Scientific Program

Sessions:

Scientific Sessions

Abstract

Bio-inspired robotics is about learning concepts from nature and applying them to the design of real-world systems (or) mechanism that is simpler and more effective than the system observed in nature. Similarly, Bio-mimetics is about developing robot, whose shape / internal structure / sensing & actuating system mimics that of animals / birds / insects, thereby radically improving the capabilities robots in term locomotion, sensing, actuation, energy consumption, etc. Bio-inspired / Bio-mimetic Robots synergies various disciplines including: Mechanical, Electronics, Control engineering, Neuroscience (AI), Biology. This new breed of robots will be substantially more compliant and reliable than current robots, by taking advantage of new developments in materials, fabrication technologies, sensors and actuators. Applications of this kind of robots are numerous; not limited to: reconnaissance, medical, agriculture, military, etc.

Biography

Dr.P.V.Manivannan received his Ph.D in Control System for SI Engines from IIT Madras, India. Currently, he is an Assistant Professor at Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, India. He has delivered more than fifty guest lecture / key note addresses in faculty development programmes, conferences and seminars. He visited the University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; University of Nebraska, Lincoln, USA and University of Kaiserslautern, Germany as a visiting faculty and also taught summer term course “Mechatronic Systems”. He is also a recipient of prestigious DAAD fellowship and ERASMUS MUNDUS Teaching fellowship. His teaching / research interests includes: Mechatronics, Robotics, Automotive Control Systems, Embedded System Design, Sensor Network. He has undertaken and successfully completed many projects for industries and government funding agencies.

Speaker
Manivannan P V IIT Madras, India

Abstract

This paper summarizes the current position of 3D metal printing/additive manufacturing (henceforth called 3D metal printing) from an industrial perspective. The new possibilities to design the part differently simply because the new shape can be produced and which provides benefits with respect to improved material utilization degree, reduced weight, size etc. are addressed in this paper. Different types of generative design concepts such as form synthesis, topology optimization and lattice and surface optimization are exemplified. Low volume production by 3D metal printing is discussed. High volume production by 3D metal printing of manufacturing tools and dies is described. Tool & die production is an important phase in the development of new components/product models. This phase determines both the lead time (Time-ToProduction/-Market) and the size of the investments required to start the production. The lead time for the production of tools and dies for a new car body is currently about 12 months and needs to be reduced 40% by 2020. The lead time for injection molds for small and large series production must be reduced to 10 days and 4 weeks respectively. Lead time and cost-efficient metallic tools can be provided by 3D metal printing. This paper focuses on tools and dies for the manufacture of sheet metal & plastic components for the engineering, automotive and furniture industries. The paper includes Powder Bed Fusion (PBF). Digitalization through virtual tool & die design and optimization of the tool & die production combined with the PBF´s digital essence provides greater flexibility, better efficiency, tremendous speed, improved sustainability and increased global competitiveness. 3D metal printing is expected to result in several changes in the supplier chain and generate new business models. The present paper describes some of the changes 3D metal printing has led to and is expected to result in within the engineering and automotive industry in Europe during the coming years.

Biography

Nader Asnafi is a professor of mechanical engineering with extensive experience from various assignments in the industry in addition to his academic career. He has developed a range of new materials and, more recently, with the 3D-printing. He has a long industrial experience in leadership positions from the company Esselte Dymo, Sapa Technology, Volvo Cars and Uddeholm. He also worked as director of studies at LTU and Division Chief of Engineering at Blekinge Institute of Technology. He has been the appointed reviewer of several national Swedish R and D Programs and has been the chairman of the board of SWEREA IVF INDUSTRIAL MEMBERS ASSOCIATION from 2007 to2009. He is also the member of the board of WINGQUIST CENTER OF EXCELLENCE, a national center of excellence focusing on virtual product and production development mainly within the automotive industry and the Council of the Institution of Product and Production Development at CHALMERS UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, Sweden. He has organized several international conferences and seminars.

Abstract

Nanoparticles are cornerstones of nanotechnology which play a significant role in the present century, due to their enhanced size-dependant characteristics compared to larger particles of the same material. Recently copper and aluminium nanoparticles have gained a significant interest by the researchers because of their novel physical, thermal, electrical, catalytic properties, etc., and are widely used in various applications like automobiles, electronic devices, catalysis, rocket propellants, explosives, etc. Copper and aluminium nanoparticles are synthesized using various vapor phase reaction and liquid phase reaction methods viz., wire explosion, combustion flame, laser ablation, aerosol synthesis and wet chemical process. But, the synthesis of nanoparticles using advanced mechanical micro-machining method- micro-Electrical Discharge Machining (µ- EDM) has not been explored much. The present article reports a novel approach to synthesize copper and aluminium nanoparticles in the liquid media using a µ-EDM method. Nanoparticles are synthesized by controlling various operating parameters in micro-EDM such as voltage, current, frequency, duty cycle and pulse duration. To prevent the agglomeration and sedimentation of nanoparticles suitable stabilizers are used. The synthesized nanoparticles were examined using various diagnostic tools to evaluate their size, shape, crystal structure chemical nature. The mean size of the copper and aluminium nanoparticles are found to be about 6 nm and 10 nm with narrow size distribution and stable dispersion. The thermal conductivity and viscosity of synthesized nanoparticles has found to be enhanced with respect to pure DI water. The application suitability of synthesized colloidal nanoparticles for heat transfer is studied using a developed thermal management experimental setup. The paper also includes some glimpse of generation of nanoparticles using hybrid micromachining process-micro-Electro-Chemical Discharge Machining (µ-ECDM) and related results

Biography

Dr Somashekhar S Hiremath works as an Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, INDIA. He received the Doctoral Degree in 2004 from IIT Madras, Chennai. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals and 120 papers in national and international conferences. He has guided 7 Ph D; 4 MS (by research) and 30 M Tech thesis. His current research area includes mechatronic system design; micromachining; fluid power systems and modeling and simulation. He has been serving as Board of Studies Member and Editorial Board Member of many reputed institutions and journals.

