization techniques (FESEM, XRD, FTIR, TEM, etc).

Speaker
Sushil Kumar / Materials & Metallurgical Engineering Department, Chandigarh

Abstract

As it is well-known, a Self-Mixing Interferometer (SMI) is based on the optical feedback effect produced by a remote target illuminated by the laser beam, resulting in a modulation of the cavity field that carries optical phase-shiftinformation like in a conventional interferometer, but with a much simpler setup devoid of any optics external to the laser. In this paper, we present a state-of-the-art overview of the applications of SMI to tasks of interest for mechanical engineering. In particularwe will consider: the high-resolution (micrometer) and wide dynamic range (up to meters) measurement of linear displacements such as required by the machine-tool lathes, the measurements of attitude angles (tilt, yaw and roll of the tool carriage) with second-of-arc resolution, the measurements of sub-nanometer to millimeter amplitudes of vibrations for the characterization of transfer function of mechanical structures and non-contact mechanical hysteresis cycle, and last but not least, the (non-incremental) absolute distance measurement, obtained by sweeping the wavelength of the phase measuring interferometer. All these measurements are carried out without physical contact on the remote target – representative of the tool-carrying turret of a tool-machine. Along with the advantages of SMI – compactness, low cost, minimum invasiveness, ease of use and good accuracy, we will illustrate the typical performance achieved by the basic SMI sensors, that is, the versions requiring a minimum of circuits functions for signal processing, and discuss special features and problems of each approach.

Biography

SilvanoDonati is Emeritus Professor of Optoelectronics at the Department of Electronics of University of Pavia, Italy, and Full Professor in Optoelectronics at the Faculty of Engineering from 1980 to 2012. He heads the Group of Optoelectronics active on photodetector and noise, electro-optical instrumentation and semiconductor devices for chaos and switching applications.He is the credited inventor of self-mixing interferometry and of chaos-shift-keying (CSK) cryptography, the topic covered in his Distinguished Lecture given in 21 IEEE LEOS Chapters in two years, 2008-10.He is the Author of two book, ‘Photodetectors’(Prentice Hall, 1999), and ‘Electro-Optical Instrumentation’ (Prentice Hall, 2004) this last translated in Chinese (Jiao Tong University Press, 2006) and available also in India edition, as an e-book paperback (2008), and as an e-book Kindle edition (2009). He also authored or co-authored over 350 papers on peer-reviewed Journals.His seminal ten papers collected 5000+ citations. His H factor is 35. He has been LEOS Vice President Region 8 Membership (2002-04), LEOS Board of Governors (2004-06), and LEOS Distinguished Lecturer, and Member of the Fellow Board. He has been Chair of the Italy Section for the term 2008/09.He has been Visiting Professor in University of New Mexico (1992), NTU-National University of Taiwan (2005), Universidad Catolica del Peru (2006) and National Sun Yat Sen University (2007, 2008, 2010), Cheng Kung University (2011) ChungHsing University (2013-14), National Taipei Institute of Technology (2014-16), and NTU (2017). He has been the Guest Editor of several Special Issues, (JSTQE Sept. 1999), (IoP Journal of Optics A 1998 and 2002, SPIE Optical Engineering. 2001) of a Feature Issue on Photodetectors (2004), and a Special Issue on Self-Mixing Interferometry (SPIE Optical Engineering, May2018)

Speaker
Donati Silvano / SilvanoDonati, University of Pavia, Italy

Abstract

A criterion of the degradation/oxidation susceptibility of organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells in aqueous solutions was proposed for the first time. The criterion was derived based on calculating the limit of the ratio value of the polarization resistance of an OPV cell in aqueous solution (Rps) to the polarization resistance of the OPV cell in air (Rpair). In other words, the criterion lim(Rps/Rpair) = 1was applied to determine the degradation/oxidation of the OPV cell in the aqueous solution when Rpair became equal (increased) to Rps as a function of time of the exposure of the OPV cell to the aqueous solution. This criterion was not only used to determine the degradation/oxidation of different OPV cells in a simulated operational environment but also it was used to determine the electrochemical behavior of OPV cells in deionized water and a polluted water with fine particles of sand. The values of Rps were determined by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at low frequency. In addition, the criterion can be applied under diverse test conditions with a predetermined period of OPV operations.

Biography

Speaker
Khaled Habib / 1Materials Science and Photo-Electronics Lab, Kuwait

Abstract

Itmay be possibletoestablish an analogybetweentheuniversespaceand a pressurevesselinner body shelle.g. a superheatedsteampowerboiler. Basically ,theuniverse has a periodicthermodynamiccycleconsisting of a conversionprocessbetweenenergyandmatter. Theuniversespace is full of undefinableamounts of energystacksandmatters.Theforms of theseenergystacksandmattersarealsouncertain. That is, boththequalityandquantity of them can not be introduceddefinetely. Sometimes ,theyarecalled as “darkenergy” and “darkmatter”. Theaccumulation of energystacksmay be very dense withinsomeregions of theuniversespace. Theblackholes, wormholes, neutronstars, supernovas, planetarystars ,planets, exoplanaterysystems, pulsarsandgravitationalforceshavegreatamount of energyandmatterwithintheirmysteriousstructures. A greataccumulation of energy, existingwithinthespaceanywhere, give a magnificientopportunityto be ableto evenbendthespaceand time.Therearemillions of galaxiescontaininghugeamounts of energyincludingthecosmicradiationandgravitationalwaves. Theregion of interstellarmedium is alsoanotherindefinetesourceforenergyandmatter. Theentropyhaveto be identified in orderto be abletounderstandtherealaspects of thermodyanmicalbalanceassociatedwithenergy transfer analysis of theuniversespace. An anology can be madetostatethe model of such a thermodyamicalcyclewithintheuniverseitself. Thisanology can be an engineeringtechniqueapproachand a pressurevesselmay be accepted as a model fortheuniversespace. Themostappropriatepressurevessel can be asuperheatedsteampowerboiler, thereforethe problem can be solved as if it is an ordinarytechnicalsituation. Regardingthelaw of conservation of energy,thereshould be a total mas andenergybalancethroughalltheuniverse , verysimilartothesituationas forthesuperheatedsteampowerboilerwhich is one of the main equipmentfor a conventionalpowerproductionplantsystem. Additionally, byconsideringthesecondlaw of thermodynamics , therearealwayslossesfortheenergysystemsand it is not possibletoreachfullhundredpercentefficiencyrate, neitherforthosesystems, as in thecase of a steamboilerorpressurevessel , noras forthewholeuniverse , howeverthe totalenergyandmassarealwaysconserved on conditionthattherearesomeenergyandmatterconversionprocessesbalancingthethermodynamics of universeand of theboilersystem as wellif an anology is establishedbetweenthespaceuniverseandthe steamboiler,which is a kind of a pressurevessel. Since thereare a lot of losses, the entropy of theuniverseshouldalwaysincrease , thatmeanstheuniverse is under a greatpressure. Therefore ,theuniversespacemay be accepted as a superheatedsteampowerboilerif it is treatedlike a pressurevessel ,a part of theenergysystem.Besides, an anology can be establishedfortheenergy transfer analysisbetweenbothsystems, whicharetheuniversespaceandthesteamboilerwhentheyarebothconsidered as pressurevessels. Anotherpoint of view is torealize an approachforexergy (availability)andanergy of theentiresystem, since the total energy is equaltothesum of exergyandanergyamounts.Thatis, “Energy =Exergy + Anergy” , indicatingtheformulation as E= Ø + A, representing E forEnergy, Ø forExergyand A forAnergy, respectively.Thisbalancingthermodynamicalformulation is validforboththeanalogicalsystems, whicharetheuniversespaceandthesteamboiler, ifboth of themhave acommontechnicalanology of pressurevesselfromtheaspect of energy transfer analysisandconversion of energyandmatterwhiletheybothhave in dynamicoperationalcyclemode.The main scientificparametersgoverningthisequation, which is E= Ø + A , can be stated as follows: pressure, temperature, flow rate, enthalpy, entropy, specificheat, internalenergy as well as thecosmicradiationparameters. Alltheseparametersprovidethethermodynamicalbalanceassociatedwithenergy transfer analysis of theuniversespace as a pressurevesselanalogy. As a result, it is possibleto say thatsuch an anologyfortheuniversespace can certainlybe realizedand itmeansthatouruniverse has a periodicthermodynamicalcycleandenergy-massbalanceconsisting of a conversionprocessbetweenenergyandmatterandthethermodynamicalcycle of theuniverseis verysimilarto a boilerpressurevesselsystemwhich is the main part of a powerplantandenergyproductionsystem.Theenergy transfer analysisforbothsystems has alsothesameanology.

Biography

Asst. Prof. Dr. Emin Taner ELMAS, is an “AssistantProfessor” and “Head of Department” of “EnergySystemsEngineering” of “Faculty of EngineeringAnd Natural Sciences” at Iskenderun Technical University (İSTE) in Turkey. He has alsoservedas the “Director of EnergyInstitute” of İSTE- Iskenderun Technical Universityandalsoa universitysenatemember at İSTE. His jobtitle is DR. MechanicalEngineer, M.Sc., Ph.D., and he wasborn in 25/06/1974 in Sivas / Turkey. He has graduatedfromfaculty of MechanicalEngineering as B.Sc. in 1995 andthencompleted his M.Sc. in “Energy” at MechanicalEngineeringDepartment of Dokuz Eylül University in İzmir, Turkeyandafterthat he received his Ph.D. in “Thermodynamics” at MechanicalEngineeringDepartment of Ege University, in İzmir, Turkey. He has worked in variousindustrialcompanies at differentscope of supply, sectors, subjectsand at differentpositions, e.g. Site Chief, Project Manager, Management Representative, Quality Manager, Factory Manager, Energy Manager, R&D Manager (CSO-ChiefScienceOfficer , CTO-ChiefTechnologyOfficer), Business Development Manager (CBDO-Chief Business Development Officer), Deputy General Manager and General Manager. He has beenserving as a Peer Reviewerandmember of SCIEI- ScienceAndEngineeringInstitute. Asst. Prof. Dr. ELMAS has served as a Peer Reviewerfor NPP- NASA Postdoctoral Program (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, USA) and USRA (Universities Space ResearchAssociation, USA). He has alsoserved as a Peer Reviewerforsome NASA EPSCoRand NASA EPSCoR ISS Proposalprojects. He has alsomadepeerreviewsforvariousarticles / publicationsforsomeuniversities. Asst. Prof. Dr. ELMAS has alsobeenserving as a PeerReviewerandmemberfortheEducationCommittee of ASME (AmericanSociety of MechanicalEngineers) International GasTurbineInstitute. He is alsomemberof AmericanEnergySociety (AES).

Speaker
Emin Taner ELMAS / İskenderun Technical University (İSTE) ,Turkey

Abstract

Shape memory effect is a peculiar property exhibited a series of alloy system called shape memory alloys. Two successive structural transformations, thermal and stress induced martensitic transformations govern shape memory this phenomena in crystallographic basis. Shape memory effect is performed thermally in a temperature interval on heating and cooling after deformation in low temperature phase condition, therefore this behavior is called thermoelasticity; superelasticity is performed mechanically by stressing and releasing at a constant temperature in the parent austenite phase region. Thermal and stressing processes in physical basis, and twinning and detwinning processes govern shape memory effect in crystallographic basis. Thermal induced martensite occurs as twinned martensite in self-accommodating manner on cooling, and twinned martensite structures turn into detwinned martensite by means of stress induced martensitic transformation on stressing. Thermal induced transformation occurs as martensite variants with lattice invariant shears on the {110}-type close packed planes of austenite matrix. The {110}-plane family has 6 specific planes; (110), (-1 1 0), (1 0 1), (-1 0 1), (0 1 1) and (0 1 -1). Lattice invariant shears occur in both sides of these planes; therefore crystallographically equal 24 martensite variants occur in different orientations. The materials are deformed in superelasticity, and shape recovery is performed simultaneously upon releasing the applied stress. Superelasticity is performed in non-linear way; stressing and releasing paths are different in the stress-strain diagram, and hysteresis loop refers to energy dissipation. The elementary processes involved in such martensitic transformations are essentially shear deformations, lattice invariant shears, and shuffling of atomic planes. These deformations occur with cooperative movements of atoms on close packed planes of ordered parent phase lattice in displacive manner. The atomic plane shuffling and shearing can be considered as elementary processes activated during displacive martensitic transformations. Atomic plane shuffling and lattice shearing is not uniform in copper based shape memory alloys, and cause to the formation of long-period layered complex martensitic structures with lattice twinning on cooling. Electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction studies performed on two copper based CuZnAl and CuAlMn alloys show that these alloys exhibit super lattice reflections in martensitic condition. A series of x-ray diffractions were taken duration aging at room temperature. Diffraction results show that diffraction angles and peak intensities of some peak pairs providing a special relation change with aging duration. This result refers to redistribution of atoms and a new reaction in diffusive manner and leads to the martensite stabilization. Keywords: Shape memory effect, martensitic transformation, thermoelasticity, superelasticity, lattice twinning, detwinning

Biography

Dr Adiguzel graduated from Department of Physics, Ankara University, Turkey in 1974 and received PhD- degree from Dicle University, Diyarbakir-Turkey. He has studied at Surrey University, Guildford, UK, as a post doctoral research scientist in 1986-1987, and studied on shape memory alloys. He worked as research assistant, 1975-80, at Dicle University and shifted to Firat University, Elazig, Turkey in 1980. He became professor in 1996, and he has already been working as professor. He published over 60 papers in international and national journals; He joined over 100 conferences and symposia in international and national level as participant, invited speaker or keynote speaker with contributions of oral or poster. He served the program chair or conference chair/co-chair in some of these activities. In particular, he joined in last five years (2014 - 2018) over 50 conferences as Keynote Speaker and Conference Co-Chair organized by different companies. He supervised 5 PhD- theses and 3 M.Sc- theses. Dr. Adiguzel served his directorate of Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Firat University, in 1999-2004. He received a certificate awarded to him and his experimental group in recognition of significant contribution of 2 patterns to the Powder Diffraction File – Release 2000. The ICDD (International Centre for Diffraction Data) also appreciates cooperation of his group and interest in Powder Diffraction File.