Speaker
Somashekhar S. Hiremath Indian Institute of Technology Madras, India

Abstract

The smart composite materials and the advanced nano-composites are making revolutionary changes in the modern engineering. They have the outstanding mechanical properties and the ability to respond adaptively in a useful and efficient manner to changes in environmental conditions, as well as to certain changes in their own state, and therefore significantly increase the functionality and serviceability of structures. Advanced design and optimization of the smart composite structures and nano-composites is based on the adequate micromechanical modeling. Many commonly used mechanical models are based on certain approximations and simplifications, and as a result, they often lead to wrong values of the effective and local properties. Accurate calculation of these properties is essential for the refined analysis and optimal design. The major types of smart composite structures will be introduced and discussed in the presentation. The general theory of smart materials will be formulated, and, on the basis of this theory, the major types of the design and optimization of smart structures will be introduced. The mathematically rigorous micromechanical modeling of smart composite materials and thin-walled structures built of multiple small-size unit cells is based on the multi-scale asymptotic homogenization technique. The theoretical background of this approach will be introduced, and the presenter’s results in the developing the micromechanical models and their application to the analysis of the effective and local properties of practically important structures, including 3D grid-reinforced nano-composites; wafer- and grid-reinforced shells; sandwich shells with cellular cores of different geometrical configurations; and carbon nanotubes will be presented and discussed.

Biography

Dr. Alexander L. Kalamkarov is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada since 1993, and Director of Smart Materials Centre since 1995. He was awarded the PhD degree from the Moscow State University in 1979 and the Doctor of Sciences (Habilitation) from the Academy of Sciences of the USSR in 1990. His academic career spans over 38 years in Research and University teaching. He has taught in the Universities in USA, England, France, Australia, Japan, and visit ednumerous Universities and Research Institutes around the world. Research performed by Prof. Kalamkarov in mechanics of advanced composites and smart structures is internationally recognized. He has authored more than 350 research publications,including 140 refereed journal papers, 6 Research Monographs and 2 US patents. Prof.Kalamkarov is awarded the CANCAM Gold Medal for the outstanding contribution in the area of Applied Mechanics in 2011. He has served as a Vice-President of the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering (CSME) and is a Member of numerous prestigious International Editorial and Advisory boards in the area of composite materials and smart structures.

Speaker
Alex Kalamkarov Dalhousie University, Canada

Abstract

High consumption of electronic and electrical equipment (EEE), rapid technological advancements&upgrades of items such as mobile phones, computers, TVs, laptops, notebooks etc. are generating large volumes of electronic waste (e-waste) worldwide. E-waste is one of the fastest growing solid/hazardous waste streams in the world;the global generation of e-waste is expected to reach ~50 Mt in 2018. E-waste is a complex combination of valuable as well as potentially toxic and hazardous elements, and waste components such as refrigerants, batteries, CRTs, PCBs that require special treatment.We present a report on key challenges and issues facing current e-waste management practices. A critical assessment of e-waste, changing composition profile,collection procedures and regulatory measures was carried out to get a global perspective on e-waste management in developed, emerging and under developed/poor economies; the influence of socioeconomic factors including education standards and local realities etc. This study focusses on identifying key distinctions and similarities for e-waste management scenarios such as collection, recycling and material recovery; collection methods by region; informal sector collection and reuse, management and responses;regulation of e-waste;extended producer responsibility; transboundary hazardous waste and disposal;comparison of developed and developing economies recycling etc. This analysis is followed by recommendations on the roles for the informal and the formal sectors towards maximizing waste collection and for processing waste under formalized environmental management systems. Fundamental information on appropriate waste management and processing approaches will be presented towards maximizing material recovery, while minimizing the environment impact of waste processing and associated pollution.

Biography

Rita Khanna is currently working as an Associate Professor in the University of New South Wales, Australia. She is a senior researcher with a PhD in condensed matter physics with extensive research experience, both theoretical and experimental, in the fields of x-ray diffraction, theoretical modeling and atomistic computer simulations. Since 1997, Rita has brought her expertise to high temperature metallurgical processes and has developed a novel atomistic approach towards the fundamental understanding of basic reaction processes. She is a key member of UNSW super-computing fraternity and has published extensively.

Speaker
Rita Khanna The University of New South Wales, Australia

Abstract

This study evaluates the pitting susceptibility and cathodic activity for endogenous, nonmetallic inclusions in the high-strength API-X52 and 60 in near-neutral, chloride and bicarbonate solutions. The inclusions are characterized in relation to the steel making method, particularly to the compositional variation across the thickness of a pipeline steel slab. Using conventional potentiodynamic scans, the pitting potentials (along with the transpassivation's) are first systematically linked to the constituents of a matrix of test solutions. The local kinetics of corrosion are studied by Scanning Vibrating Electrode Technique (SVET). The local physical phenomena, including the different modes of localized attacks are studied by suitable microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. For comparison, the electrochemical findings are corroborated by testing synthesized Al2O3 and MnS inclusions, mechanically alloyed to pure iron.

Biography

Dr. Faysal Eliyan is a professor at the American University of Kuwait. He works at the mechanical engineering department and leads the oil and gas research group. He currently writes a book on enhancing the integrity of oil pipelines with environmentally-friendly inhibitors. He publishes in oil and gas materials and their testing methods. Formerly, he worked at the University of British Columbia and McMaster University in Canada. He is a member in ASME and NACE and other US and Canadian societies.