Speaker
Osman ADIGUZEL / Firat University, Turkey

Abstract

Growing demand of laser for medical and defence application have posed new challenges and stressed the existing technologies of its production techniques. Czochralski and Bridgman method till recently have been successfully catering the growing demands for laser host materials. The Czochralski method is one of the most widely used commercial technique, at ambient temperatures approaching as high as 2300-2500°C in an iridium crucible, it produces single crystals by pulling seed crystals from the melt. The process lasts for weeks, leading to inculcation of impurities from the crucible. Further, size of the single crystal that can be produced is also a limiting parameter. The stresses induced during the fabrication are also resulting in crystal fracture and wave front distortion. Synthesis of Polycrystalline Transparent Ceramics (PTCs) is new spearheading technology in this area which has effectively taken care of the challenges that is limiting the Single Crystal Growth technologies. The PTCs are being produced through sintering of the powders. Recent advances in synthesis of nano scale high purity powders and sintering techniques the PTCs are turning to be favourite routes for laser host materials. Nano synthesis routes are capable to counter the challenges of purity, size, chemical stability, optical coherency and transparency requirements of the product.PTCs produced through Nano powder production route are capable to be designed for their chemical coherency, phase uniformity and morphological requirements for their sintering. Despite their polycrystalline nature PTCs produced by this technique exhibit high theoretical transmittance, outstanding refractoriness, superior chemical stability and thermo-mechanical properties very close to those of single crystals. Present work deals with the production of Yttrium Aluminium Garnate (YAG) powder with high purity, narrow particle size distribution and noble morphological control to the powders. YAG nano powder has been fabricated by the Co-precipitation and Urea precipitation method by using the aluminum nitrate and yttrium nitrate as starting materials. Ammonium hydrogen carbonate (AHC) and urea are used as precipitants in Co-precipitation and Urea precipitation process respectively and precursors are calcined in the temperature range of 1200-1400oC. The reaction mechanism has been investigated using different advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Dynamic light scattering (DLS). Crystallite size obtained is in range of 27-45 nm with nearly spherical shape. FTIR results also confirm the formation of YAG powder and XRD shows the purity of phases produced powders. Minimum particle size obtained in Co-precipitation method is 515nm and in Urea precipitation method is 105nm. Resulted yield is in range of 81-83% at different calcination temperatures. The mechanism of low temperature sintering during synthesis will also be discussed.Our current understanding of the process and the scope of future work will be presented.

Biography

JD Sharma is Associate Professor and is presently Head of the Department of Materials & Metallurgical Engineering at Punjab Engineering College (Deemed to be University), Chandigarh-India, He also currently acting Dean Alumni, Corporate &International Affairs and Head of the Department of CIM at PEC- Chandigarh. He received B.E.in Metallurgy and Masters in Industrial Materials & Metallurgy from Panjab University, Chandigarh. He received his Ph.D. inthe area of Material Development from Panjab University, Chandigarh (India) in collaborative work with IIT Roorkee in 2013. He has organized several workshop and Symposiums. He has been an active member in several professional societies such as Indian Institute of Metals, Kolkata as Gen. Secy Chandigarh Chapter, life member of Indian Shock wave society and member of American Ceramic Society (ACerS) of USA.His current areas of research are Transparent ceramics, thin films and Blast mitigation for defence application and so on.

Speaker
JD Sharma / Materials & Metallurgical Engineering Department, chandigarh

Abstract

: The strategy of price liberalisation and privatisation had been implemented in Sudan over the last decade, and has had a positive result on government deficit. The investment law approved recently has good statements and rules on the above strategy in particular to pharmacy regulations. Under the pressure of the new privatisation policy, the government introduced radical changes in the pharmacy regulations. The 2001 Pharmacy and Poisons Act and its provisions established the Federal Pharmacy and Poison Board (FPPB). All the authorities of the implementation of Pharmacy and Poisons Act were given to this board. This article provides an overview of the impact of the pharmaceutical regulations on the quality of medicines on the Sudanese market from the perspective of the pharmacists working with drug importing companies. The information necessary to conduct the evaluation was collected from 30 pharmacists who are the owners or shareholders in medicines’ importing companies. The participants were selected randomly. 89% of respondents considered the medicines on the Sudanese market are generally of good quality. The design of the research itself may be considered inadequate with regard to selection process. However, the authors believe it provides enough evidence, and the current pharmaceutical regulations have some loopholes. The Pharmacy, Poisons, Cosmetics and Medical Devices Act-2001 and its regulation should be enforced. The overall set-up including the Act itself needs to be revised.

Biography

Speaker
Abdeen Mustafa Omer / Ministry of Health, Khartoum, Sudan

Abstract

Composite Solar Textiles for sustainability is an emerging theme for the twenty-first century, Renewable energy systems that take advantage of energy sources that won’t diminish over time and are independent of fluctuations in price and availability are playing an ever-increasing role in modern power systems. Composite Solar Textiles -powered photovoltaic systems are entering the marketplace that will generate electricity without pollution is on the horizon. New technologies on both sides of the meter leading to structural changes in the way that power is provided and used, an emerging demand for electricity in the developing countries where some two billion people now live without any access to power, and increased attention being paid to the environmental impacts of power production are all leading to the need for new technology in architecture and create design for flexible photovoltaic materials, that may change the way buildings receive and distribute energy. Through the investigation, we have identified the most efficient, cost effective solar and energy conservation technologies appropriate for residential construction. The momentum generated during the 1970s has been lost and today we find ourselves in grip of anther energy crisis. With global energy, demand increasing dramatically, one minor disruption in supply could have catastrophic consequences. The population is increasing fast, while the resources of energy such as electricity as basic resource for lighting and heating are limited. Hence, the ratio of consumer to electricity, gas is increased and the energy gap is worsening. In addition, during the cold weather, the heating process is necessary for buildings residence and farms. For that the Energy Price going up to two or three times in winter, with same production, Fortunately; Egypt has sunny days all the year; the sun is clean energy as alternative energy of Electricity and Gas. The new materials of Composite Solar Textiles, work like the new-familiar photovoltaic cells in solar panels. Made of semiconductor materials, they absorb sunlight and convert it into electricity. The proposal project is pushing the envelope of energy-efficiency architecture and provides an actual application of solar textile materials as new source of clean energy without having to compete with the centralized grid.

Biography

ELSAYED AHMED ELNASHAR, Full-Professor of textiles Apparel, Kaferelsheikh University, Egypt. Born in 19 /8/1965. Have Ph.D. 2000, Msc.1995, Bsc.1989, Helwan University. Diploma1985advanced industrial textiles institute. He holds several academic administrative positions: Dean, Vice Dean, Head of Department, He has many textiles patents, Member of international scientific committees. Development of Faculties of Education, commissioned of Supreme Council of Egyptian Universities. Has design books published in Germany and Ukraine. Has published over 185 scientific Articles. Editorial board member & Reviewer for more 85 journals, organizer for more than 30 conference and workshop over the world, Founder and editor two scientific journals. And Smartex Conference Egypt. Member of the editorial board of several international journals and conferences, He has made many scientific agreements with European &Africa universities

Speaker
ELSAYED AHMED AHMED ELNASHAR / Kafrelsheikh University, Egypt

Abstract

AS OPTICS AND PHOTONICS EVOLVE, OPPORTUNITIES WILL CONTINUE TO EXPAND AND WILL BE ENDLESS. A NEW REPORT FROM THE NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL DEFINES RESEARCH PRIORITIES AND CHALLENGES THAT WOULD FILL GAPS IN OPTICS AND PHOTONICS, TECHNOLOGIES THAT HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO ADVANCE THE ECONOMY OF THE UNITED STATES AND PROVIDE VISIONARY DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS. AS HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS OF DOLLAR POUR INTO ROCHESTER TO ESTABLISH THE NATION'S FIRST PHOTONICS HUB, "THE FUTURE OF PHOTONICS." WHEN PHOTONICS HUB IS FINISHED AND OPERATIONAL, THE FUTURE OF PHOTONICS IS LIMITLESS. PHOTONICS HAS ITS ROLE IN THE CONTINUING DEVELOPMENT OF OUR INFRASTRUCTURE. FIBER-OPTIC COMMUNICATIONS ARE ONE OF THE MANY SERENDIPITOUS TECHNOLOGICAL BREAKTHROUGHS WHICH BROUGHT TOGETHER THE INTERNET AND ALL ITS BENEFITS. AS THE DEMAND FOR BANDWIDTH INCREASES, SO WILL THE DEMAND FOR PHOTONICS IN THE SYSTEM. WE ALL PLAY A CRITICAL ROLE IN THIS PHOTONICS EVOLUTION THROUGH FACILITATING THE TRANSFER OF INFORMATION AMONG THE COMMUNITIES AND PROVIDING THE STIMULUS THROUGH WHICH PEOPLE CAN MEET AND SHARE IDEAS AND CONCEPTS. OPTICS AND PHOTONICS: ESSENTIAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE WORLD

Biography

Over the past 40 years, I have worked for well-known American organizations such as world recognized institutions UC Berkeley University, Stanford University and ProQuest among others in Silicon Valley and the San Francisco bay area. I have diverse background in both academics and industries. As an e-book specialist and content editor have worked on a wide variety of e-books for well-known international universities, including Harvard, Princeton, Oxford, Cambridge, Stanford, Yale, MIT, and UC Berkeley universities among others educational institutions, and large publishers including Penguin Random House, Elsevier, McGraw-Hill, Wiley and Oxford University Press, As a keynote speaker, I have successfully delivered 45 conferences including 7 talks, presentations at Stanford University and continue sharing my knowledge and experience to help people around the world. Earnedachievement and recognition awards, prizes and scholarship

Speaker
S. Ali Barzanian / Stanford University

Abstract

The hydrophilic pendant type polymer bound (Co3+ and Ru2+) complexes conjugates were synthesized and characterized by spectro-chemical analysis. The key features of these complexes are: they are highly stable, redox active and show quasi-reversibility in the cyclic voltammetry response. The antimicrobial susceptibility of few bacterial and fungi strains were determined by the zone of inhibition method. The cell proliferation and mode of cell death induced by these polymer-metal complexes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells were determined using MTT assay and AO/EB assay. Scheme 1. Schematic synthetic representation of Co-BPEI-Ru.

Biography

Dr.Arunachalam Sankaralingam, Retired Professor of Chemistry of Bharathidasan University, resides presently at Dohi Etopia-II, 4A/310, Panchayat 3rd Link Road, Chennai-600096, India.He did his Ph.D. at University of Madras, India, had Postdoc from university of Victoria, Canada(during this period he has visited many universities in USA). Fifteen students have got Ph.D. under his guidance. He has published more than 80 papers, attended several conferences and present papers. He has operated several research projects funded by UGC, CSIR, DST of India. He had been in Japan and Germany as a visiting scientist, in Spain as a Visiting

Speaker
Arunachalam Sankaralingam / Bharathidsan University

Abstract

The relationship between isothermal, isobaric ensemble, total energy, and its evolution in time under low and high temperature and pressure have been investigating using Molecular Dynamics and the Dl_Poly_4 software (RAVEN supercomputer, Wales Cardiff University). In this work we used extended temperature and pressure in the range of 300-3000K and 0-200GPa respectively for ZnO wurtzite phase. Our data comfirm the validity of the interatomic potential under ambient conditions, which is closed the some available work, due to no more studies under previous ranges. We found an homogeneous of our results of extended conditions of temperature and pressures, with the ambient conditions, that confirm the validity of the potential and therefore the agreement of our work. This data permit to know the behavior of ZnO wurtzite phase and in other work the phase transitions values in each isobaric and isothermal ensemble, also these results have great importance in technology and nanotechnology especially in the field of medicine, pharmaceutics and geophysics. However these results are only a simulation predictions which needs an experimental confirmation in future.

Biography

Yahia CHERGUI has completed his PhD from Badji Mokhtar University in Annaba, Algeria. He is a lecturer in Boumerdes University since 2012. He has published more than 7 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a referee with condensed matter journal (IOP) and Energy journal (Elsevier).He passed 6 months in Cardiff University and Queen University for summer school.

Speaker
yahia chergui / university of Boumerdes,Algeria

Abstract

The lecture will cover firstly a general definition of Friction welding methods such as Linear, Rotational and Orbital Friction welding as well as Friction Stir Welding/Processing. Then, it will focus on the different simulation models used for Friction Welding methods and will discuss why the simulation of Friction Stir Welding is very complicated. In the simulation models the strain, temperature distribution, material flow patterns and etc. will be investigated. The dissimilar welding (simulation and experiment) will be the next topic. Finally, the simulation of microstructural evolution over the solid state welding methods will be discussed due to its high demand in the literature and the researchers are very interested in learning these models.