Speaker
Faysal Eliyan The University of British Columbia, Kuwait

Abstract

It is well known fact in our life to restore broken and damaged components which can be considered as obsolete to retain back to productive components. In order to do this restoration successfully a proposed theoretical approach has been suggested. This approach is theoretically validated through mathematical derivations leading to the estimation of life of a component. Based on the stress spectrum acting externally on the mechanical component and through information data of the material response under similar environmental conditions, all will lead to the calculation of service lifetimes. The latter has been denoted as being the lifetime based on fitness for performance approach. In order to avoid sudden catastrophic failure in the mechanical component, it would be very appropriate to set risk based monitoring criterion to fulfill trouble free lifetime. The paper has been extended to deal with the full scenario of the steps involved in the strategic maintenance procedure which can generally applied to any mechanical component. Case studies to reveal the distinguish importance of the procedure has been discussed. The first deals with repairs carried out in failure of one of the two shoulders of a vertical copper press, the second case is describing a gantry crane in terminal container, while the third one is for replacement a broken blade in marine screw propeller which encountered an accident leading to the loss of one of the three blades propeller. The third case presents the art of technology applied in engineering practice in a workshop. The importance of that application is that the propeller is fitted to a heavily loaded tug. One of the main conclusions within this paper is that the proposed strategic maintenance for recycling of damaged and failed components back to life can be confidentially applied with reliability and proven to be one of the best tools in retaining back old mechanical assets.

Biography

Speaker
Mustafa University of Alexandria, Egypt

Abstract

A nondestructive experimental technique for determination of structural flaws in beams based on analytical analysis is presented. The proposed method is capable of detecting the location of cracks and other possible structural flaws on a beam using the first two measured natural frequencies of a moveable mass on the beam at several locations along the beam. To verify the validity of the proposed method, vibration response of a cracked cantilever beam with a stationary roving mass is investigated. The beam is modeled as an Euler-Bernoulli beam with a rectangular cross section. The axial and transverse deformations of the cracked beam are coupled through a stiffness matrix determined using fracture mechanics principles. The developed model is used to determine analytical solutions for variation of natural frequencies and mode shapes of a cracked cantilever beam versus the position of the roving mass. The analysis indicates that the variation of the natural frequencies versus position of the roving mass can drastically change when the roving mass is close to the position of a flaw. Moreover, the effects of the location and depth of the crack, the location and the weight of the roving mass on the natural frequencies, and mode shapes of the beam are investigated. The analytical results show that the coupling between the axial and transverse vibrations for moderate values of crack depth and/or roving mass is weak. Increasing the crack depth, the mass and the rotary inertia increases the coupling effect.

Biography

Dr. Hamid R. Hamidzadeh is Professor and Head of the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering at Tennessee State University. Before joining TSU, he was Professor of Mechanical Engineering at South Dakota State University for many years. He was a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley and Purdue University. He received his Ph.D. in Applied Mechanics from Imperial College-University of London in 1978. Dr. Hamidzadeh is an active teacher and researcher in vibrations, dynamic systems, composite cylinders, and inflated thin-film structures. He has been principal investigator of many research projects and contracts, and has published numerous technical articles. He was actively involved in research projects with NASA Marshal Space Flight Center. He has served the ASME as a member of NSSC and as chair of different Committees at Region VII for many years. He has served as a member of ASME Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound. He has organized and chaired several ASME Symposia. He was chair of the 20th ASME Biennial Conference on Mechanical Vibration and Noise, and the General Co-Chair of the 2005 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers

Speaker
Hamid R. Hamidzadeh Tennessee State University, USA

Abstract

The majority of vibration equipment, such as vibrating screens, conveyors and tables applied in compacting molding masses are predominantly designed by accounting for only static loads resulting from the external forces (aggregate, molding masses). This work presents the results of a comparative analysis into an impactor of a hybrid vibrating screen and a vibrating table applied for compacting molding masses accounting for both the impact of the external forces and the mass of the machine itself. In addition, numerical simulations that were performed accounted for the loads varying in a dynamic manner with the frequency of 50 Hz. The analysis of the design of the hybrid screen needs to take into consideration one of the key elements, namely the impactor, and detailed numerical research is needed into its strength parameters due to its complex design and operating characteristics (considerable frequency of the variable load equal up to 50 Hz). Fig. 1 contains photographs of the vibrating screen comprising four impactors, which serves for exciting the sieve bed with the purpose of controlling the material screening process and the vibrating table. The conducted dynamic analysis involves the impact of the sieve bed on the impactor and accounts for the material that is applied and the effect of the gravitational force. The simulation of the applied load involved the control of a cyclic change of the rotation angle of the impactor in relation to its axis up to the maximum value of this angle 2.23o with a frequency of 50 Hz accounting for the additional impact of the sieve bed and including the screened material with a mass of around 150 kg. For the vibrating table, the simulation involved the control of the motion in the vertical direction with the displacement amplitude of 0.5 mm with a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The study demonstrated the considerable effect of the variation in the load on the value of the stresses in comparison to the shear loads

Biography

Dr. Grzegorz Robak graduated from Ph.D. study at Opole University of Technology (OUT). At present, he conducts research and holds the post of a lecturer at Faculty of Mechanical Engineering in Department of Mechanics and Machine Design. The specialties of the research include fatigue strength of materials and numerical simulations. He is an author and co-authors of numerous research works.

Speaker
Grzegorz Robak Opole University of Technology, Poland

Abstract

Vibration tests are widely used for determine the durability of mechanical components at service loading. Typical test involve acting of vibration on the test element, what results in inertia forces which loads the corresponding machine parts. The test is finished after predetermined time period and the tested part can be check for damage. The test time is predefined according to international standards or internal guidelines. Usually this are several hours of tests for each loading direction. Bearing in mind the cost savings of these tests, it is suggested to perform them in less time. The main goal is to obtain the same fatigue effect on tested material during speeded up test as in this with the standard time duration. This can be done using non-Gaussian loading with the kurtosis greater than 3. Of course while preparing the tests first approximation of the expected durability is asset. This is done computationally usually using CAD model of the tested part, FEM and fatigue analysis which take into account the non-Gaussian loading. Such models are also the basis for building a tools for calculation the fatigue life obtained under non-Gaussian loading to life under Gaussian loading. The smooth conversion of one fatigue life to the other is necessary for the shortening operation of the tests performed on test stand. In the paper complete procedure for preparing and performing the vibration tests by using non-Gaussian loading for obtaining the results in a shorter time is presented. Verification of the presented procedure is performed on a simple example.

Biography

Adam Niesłony has completed his PhD from Opole University of Technology, Poland and habilitation from Cracow University of Technology, Poland. He is the director of Technology Transfer Center at OUTech and head of Engineering Design Center at Science and Technology Park in Opole. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been supervised several PhD theses

Speaker
Adam Opole University of Technology, Poland

Abstract

The employment of alternative energy has increased massively over the last decade. Wind turbines (horizontal axis (HAWT) and vertical axis (VAWT)) are one of the best alternative approaches for production of electricity. The choice of aerofoil form of blade is one of the crucial and most important parameter of these wind turbine design. However, conducting experimentation, through wind tunnel testing, costs innumerable cash and time. Thus, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is an efficient and effective ways to study the aerodynamics over the wind turbine blades. The aero-mechanics performance of turbine relies on lift and drag forces that are suffering from Reynolds number and numerous angle of attack. The objective of this paper is to predict the complexities caused due to behavior of flow over rotors of wind turbine. A full scale HAWT simulation, having S809 aerofoil profile, is attempted here with help of moving mesh method. The length of blade is 43.2 meters and starts with a cylindrical shape at the root and then transitions to the aerofoils S809 towards body and tip. This design of blade is similar to GE 1.5XLE turbine in size. The turbulent wind flows at 12 m/s which are a typical rated wind speed found at Pune/Nagar area is simulated. This external flow results in rotation of blades in clockwise direction at -2.22 rad/s about the z-axis. The various phenomena like unsteady wake, flow separation and vortex shedding caused due to complicated blade geometry and changes in angle of attack are predicted and presented here. The effects of unsteady flow and dynamic stall are also predicted using CFD.

Biography

Dr. Chandrakant R. Sonawane received his Ph.D from Aerospace Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IITB), Mumbai, India, in 2013. Currently working as an Associate Professor at Mechanical Engineering Department, Symbiosis Institute of Technology (SIT), Symbiosis International University, Pune, Maharashtra, India. Dr Sonawane Chandrakant R is amongst the leading researcher in Pune, Maharashtra, India region who work in CFD domain. He published more than 30 publications as the main author and co-author in international journals, conferences and book. His current research area involves advanced fluid mechanics, advanced heat and mass transfer, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), Numerical simulation of incompressible/compressible flows, moving boundary problems, fluid-structure interaction, problem involving complex heat transfer.

Speaker
Chandrakant R Sonawane Symbiosis Institute of Technology, India

Abstract

Direct carbothermic reduction of alumina: Al2O3+3C=2 Al +3CO(g), proposed as an alternative process for primary aluminium production, requires temperatures above 2100°C, and suffers from critical design issues such as aluminium carbide and oxy-carbide formation, aluminium vaporization and low metal yields. During investigations on the Al2O3-C/Fe system, the carbothermic reduction of alumina and the formation of Fe-Al alloys was observed at 1550°C by our group. This reaction was confirmed through a variety of experimental measurements: x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, interfacial phenomena, video recording, carbon and aluminium pick-up by molten iron, and the generation of CO (g) as a function of time. Molten iron was found to act both as a reducing agent and a metallic solvent. We report here a new approach to produce Fe-Al-C alloys directly from the reduction of mixed oxides (Fe2O3 and Al2O3) at1550°C. The Al2O3-Fe2O3-C system was investigated at 1550°C using a horizontal tube furnace, Ar atmosphere, for times to 2 hours. Molten iron, produced in-situ from the reduction of iron oxide was used as an intermediate sink for capturing gaseous aluminium based reaction products, and help minimise aluminium losses.The reactions were complete within 30 minutes due to the generation of CO gas and associated turbulence. X-ray diffraction studies showed the presence of diffraction peaks belonging to Fe3AlC and Fe3Al systems. No diffraction peaks were observed for pure iron indicating its complete transformation to Fe-Al alloys. These results, well supported by SEM/EDS investigations, are being further optimised towards enhanced product yield and minimal losses.

Biography

Rita Khanna is currently working as an Associate Professor in the University of New South Wales, Australia. She is a senior researcher with a PhD in condensed matter physics with extensive research experience, both theoretical and experimental, in the fields of x-ray diffraction, theoretical modeling and atomistic computer simulations. Since 1997, Rita has brought her expertise to high temperature metallurgical processes and has developed a novel atomistic approach towards the fundamental understanding of basic reaction processes. She is a key member of UNSW super-computing fraternity and has published extensively.

Speaker
Rita Khanna The University of New South Wales, Australia

Abstract

Industries and researchers are trying to reduce the use of cutting fluid in the form of flood cooling so as to obtain safety, environmental and economical benefits. Dry machining is now of great interest due to environmentally friendly manufacturing. However, they are sometimes less effective when higher machining efficiency, better surface finish quality and severe cutting conditions are required. Widespread use of Superalloy Inconel 718 in most of the sophisticated manufacturing industry is due to their superior mechanical properties like high strength, heat and corrosion resistance etc. However, machining of this material is termed as difficult to cut material. During machining these alloys, tool wears rapidly because of high cutting temperature and strong adhesion between the tool and work material resulting from their low thermal conductivity and high reactivity characteristics. For this purpose a large amount of cutting fluid is flushed into the cutting zone to facilitate heat transfer from the cutting zone. However, the cutting fluids have many detrimental effects and not advisable due to environmental norms. In the present study an attempt has been made to show the effect of high speed green machining of aerospace grade super alloy Inconel 718 on the machinability aspects. It is an attempt to bridge the gap between flood cooling and dry machining to achieve sustainable machining.