Biography

Speaker
Parviz Asadi / Imam Khomeini International University

Abstract

The magnificent invention of Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) by Grätzel in 1991 brought a breakthrough for achieving low-cost high-efficiency solar cells. Along with simple and facile fabrication process, it can be produced from abundant earth materials as well. The basic structure of DSSC is a photoanode prepared by coating of a semiconductor oxide (e.g.TiO2) on a transparent conducting oxide substrate, a dye (sensitizer) as an absorber (e.g. AK-01) [1], counter electrode (e.g. Pt) and charge neutralizer (e.g. Iodide/triiodide redox shuttle). The DSSC differs in working principle than conventional semiconductor (e.g.; Si) solar cell. In semiconductor solar cell, the charge carrier is generated at the p-n junction and carried out to the external circuit by the semiconductor itself upon illumination at the same time. Meanwhile, the dye has to play very important roles in DSSC operational principle. Unlike in DSSC, the dye adsorbed on TiO2 is exclusively responsible for sunlight absorption, exciton generation and injection of charge carrier to TiO2 by charge separation and thus dye becomes oxidised. Ultrafast electron injection [10-12 to 10-15 second scale] and restoring of the dye to original sate [10-6 to 10-9 second scale] require 0.2 eV of driving force to ensure cell remain functional. Most of the dyes used in DSSC are limited to relatively narrow absorption bands in solar radiation such as either high (UV-Vis) or low energy (IR) region whether it’s an organic or metal-based sensitizer restricting short circuit current density (JSC) of DSSC which is an important parameter for measuring power conversion efficiency (PCE) of solar cell. Unfortunately, there is no single sensitizer that can harvest sunlight from UV-NIR region of solar spectrum to exhibit higher JSC. As a result, the concept of mixing two or more different sensitizers (co-sensitization) those have absorption capabilities in different region of solar spectrum have been proposed. In this concept, each dye in mixed sensitizer helps to realize or compensate the shortcoming of panchromatic absorption for its counterpart by a synergetic effect. It has also been observed that the PCE of the co-sensitization system is higher than that of individual dye upon choosing the proper single dye. These attributes go to higher JSC of the mixed system compared to their identical value since the short circuit voltages (VOC) have not affected so much. The VOC values of the mixed system maintained by suppressing further recombination as well. So the incremental values of PCE resulted from broadening absorption spectrum obviously across the UV to NIR region [2]. The positive impacts of co-sensitization give an alternative means of achieving higher PCE of DSSC with lower cost for commercial production by synthesizing suitable co-dyes

Biography

Dr. Md. Akhtaruzzaman is an Assoc. Professor at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) of The National University of Malaysia (@ Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia), where he is leading the Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Solar Cells Unit at Solar Photovoltaics group. After received his BSc (Bachelor of Science) in 1996 and MSc (Master of Science) in 1998 in Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering from The University of Dhaka, he has been awarded the Japanese Government’s Monbukagakusho Scholarship and joined at the Institute for Molecular Science (IMS) in Okazaki, Japan where he obtained his PhD in March 2003 and studied on the design and synthesis of new organic heterocyclic compounds for EL device application. Thereafter, he worked in Japan for 12 years (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Fujifilm Fine Chemicals Co. Ltd., and Tohoku University), King Saud University in Saudi Arabia and University of Malaya (UM) in Malaysia. He has also been awarded one of the most prestigious fellowships of JSPS (Japan Society for the Promotion Science) in 2007-2009 at the Dept. of Electronics and Applied Physics of Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan. His areas of expertise on the rational design of organic/inorganic semiconductors, Nano-materials for various applications, including Dye-sensitized Solar cells (DSSCs), Perovskite thin film solar cell, Graphene /Quatum dots-based Hybrid solar cells , Bulk-heterojunction Solar cells (BHJs), Light-Emitting Organic Field-effect Transistors (LE- OFETs), Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFTs), Flexible Memory Devices, Nano- electronics and Electroluminescence devices, and published over 90 papers, reviews in peer- reviewed journals, and patents, and book chapters. He has also been serving as the project- leader as well as co-researcher of many governments (Malaysia) and international (Saudi National Grant, Qatar Foundation, etc.) funded projects.

Speaker
Md. Akhtaruzzaman / Universiti Kebangsaan ,Malaysia

Abstract

Recently great attention was paid to the localized optical modes in photonic crystals, in particular, in photonic liquid crystals due to their efficient application in the linear and nonlinear optics [1,2] and, especially, in achieving of a low threshold distributed feedback (DFB)lasing [3]. Here the properties of localized optical modes in spiral media are described. One of the most studied media of this kind are the cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs). A brief survey of the recent experimental and theoretical results related to the localized optical modes, and particularly, to low threshold distributed feedback (DFB) lasing in CLCs are presented. Also, new original theoretical results on the localized optical modes in CLCs, viz. edge modes (EMs) and defect modes (DMs), are given. An analytical approach to the theory of the EM and DM optics in CLC is developed. The dispersion equations determining connection of the EM and DM frequencies with the CLC layer parameters and other parameters of the defect structure (DMS) are obtained and solved in some limiting cases. The DMS with birefringent, absorbing and amplifying defect layers in a perfect CLC structure are studied. It is shown that the defect layer birefringence reduces the DM lifetime in comparison with the case of DM at an isotropic defect layer and as a result enlarges the lasing threshold. The effects of anomalously strong light absorption and lowering of the lasing threshold at the EM and DM frequencies are discussed. It is shown that adjusting of the lasing frequency to the localized mode frequency results in a significant lowering of the lasing threshold. The case of CLC layers with an anisotropic local absorption is analyzed and, in particular, shown that due to the Borrmann effect the EM life-times for the EM frequencies at the opposite stop-bands edges may be significantly different and so the lasing thresholds at the opposite stop-bands edges are essentially different also. The experimentally observed enhancement of some optical effects in photonic liquid crystals at the EM and DM frequencies (lowering of the lasing threshold, abnormally strong absorption etc.) are in good agreement with the presented theory [3]. It is shown how the experimental results on a conical lasing [4] (non-collinear lasing geometry) can be analytically described in the frame work of the two-wave dynamical diffraction theory [5]. It is emphasized that the presented for localized modes in CLC results are of a general nature and are qualitatively applicable for the localized modes in conventional photonic crystals.

Biography

Belyakov Vladimir Alekseevich started his research career in 1964 after graduation from Moscow Engineering Institute in 1961. He was a postgraduate student in I.V. Kurchatov Atomic Energy Institute during 1961–1964. He received the Candidate of Science degree in Theoretical Physics in 1965 and the Doctor of Science in 1974. He became professor in 1980. He headed the laboratory in All-Union Physics-Technical and Radio – Technical Institute (Moscow) during 1964–1982, and in Surface and Vacuum Research Centre (Moscow) during 1982–1995. Since 1982 he has been a part-time Professor in Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology, and since 1995 he has been a Senior Researcher in L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics. During his carrier he was a short term Visiting Professor of some Universities – Leuven (Belgium), Tokyo (Japan), Paris Sud (France), Glasgow Strathclyde (Scotland) etc. His research interests range from the theory of solid state nuclear physics to the interaction of radiation with matter, in particular, the optical properties of complex structured periodic media, e.g. the optics of liquid crystals. He has authored and co-authored the monographs: Optics of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals (1982), Optics of Chiral Liquid Crystals (1989); Diffraction Optics of Complex Structured Periodic Media (1988, 1992). He has memberships of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences, the Russian Academy of Metrology, and the International Liquid Crystal Society.