Biography

Dr. Dineshsingh Thakur, working as a Associate professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Defence Institute of Advanced Technology (DU), DRDO- Pune,India. He has done his Masters and Ph.D. from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT)-Madras, India in the area of Mechanical Engineering. He has 125 well refereed International Journal and conference papers to his credit. He has delivered invited talks around 73 in various conferences, workshops and symposiums. He has worked in the capacity of Advisory Committee/Organizing committee member and Chaired the sessions of various International Conferences. He is Member of many Professional Bodies. He is regular reviewer of well referred International journals. His areas of research includes High speed green machining of aerospace materials, Precision/Surface engineering and fabrication and processing of composite materials.

Speaker
Dineshsingh Thakur Defence Institute of Advanced Technology (DU), DRDO, Pune, India

Abstract

Space-heating loss through the windows of solid wall dwellings is one of the factors contributing to high energy consumption. Despite of significant achievements in the vacuum glazing science a practicalbenefit of retrofitting triple vacuum glazing to consumers in terms of energy saving is unclear, partly due to which it poses challenges in bringing vacuum glazing technology in the UK market for mass production. This research forms a part of novel contribution in vacuum glazing science presenting the refurbishment technology of an experimentally achievable thermal performance of triple vacuum glazing to existing UK solid wall dwelling by investigating inter-dependent performance of triple vacuum glazing on to the solid wall insulation, in comparison to triple air-filled glazing. Dynamic thermal modelling and steady state analyses were carried out. From the transient model simulations, an annual space-heating load input to an un-insulated solid wall house retrofitted with triple air-filled glazed windows and triple vacuum glazed windows were predicted to be 23883.6 kWh (84.92%) and 23320.5 kWh (84.47%). With a similar comparison but to an externally insulated solid walls, the heat load inputs were predicted to be 10995.7 kWh (72.18%) and 10309.1 kWh (70.63%). The steady-state heat loss calculations indicated the percentage of heat loss reduction, when replacing triple air-filled glazed windows to triple vacuum glazed windows, to be approximately 1.58% for un-insulated solid walls and 3.02% for an externally insulated solid walls. It was shown that retrofitting existing solid wall houses are essential for not only to reduce space-heating energy requirements but it also signifies clear advantages of retrofitting triple vacuum glazing’s into a house.A more realistic approach have to be further explored when these result will be compared with the experimental results of space-heating performance when replacing triple air-filled glazed windows to triple vacuum glazed windows.

Biography

Dr Saim Memon is a Lecturer in Electrical Engineering and Degree Apprenticeship Program Lead at London South Bank University. He teaches HND/BEng modules and supervises BEng/MEng/PhD students projects. He is a Fellow of Higher Education Academy and having a Qualified Teacher status by General Teaching Council for Scotland UK with PG Cert Teaching Qualification from University of Aberdeen. He did his PhD in Electrical and Electronic Engineering from Loughborough University UK, MSc in Mechatronics from Staffordshire University UK and BEng(Hons) in Electrical Engineering from Mehran UET, Pakistan. He specialises in Vacuum Insulated Glazing and Solar Thermal Energy applications in Buildings and Electrical Power Generation. He undertakes research in the area of human thermal comfort, applied heat transfer and renewable energy systems. His research working experience is on High performance low-cost vacuum-insulated-glazing which is a key development in the move to more energy-efficient buildings. The aim of his research is to establish a validated and comprehensive mechanism for reducing UK domestic energy and carbon emissions that is acceptable and appealing to users with vacuum-insulated-glazings, vacuum insulations, electrochromic glazing, cost-effective insulating materials and building integrated solar thermal collectors. He has been a writer of many EC-H2020 and Innovate UK grant proposals at the time of being Technologist-Research Engineer

Speaker
Saim Memon London South Bank University, UK

Abstract

Developing robust design solutions with respect to performance, aswellasfeasibility,isoneof themost important concernsinengineeringoptimization. Inthiswork,wepresentanewrobust optimization approach whichincorporatesthetwomain concepts of robust optimization: objective robustness and feasibility robustness. Themajority ofrobustoptimization techniquesconsideroneofthetwoconceptsofrobustness. Ournew approach is based on the combined conventional and minimumsensitivityoptimizationapproaches. Theconventional optimizationapproach provides asolutionwhichhasthehighest performance,wheretheminimumsensitivityapproachdevelopsasolutionwiththeleastsensitivity tovariations. Forthenew approach,weprovide anewformulationinwhichtheconventional objectivefunctionandtheminimum sensitivity functionaresolved inabi-objectiveoptimizationproblem. Aperturbationanalysisiscarried using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation approach. A comparison between the three optimization approaches (conventional,minimumsensitivity,andcombined)isprovided. Thevalidity ofthenewapproachisascertainedthroughtestbed problems. Fivecasestudiesinvolving theoptimizationofreal engineeringsystemsarepresentedusingthedevelopedapproach. An optimizationcodeisdevelopedusingMatlab environment.

Biography

Dr.Mohamed Hassan Gadallah currently working as a Technical Advisor, Education Development Fund (EDF). The Egyptian Cabinet of Ministers and the Chairman of Operations Research Department, Institute of Statistical Studies and Research, Cairo University from 2009 to 2010. He worked as a Professor of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research, Department of Mechanical Design and Production, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University. He assisted in initiating, teaching for second, third and fourth year in the faculty of Computers and Information Technology, Cairo University from 1999 to 2002. He received his PhD from McMaster University in Canada in 1995. He joined LCF Manufacturing (part of ABC Group of Canada) as Engineering Manager, 1995 to 1996.He joined Indiana University , Purdue University, University of Illinois at Chicago and Mons University in 2002, 2004 and 2015 as a Visiting Scholar. His research interests include approximation modelling and optimisation using Artificial Neural Networks and Response Surface Methodology, Quality Engineering and Design of Experiments. He is an Associate Editor to Transactions of Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering

Speaker
Mohamed H. Gadallah Cairo University, Egypt

Sessions:

Scientific Sessions

Abstract

Knowledge of mechanical properties is quite important in the design of various kinds of materials. Due to their excellent physical, mechanical, and electrical properties, nanostructures have attracted much attention among the scientists/researchers to develop innovatory applications in the field of nanomechanics. Proper understanding of their mechanical behavior is a key factor in the production of such engineering structures. Among these nanostructures, single walled carbon nanotubes viz. nanobeams attract more attention due to their great potential in engineering applications such as nanowires, nanoprobes, atomic force microscope (AFM), nanotube resonators, nanoactuators, and nanosensors etc. Structural members with variable cross section are frequently used in civil, mechanical, and aeronautical engineering to satisfy architectural requirements. In practical cases such as space structures, this type of vibration analysis plays an important role in design. Many engineers currently design light slender members with variable cross sections to construct ever-stronger and ever-lighter structures. Unfortunately, design engineers are lacking proper knowledge on the design of nonuniform structural elements since most of the design specifications are available for uniform elements. Hence there is a need for vibration analysis of nonuniform structural elements. Many structural elements have variable flexural rigidity which may be due to different reasons (technological). As such present paper investigates vibration analysis of such nonhomogeneous nanobeams. Differential Quadrature Method (DQM) has been applied to investigate free vibration of exponentially varying stiffness of nanobeams based on nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. Here, we assume an exponential variation of the flexural stiffness (EI) since the flexural stiffness of the nanobeams may not be constant for a geometrically non-uniform beam model. For this we consider a nanotube with nonuniform variation of the cross section along the length. Based on the proposed exponential variation, the flexural stiffness is defined as X EI  (EI0 )e where I0 is the mass moment of area at the left end and  is a positive constant. Application of DQ method in the governing differential equation converts the problem to a generalized eigenvalue problem and its solution gives frequency parameters. Present results are compared with other available results by taking   0 and are found to be in good agreement. Besides all these, a convergence study has also been carried out for finding minimum number of grid points to obtain the new results (for nonhomogeneous cases) by taking different  (  0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8,1.0) . Finally, this article also addresses the effect of nonlocal parameter, boundary conditions and length to thickness ratio on the frequency parameters.

Biography

S. Chakraverty is having experience of 27 years as a researcher and teacher. Presently he is working in the Department of Mathematics (Applied mathematics Group), National Institute of Technology Rourkela, Odisha as a full Professor. Prior to this he was with CSIR-Central Building Research Institute, Roorkee, India. After completing Graduation from St. Columba’s College (Ranchi University), his career started from University of Roorkee (Now, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee) and did M.Sc.(Mathematics) & M.Phil. (Computer Applications) from there securing the First positions in the university. Dr. Chakraverty received his Ph. D. from IIT Roorkee in 1992. There after he did his post-doctoral research at Institute of Sound and Vibration Research (ISVR), University of Southampton, U.K. and at the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science, Concordia University, Canada. He was also a visiting professor at Concordia and McGill universities, Canada, during 1997-1999 and visiting professor of University of Johannesburg, South Africa during 2011 to 2014. He has authored co-authored11 books, published 280 research papers(till date) in journals and conferences and two more books are ongoing. He is in the Editorial Boards of various International Journals, Book Series and Conferences. Dr. Chakraverty is the Chief Editor of International Journal of Fuzzy Computation and Modelling(IJFCM), Inderscience Publisher, Switzerland and happens to be the Guest Editor for other few journals. He is also the reviewer of around 50national and international journals of repute and he was the President of the Section of Mathematical sciences (including Statistics) of Indian Science Congress (2015-2016)and was the Vice President – Orissa Mathematical Society (2011 to 2013). Dr. Chakraverty is recipient of few prestigious awards viz. Indian National Science Academy (INSA) nomination under International Collaboration Bilateral Exchange Program (with Czech Republic), Platinum Jubilee ISCA Lecture Award (2014),CSIR Young Scientist (1997), BOYSCAST (DST), UCOST Young Scientist (2007, 2008), Golden Jubilee Director’s (CBRI) Award (2001), INSA InternationalBilateral Exchange Award ([2010-11 (selected but could not undertake), 2015 (selected)], Roorkee University gold Medals (1987, 1988)for first positions in M. Sc. And M. Phil. etc. He has already guided eleven (11) Ph. D. students and nine are ongoing. Dr. Chakraverty has undertaken around 16 research projects as Principle Investigator funded by international and national agenciestotaling about Rs.1.5 crores. A good number of International and national Conferences, Workshops and Training programmes have also been organised by him. His present research area includes Soft Computing and Machine Intelligence, Artificial Neural Network, Fuzzy and Interval Computations,Numerical Analysis, Differential Equations, Mathematical Modeling, Uncertainty Modelling, Vibration and Inverse Vibration Problems.Following are his Google and Scopus citations till date

Speaker
S. Chakraverty National Institute of Technology Rourkela
India

Abstract

The basic reliability concepts - parametric ALT plan, failure mechanism and design, acceleration factor, and sample size equation were used in the development of a parametric accelerated life testing method to assess the reliability quantitative test specifications (RQ) of mechanical systems subjected to repetitive stresses. To calculate the acceleration factor of the mechanical system, a generalized life-stress failure model with a new effort concept was derived and recommended. The new sample size equation with the acceleration factor also enabled the parametric ALT to quickly evaluate the expected lifetime. This new parametric ALT should help an engineer uncover the design parameters affecting reliability during the design process of the mechanical system. Consequently, it should help companies improve product reliability and avoid recalls due to the product failures in the field. As the improper design parameters in the design phase are experimentally identified by this new reliability design method and recent patents are addressed, the mechanical system should improve in reliability as measured by the increase in lifetime, LB, and the reduction in failure rate,