Speaker
V.A. Belyakov / Institute for Theoretical Physics , Russia

Abstract

The synthesis of monodispersed colloidal Poly(styrene-methyl-methacrylate-acrylic acid) (P(St-MMA-AA)) colloidal spheres in a two-pot synthetic procedure was successfully carried out via emulsion polymerization. DSC analysis showed that the glassy and rigid nature of the synthesized terpolymer latex would be maintained as far as it is applied within a temperature of 110 0C. Core shell morphology of colloidal latex particles was revealed by TEM analysis. The as-synthesized colloidal latex spheres were used in the fabrication of monochromatic and colour tunable photonic crystal films via evaporative induced self-assembly approach. Visual analysis showed that the photonic crystal films assembled using 212 nm and 220 nm sized colloidal particles displayed green and grey fascinating colours that did not change with viewing angles (monochromatic colours), while the films assembled using 302 nm and 370 nm sized colloidal particles displayed colours that changed with viewing angles. SEM/AFM analyses revealed that the colloidal microspheres readily arranged themselves into a regular hexagonal pattern with multi-facet monolayer, after the completion of self-assembly process. The study shows that photonic crystals with monochromatic and colour tunable properties can be obtained by controlling the average particle diameter of colloidal of P(St-MMA-AA) colloidal particles. Keyword: Monodispersed, monochromatic, viewing angle, poly(styrene-methyl-methacrylate-acrylic acid), photonic crystals

Biography

Dr. Ifijen Ikhazuagbe Ifijen has completed his PhD in Polymer chemistry in the University of Benin, Benin City and under the supervision of Prof. Esther. U. Ikhuoia. He is currently the head of her research team in the University of Benin, Nigeria. He undergone a short term research program under the guidiance of Dr. Saju at CSIR-National Institute for interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), India He has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a Research officer in Rubber Research Institute of Nigeria. His research interest is in nano-materials, polymers and their associated model compounds, polymer-based photonic materials and sensors, triggered/controlled drug delivery, novel micro and nanoparticle synthesis and responsive polymers.

Speaker
Ikhazuagbe Ifijen / University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria

Abstract

The situation and tendencies of organic nano-photovoltaics will be reviewed, starting from the underlying physics up to the current achievements and perspectives of commercialization. The noticeable advances in the efficiency of the organic PV took place recently. However, the first commercialization attempts failed because of the poor business strategy. Nowadays several institutions are competing in the field, exploring physical and engineering solutions. The prototype devices were already announced. Nevertheless, the commercial success will depend also on their popularity among end-users, and the commercial management. Microscopic charge transport is of primary importance in organic material and device engineering, as it determines macroscopic material parameters, conditioning device efficiency. Due to the hoping nature carrier mobility is one of the main factors limiting charge transport in disordered organic materials. Thus, understanding of the fundamental transport properties is a must for the device engineering. We will demonstrate that in materials and structures promising for organic and hybrid photovoltaics carrier transport is influenced in a complex way by the light-, electric field- and thermally- stimulated mobility and trapping, depending on the excitation. These complicated phenomena can be discriminated by sophisticated analysis and complementary experimental methods. To correctly address these issues, distribution of the density of transport states has to be taken into account. We will also demonstrate that device degradation is closely related to modification of the microscopic charge transport.

Biography

Dr. Habil. Vaidotas KAŽUKAUSKAS is a Professor at the Faculty of Physics of Vilnius University, Lithuania. He was awarded Dr. Habil. degree in 1999. The topics of his research work are carrier transport, generation, recombination and trapping phenomena in advanced materials and structures for (opto-)electronic and photovoltaic applications. Prof. V. Kažukauskas is/was involved as a team leader into the six large-scale international projects and other numerous projects. He was awarded the National Science Award of Lithuanian Republic, the National Science Award for the Distinguished Scientist, the Science Award of the Rector of Vilnius University and others. V. Kažukauskas has more than 380 publications, had delivered more than 60 invited lectures at the international conferences, and authored three textbooks.

Speaker
Vaidotas Kažukauskas / Vilnius University,Vilnius, Lithuania

Abstract

Nowadays, energy-saving and increasing the efficiency of power transmission lines, electrical machines and transformers are important as much as diversity and renewability of energy resources. The existing worldwide power transmission lines are sufficient for 1GW power transmission, which meets the current need of the World. However, considering the increasing power need it would be impossible to transmit dozens of GW power using the existing transmission lines due to the current carrying limitation of the metals used in transmission lines. Hence, it is necessary to develop new materials for power transmission lines. Although superconductors are a superior choice in terms of energy efficiency, it has disadvantages such as high production and operation costs in addition to critical temperature, current and field limitations. The production stages of superconductor wires are performed by using special devices and expensive techniques. Moreover, cooling them down to cryogenic temperatures increases the operating costs. Thus, superconductors are not used in power transmission except a few test-based applications in the World. The studies on energy- efficient materials, which can be alternative to superconductors and normal conductors, especially for applications of daily life are continued due to these disadvantages. It is known that new generation electrical materials on which the studies heavily performed in recent years have demonstrated close or better performances than superconductors in certain aspects even though they are not superconductors. One potential approach for decreasing copper’s electrical resistivity is the incorporation of carbon nanotubes into copper. This nano-composite material is calledUltraConductive copper. Carbon nanotubes conduct electricity differently than metals: optimizing the electrical conductivity of a copper/nanocarbon composite requires careful engineering on a nano-scale. Research done by James Maxwell et all in USA Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for this purpose shown that, because carbon nanotubes (CNT) are ballistic conductors, wires produced from CNT-Cu composite structures have higher conductivity and much better current carrying capacities than copper. (http://www.lanl.gov/science/NSS/issue2_2011/story5full.shtml). CNT contained composite wires can be used for many applications such as transmission lines due to Improvement of the conductivity of CNT-containing composite wires [Lekawa-Raus et al. 2012], reducing the weight by increasing the mechanical strength [Koziol et al.2007] and less skin effect [Banerjee 2008], [Antonini et al. 2011]. Incorporation of carbon nanostructures in metals is desirable to combine the strongly bonded electrons in the metal and the free electrons in carbon nanostructures that give rise to high ampacity and high conductivity, respectively. The latest one of these materials are metal-nanocarbon composites also called “covetic”. Electrical and thermal conductance, mechanical strength, oxidation and corrosion resistances, current carrying capacities of these new materials are enhanced considerably compared to conventional pure materials such as Cu, Al which are commonly used in the electrical and electronics industry. Covetic wires have close or superior performances than superconductors in almost every aspects excluding the zero-resistance property of superconductors for DC currents. Nanoscale carbon increases the melting temperature of copper and aluminum covetics. By adding carbon nanostructures in metals, it is possible; i. to get a higher electrical conductivity than the best electrical grade metals, ii. It is also possible to add unusually high amounts of nanocarbon to metals (above 6% for copper, well beyond thermodynamic stability limits reported in conventional phase diagrams for copper), iii. A small addition of carbon nanostructures is sufficient to improve the physical, mechanical, and tribological properties of the Metal/CNT-graphene composites and iv. Excessive reinforcement of CNTs degrades the properties especially, thermal conductivity and ductility of the composites through CNTs agglomeration, breakage and delamination and the increase of process related defects.