Biography

Dr Woo has a BS and MS in Mechanical Engineering, and he has obtained PhD in Mechanical Engineering from Texas A&M. He major in energy system such as HVAC and its heat transfer, optimal design and control of refrigerator, reliability design of thermal components, and failure Analysis of thermal components in marketplace using the Non-destructive such as SEM & XRAY. In 1992.03–1997 he worked in Agency for Defense Development, Chinhae, South Korea, where he has researcher in charge of Development of Naval weapon System. Now he is working as a Senior Reliability Engineer in Side-by-Side Refrigerator Division, Digital Appliance, SAMSUNG Electronics, and focus on enhancing the life of refrigerator as using the accelerating life testing. He also has experience about Side-by-Side Refrigerator Design for Best Buy, Lowe’s, Cabinet-depth Refrigerator Design for General Electrics.

Speaker
SeongwooWoo Reliability Association of Korea, Seoul, Korea

Abstract

The foremost aim of today’s production industries is to manufacture products of acceptable quality with minimized cost and cycle time. The manufacturing process, cutting parameters, dimensional and geometrical accuracies are the key factors in fulfilling this objective. This work endeavours to develop and validate an Artificial Neural Networks Model to predict Dimensional and Geometrical Accuracies for a given set of cutting conditions during turning of Stainless Steel 316 (Marine Grade Steel) in an all geared lathe. The effective selection of cutting conditions plays a very important role in assuring the Dimensional Accuracy and Geometrical Accuracy in addition to reducing the cost. Three continuous predictors (Depth of Cut, Feed Rate and Cutting Speed) and two categorical predictors (Cutting Environment and Tool Material) are used to develop the model. The work piece dimension is φ30mmx150 mm long. High Speed Steel (HSS), Uncoated Carbide and Coated Carbide are the Cutting Tool Materials used. Design of Experiment is performed using Taguchi’s Orthogonal Array. The responses like Diameter, Circularity and Run-out are measured using a Coordinate Measuring Machine. A theoretical model establishing a relationship between the predictors and the responses using Artificial Neural Network is generated. This model is used to predict the Diameter, Circularity and Run-out for a given set of operating conditions. The developed model is validated to ensure its prediction capability.

Biography

Received B.Tech (Hons). degree in Production Technology from Madras Institute of Technology, Anna University, India, and M.E. Degree in Manufacturing Technology from Regional Engineering College (Currently NIT), Tiruchirapalli, India. Received Ph.D. degree in Management and Leadership Sciences from the West Coast University, Panama in 2013. Has 33 years of experience out of which 23 years is in Universities and Colleges. Current research interests include Metal Cutting and Tolerance Technology.

Speaker
R. Panneer SASTRA University, School of Mechanical Engineering, Thanjavur, Tamilnadu, India.

Abstract

This work presents a comparative study between an electrical vehicle and its counterpart version, a conventional Diesel vehicle with 5300 kg, M3 class, both used for urban applications. The application was chosen because it attends the requirements of electric vehicle performance. The comparative parameters evaluated are energy consumption, electric of as fuel content, CO2 emissions, from electric energy generation or in the conventional vehicle exhaust, and economic viability in terms of payback and net present value (NPV). Diesel oil consumption and electricity consumption were determined from field tests performed in the city of Sete Lagoas, for which it was proposed a test to match the drive cycle requirements found in urban application. Total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from Diesel and electric technologies were obtained from the calculation of electricity production and fuel transformation along the phases of well-to-wheel methodology. A sensitive analysis of NPV and emissions difference between the technologies was performed for a lifetime of 15 years

Biography

Eduardo Falcao has completed his master's degree in automotive engineering (electric vehicles) at the age of 33 years from Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais (Brasil) and Bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering at the age of 25 years from Federal University of São Joao del Rei (Brasil). He worked in aerospace industry in Munich (Germany) in the area of passenger business jet projects as product development engineer (2007/2008 P + Z engineering, an ARRK group company). He is a product development coordinator working as vehicle architecture engineer at IVECO, a company of CNH Industrial group. He has published the paper Analysis of CO2 emissions and techno-economic feasibility of an electric commercial vehicle (Applied Energy Journal, Elsevier)

Speaker
Eduardo Aparecido Moreira Falcao Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Brasil

Abstract

Vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) is a self-sustained vibration, mostly appeared in practical phenomena related to tree waving in the wind, cable swings, and flag fluttering. To fully understand the wake, thrust and wake interactions in VIV is very important to number of industries, such as heat exchangers, bridges, submarines, offshore structures and other applications. For stable energy transfer self-sustained vibration of the oscillator to be periodic. VIV phenomena of moving two identical side-by-side square cylinders have been investigated numerically by using the lattice Boltzmann method.The periodical and non-periodical oscillations for different separation ratios at Reynolds number 100 will be discussed in detail. In addition, the frequency content of the lateral and longitudinal forces acting on cylinders surfaces will be also discussed and its impact on the hydrodynamic forces. The primary and secondary cylinders interaction frequencies will also be discussed.

Biography

Dr. Shams-ul-Islam is working at COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad, Mathematics Department as a associate professor. His current research interests are: numerical simulation of flow past bluff bodies, fluid-structure interactions, computational fluid dynamics, structural analysis, and grid generation for complex flow problems, heat and mass transfer using different numerical methods such as Lattice Boltzmann method, Finite Difference Method etc.He received his PhD in 2010 from the Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen Graduate School under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Zhou Chao Ying. He also received his FSC and BSC in science subjects from Islamia College Peshawar and MSC in Mathematics from Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad.