Biography

Mehmet Ertugrul received the B.Sc. degree from the Department of Physics, Atatürk University, Erzurum, Turkey, in 1986, and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from Atatürk University, in 1990 and 1994, respectively. From 1994 to 1996, 1996 to 2001, and 2001 to 2002, he was an Assistant Professor, an Associate Professor, and a Full Professor with the Department of Physics, Atatürk University, respectively, where he has been a Full Professor with the Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, since 2003. He was a visitor scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA for several periods and several years. He has authored or co-authored over 166 papers published in international SCI journals. His current research interests include superconducting and semiconducting devices with applications, nanofabrication and nanoelectronics, ultraconductors, metamaterials, wearable antennas, gas and biomedical sensors. He has several national and international awards. Dr. Ertugrul was a recipient of the Award by The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK), the Turkish Academy of Sciences (TUBA) and Ataturk University. He has two of NATO-C grant

Speaker
Mehmet Ertugrul / Ataturk University, Turkey

Abstract

Foam-filled metal structures have a combination of effective properties, such as, high strength, good energy absorption capacity, high specific stiffness, etc. All these characteristics make it ideal for low-weight configurations. They are also popular as construction materials as well as for engineered structures. With advances in mechanical engineering, development of high-performance foam-filled structures and components has become strongly connected to the introduction of new materials. Foam-filled structures have brought in a unique opportunity for innovations and adaptations in mechanical engineering applications in a cost-effective manner. Most of the commercially viable metal foams are contain aluminium, nickel, magnesium, zinc, bronze, lead, titanium, steel, copper and even gold as their base material. Application of foam-filled structures have been steadily on the rise due to benefits, such as, weight reduction, improved stiffness, energy dissipation, mechanical damping and vibration suppression etc., Current applications are largely observed in the domains of automobile and aeroplane manufacture, building structures, etc. The objective of the use of foam-filled structures in vehicles is to increase sound damping and to reduce the weight of a vehicle and to increase energy absorption in case of crashes, thereby enhancing crashworthiness.

Biography

Dr. Dipen Kumar Rajak doctorate in Material and Design Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology (ISM) Dhanbad-India at the age of 27 Year. Dr. Rajak is currently working as Assistant Professor of Department of Mechanical Engineering at Sandip University Nashik.The academic achievements are manifested in his original research contributions through over 30 papers published in refereed international journals, 02-Patent, 01-book chapter, and 01-book. These contributions are well reckoned as shown through numerous citations to his papers. He has received numerous awards and associated with foreign Universities and National & International societies, IEI, IIM, ISTE, IETI, DAAAM, IAAM, ISAET along with that he is an editorial board member and reviewer of refereed international journals. Also, serving as a Nashik-Branch President for International Engineering and Technology Institute, Hong Kong, and the recent work consists of development of aluminium foams for different applications where low density and high specific energy absorption is required in automobile, aerospace and thermal management sectors.

Speaker
Dipen Kumar Rajak / Sandip University Nashik

Abstract

Influence of neutron irradiation on reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel degradation are examined with reference to the possible reasons of the substantial experimental data scatter and furthermore – nonstandard (non-monotonous) and oscillatory embrittlement behavior. In our glance this phenomenon may be explained by presence of the wavelike recovering component in the embrittlement kinetics. We suppose that the main factor affecting steel anomalous embrittlement is fast neutron intensity (dose rate or flux), flux effect manifestation depends on state-of-the-art fluence level. At low fluencies radiation degradation has to exceed normative value, then approaches to normative meaning and finally became sub normative. Data on radiation damage change including through the ex-service RPVs taking into account chemical factor, fast neutron fluence and neutron flux were obtained and analyzed. In our opinion controversy in the estimation on neutron flux on radiation degradation impact may be explained by presence of the wavelike component in the embrittlement kinetics. Therefore flux effect manifestation depends on fluence level. At low fluencies radiation degradation has to exceed normative value, then approaches to normative meaning and finally became sub normative. As a result of dose rate effect manifestation peripheral RPV’s zones in some range of fluencies have to be damaged to a large extent than situated closely to core. Moreover as a hypothesis we suppose that at some stages of irradiation damaged metal have to be partially restored by irradiation i.e. neutron bombardment. Nascent during irradiation nanostructure undergo occurring once or periodically transformation in a direction both degradation and recovery of the initial properties. According to our hypothesis at some stage(s) of metal structure degradation neutron bombardment became recovering factor. Self-recovering section of RPV steel radiation embrittlement kinetics is an indication of material nanostructure self-organizing and intelligent behavior.

Biography

Date of birth: September 11, 1946. Education: Moscow Power Engineering Institute. Degree(s) or Diploma(s) obtained: Master’s Degree in Material Science – 1970, Ph.D. – 1974, D.Sc. -2005. Membership of professional bodies: member of Scientific Council of RAS on Radiation Damage Physics of Solids. Years within the firm: since 1974. Key qualification: responsible executor in Radiation Damage Physics of Solids. Professional experience record: since 1974 till now, Moscow, National Research Centre "Kurchatov Institute”, Department: Reactor Materials and Technologies Institute.

Speaker
Evgenii Krasikov / Kurchatov Institute , Russian federation

Plenary Talks

Abstract

Nowadays, energy-saving and increasing the efficiency of power transmission lines, electrical machines and transformers are important as much as diversity and renewability of energy resources. The existing worldwide power transmission lines are sufficient for 1GW power transmission, which meets the current need of the World. However, considering the increasing power need it would be impossible to transmit dozens of GW power using the existing transmission lines due to the current carrying limitation of the metals used in transmission lines. Hence, it is necessary to develop new materials for power transmission lines. Although superconductors are a superior choice in terms of energy efficiency, it has disadvantages such as high production and operation costs in addition to critical temperature, current and field limitations. The production stages of superconductor wires are performed by using special devices and expensive techniques. Moreover, cooling them down to cryogenic temperatures increases the operating costs. Thus, superconductors are not used in power transmission except a few test-based applications in the World. The studies on energy- efficient materials, which can be alternative to superconductors and normal conductors, especially for applications of daily life are continued due to these disadvantages. It is known that new generation electrical materials on which the studies heavily performed in recent years have demonstrated close or better performances than superconductors in certain aspects even though they are not superconductors. One potential approach for decreasing copper’s electrical resistivity is the incorporation of carbon nanotubes into copper. This nano-composite material is calledUltraConductive copper. Carbon nanotubes conduct electricity differently than metals: optimizing the electrical conductivity of a copper/nanocarbon composite requires careful engineering on a nano-scale. Research done by James Maxwell et all in USA Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for this purpose shown that, because carbon nanotubes (CNT) are ballistic conductors, wires produced from CNT-Cu composite structures have higher conductivity and much better current carrying capacities than copper. (http://www.lanl.gov/science/NSS/issue2_2011/story5full.shtml). CNT contained composite wires can be used for many applications such as transmission lines due to Improvement of the conductivity of CNT-containing composite wires [Lekawa-Raus et al. 2012], reducing the weight by increasing the mechanical strength [Koziol et al.2007] and less skin effect [Banerjee 2008], [Antonini et al. 2011]. Incorporation of carbon nanostructures in metals is desirable to combine the strongly bonded electrons in the metal and the free electrons in carbon nanostructures that give rise to high ampacity and high conductivity, respectively. The latest one of these materials are metal-nanocarbon composites also called “covetic”. Electrical and thermal conductance, mechanical strength, oxidation and corrosion resistances, current carrying capacities of these new materials are enhanced considerably compared to conventional pure materials such as Cu, Al which are commonly used in the electrical and electronics industry. Covetic wires have close or superior performances than superconductors in almost every aspects excluding the zero-resistance property of superconductors for DC currents. Nanoscale carbon increases the melting temperature of copper and aluminum covetics. By adding carbon nanostructures in metals, it is possible; i. to get a higher electrical conductivity than the best electrical grade metals, ii. It is also possible to add unusually high amounts of nanocarbon to metals (above 6% for copper, well beyond thermodynamic stability limits reported in conventional phase diagrams for copper), iii. A small addition of carbon nanostructures is sufficient to improve the physical, mechanical, and tribological properties of the Metal/CNT-graphene composites and iv. Excessive reinforcement of CNTs degrades the properties especially, thermal conductivity and ductility of the composites through CNTs agglomeration, breakage and delamination and the increase of process related defects.

Biography

Mehmet Ertugrul received the B.Sc. degree from the Department of Physics, Atatürk University, Erzurum, Turkey, in 1986, and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from Atatürk University, in 1990 and 1994, respectively. From 1994 to 1996, 1996 to 2001, and 2001 to 2002, he was an Assistant Professor, an Associate Professor, and a Full Professor with the Department of Physics, Atatürk University, respectively, where he has been a Full Professor with the Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, since 2003. He was a visitor scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA for several periods and several years. He has authored or co-authored over 166 papers published in international SCI journals. His current research interests include superconducting and semiconducting devices with applications, nanofabrication and nanoelectronics, ultraconductors, metamaterials, wearable antennas, gas and biomedical sensors. He has several national and international awards. Dr. Ertugrul was a recipient of the Award by The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK), the Turkish Academy of Sciences (TUBA) and Ataturk University. He has two of NATO-C grant.

Speaker
Mehmet Ertugrul / Ataturk University, Turkey

Abstract

The significance of the work: We present a new approach for the texture classification based on multifractal descriptor. The presented approach tackles the problems of texture characterization and provides interesting results in order to identify defects in textures. The originality of the present work can be found in the proposed multiresolution quantities that improve the performance of multifractal spectrum based on wavelet leaders. These quantities will be called: Maximum coefficients of Discrete Wavelet Transform (DmaxWT) for 2D multifractal analysis. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated using both synthetic and experimental data.The experiments showed that our texture descriptor gives good performsin termsof classification accuracy on several texture datasets. Hybrid time-frequency is also used for perception of materials with detection of abrupt changes. The problem that is being addressed: We show explicitly the practical steps of numerical calculation of the multifractal spectrum. From fractal spectrum, selected discriminative features are applied to texture classification. The performance of the estimation procedure (bias and variance) has been analyzed by generating a large number of realizations of synthetic processes.The application of our method in texture classification context of early diagnosis of skin cancer shows that it is possible to discriminate between healthy tissue and pathologic tissue. Moreover, in the context of food quality, milkclassification based on the multifractal descriptorindicates that our contribution enables the effective discrimination of different texture:the experiment consists of 30 classes of non-traditional textures, composed of 25 samples of high resolution images in each class and the same for the low resolution images. We show how the DmaxWT multifractal analysis is pertinent for texture classification.Indeed, we present a new analysis method for discriminating milk heat treatment effects. In texture classification context, multifractal features are estimated from each image and used in the classification for characterization within a standard k-NN (k-nearest neighbor) classification approach.We then conduct a comparative evaluation with state-of-the-art recognition methods including HLSR method, VG-fractal method and VZ-joint method. The experimental results on several texture datasets verified the accuracy and efficiency of the classification based on the multifractal descriptor.Finaly we state a new descriptor which uses a hybrid representation time-frequency and detection of abrupt changes.

Biography

Smain Femmam is Director of research at the University of Haute-Alsace France and responsible of the Research team on Signals & Safety Systems of Polytechnic Engineer School Sceaux France. He received the MS and Ph.D. degrees in Signal Processing and is promoted to a rank of senior director of research (HDR). After that, he joined the CMU Carnegie Mellon University & West Virginia University as Postdoc Fellow and Distinguished Visiting Professor. His main research area is signal processing, safety systems, communication and embedded systems. He has a strong interest in perception and characterization of signals, optimal filtering, spectral analysis, wavelets and perception haptics. Dr. Femmam is a senior member of IEEE, SEE and GDR ISIS. Member of IEEE C.A. committee France section. Board of Director of the Institute for Engineering and Technology Innovations in the World. He has guided numerous thesis projects, including some doctoral theses. He is active reviewer for several scientific academic journals and committee member of international conferences. He is the (Academic, Chief) Editor-in-Chief, Editor, Editorial Board, Guest Editor & Advisory Board members of more than 20 International Journals. He has authored and co authored more than 90 papers, four Chapters, one edited Book, seven Books published by Wiley & Elsevier.

Speaker
Pr. S. Femmam / University of Haute-Alsace,France

Sessions:

Abstract

AS OPTICS AND PHOTONICS EVOLVE, OPPORTUNITIES WILL CONTINUE TO EXPAND AND WILL BE ENDLESS. A NEW REPORT FROM THE NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL DEFINES RESEARCH PRIORITIES AND CHALLENGES THAT WOULD FILL GAPS IN OPTICS AND PHOTONICS, TECHNOLOGIES THAT HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO ADVANCE THE ECONOMY OF THE UNITED STATES AND PROVIDE VISIONARY DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS. AS HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS OF DOLLAR POUR INTO ROCHESTER TO ESTABLISH THE NATION'S FIRST PHOTONICS HUB, "THE FUTURE OF PHOTONICS." WHEN PHOTONICS HUB IS FINISHED AND OPERATIONAL, THE FUTURE OF PHOTONICS IS LIMITLESS. PHOTONICS HAS ITS ROLE IN THE CONTINUING DEVELOPMENT OF OUR INFRASTRUCTURE. FIBER-OPTIC COMMUNICATIONS ARE ONE OF THE MANY SERENDIPITOUS TECHNOLOGICAL BREAKTHROUGHS WHICH BROUGHT TOGETHER THE INTERNET AND ALL ITS BENEFITS. AS THE DEMAND FOR BANDWIDTH INCREASES, SO WILL THE DEMAND FOR PHOTONICS IN THE SYSTEM. WE ALL PLAY A CRITICAL ROLE IN THIS PHOTONICS EVOLUTION THROUGH FACILITATING THE TRANSFER OF INFORMATION AMONG THE COMMUNITIES AND PROVIDING THE STIMULUS THROUGH WHICH PEOPLE CAN MEET AND SHARE IDEAS AND CONCEPTS. OPTICS AND PHOTONICS: ESSENTIAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE WORLD

Biography

Over the past 40 years, I have worked for well-known American organizations such as world recognized institutions UC Berkeley University, Stanford University and ProQuest among others in Silicon Valley and the San Francisco bay area. I have diverse background in both academics and industries. As an e-book specialist and content editor have worked on a wide variety of e-books for well-known international universities, including Harvard, Princeton, Oxford, Cambridge, Stanford, Yale, MIT, and UC Berkeley universities among others educational institutions, and large publishers including Penguin Random House, Elsevier, McGraw-Hill, Wiley and Oxford University Press, As a keynote speaker, I have successfully delivered 45 conferences including 7 talks, presentations at Stanford University and continue sharing my knowledge and experience to help people around the world. Earnedachievement and recognition awards, prizes and scholarship

Speaker
S. Ali Barzanian / Stanford University
USA

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