Speaker
Shams-ul-Islam COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan

Abstract

Numerical approximations for two-phase flow models have been an interesting topic for many authors. This talks presents a well-balanced scheme for a model of two-phase flows, which is arisen from the modeling of deflagration-to-detonation transition in porous energetic materials. First, we transform the system into an equivalent one which can be regarded as a composition of three subsystems. Then, depending on the characterization of each subsystem, we propose a convenient numerical treatment of the subsystem separately. Precisely, in the first subsystem of the governing equations in the gas phase, stationary waves are used to absorb the nonconservative terms into an underlying numerical scheme. In the second subsystem of conservation laws of the mixture we can take a suitable scheme for conservation laws. For the third subsystem of the compaction dynamics equation, the fact that the velocities remain constant across solid contacts suggests us to employ the technique of Engquist-Osher's scheme. Then, we prove that our method possesses some interesting properties: it preserves the positivity of the volume fractions in both phases, and in the gas phase, our scheme is capable of capturing equilibrium states, preserves the positivity of the density, and satisfies the numerical minimum entropy principle. The scheme is shown to be numerically stable and robust. Numerical tests show that our scheme can provide reasonable approximations. Furthermore, recent developments on the topic are also addressed.

Biography

Mai Duc Thanh is Associate Professor at International University from 2010, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. He obtained his PhD in Numerical Analysis in 2003 at Ecole Polytechnique de Paris, France. His researches include analysis of shock waves and numerical schemes for conservation laws, with applications in fluid mechanics and in particular two-phase flow models. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a referee for many journals.

Speaker
Mai Duc Thanh International University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Abstract

Here we consider the continuous and discontinuous analysis of the temperature, displacement and stress fields in a thick plate whose lower and upper surfaces are traction free and subjected to a given axisymmetric temperature distribution and an internal heat generation within the solid. The problems are formulated in the context of Lord-Shulman, Green-Lindsay and Classical coupled theories of Thermoelasticity. Integral transform technique is developed to determine the solutions and illustrated the results numerically for copper material.

Biography

Dr. Kishor C. Deshmukh has completed his undergraduate, postgraduate and Doctoral studies at R.T.M. Nagpur University, Nagpur in 1981, 1983 and 1998 respectively. Dr. Kishor C. Deshmukh has shouldered many senior level administrative positions in the University. A few notable assignments include: Dean-Faculty of Science, Chairman Board of studies in Mathematics, Members-Faculty member of Science Faculty, Senate, Academic Council, Management Council, Board of Examination, Library Committee, Finance and Account, Budget Committee. He was the member of Research Development Committee (RDC) at Devi Ahilya University, Indore and Rani Durgawati University, Jabalpur. Presently he is a member of Research and Recognition Committee at RTM Nagpur University Nagpur, Shivaji University Kolhapur and Dr. Ambedkar Marathwada University Aurangabad.

Speaker
K. C. Deshmukh RTM Nagpur University Nagpur, India

Abstract

Wearable sensors have typically been prepared on conventional substrates, such as silicon, PDMS, and copper mesh. Herein, we have presented a novel and facile approach for developing bendable and foldable strain sensors based on paper substrates patterned with reduced graphene oxide (rGO-paper) that allow full-range operation of wearable electronics. On the one hand, rGO-paper sensors maintain the simplicity of paper-based devices; on the other hand, these devices are inexpensive, scalable and highly sensitive to tiny deflections over a broad sensing range. Gauge factor of our flexible rGO-paper sensors is about 66.6 ±5 within 6 % strain. Highly sensitive rGO-papers can detect a strain change as minute as 0.001. The experimentally measured relative resistances with respect to incremental steps in the bending angles indicate that the limits of detection are as small as -0.2° and 1° for compressive and tensile bending, respectively. Benefiting from their high sensitivity, foldable rGO-paper sensors have a wide detection range over the period load. rGO-paper allows freedom in the choice of creative and delicate designs. Although rGO-papers have limited stretchability, their high folding and bending sensitivity enables the design of paper-based wearable sensors for the real-time monitoring of large range human movements. For the first time, we have demonstrated the use of rGO-paper sensors as wearable devices for detecting human body moments and controlling robotic hands. Furthermore, highly sensitive rGO-paper sensors were used to develop a paper-based keyboard. The rGO-paper sensors provide a stable change in conductance during initial bending/folding cycles and allow us to plan for a low-cost and use-and-through paper-based sensor, which open a new door of biodegradable electronics.

Biography

Dr. Biswajit Saha has completed PhD from Nanyang Technological University- Singapore and Massachusetts Institute of Technology – USA (Singapore MIT alliance). At present he is contract Assistant Professor in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering of Seoul National University - South Korea. Dr. Saha has co-organized various international conferences (SPARCA 2017, Okinawa-Japan; ISAMR 2017, Sun Moon Lake-Taiwan), published book and paper at reputed journals and delivered talks as keynote speaker.

Speaker
Biswajit Saha Seoul National University; Seoul, South Korea

Abstract

Advanced composite materials have wide applications in aerospace, automotive, maritime and household products. In the new generation of aircraft design and development, more advanced composites material are used in commercial aircraft manufacturing due to its high strength- to- weight ratio property. For machining fiber-reinforced plastics such as Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) and Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) as well as difficult to machine materials such as Titanium and Inconel, Gandtrack Ltd has specially developed new tool solutions to address these specific requirements. The portfolio covers standard products made of Tungsten Carbide and Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) tools and also customer-specific custom solutions. Nowadays, most part of the aircraft component is made in stack-up material that give challenges to the tool manufacturer in order to produce an optimize tool geometry for the specific machining process. The recent advancement in tool geometry optimization and coating application would increase the life span and indirectly would reduce the tool consumption.

Biography

Muhammad Hafizis an Application Specialist at Gandtrack Ltd which is the market leader in the design and manufacturer of specialist cutting tools for the composite specifically in Aerospace Industry. He has been with the company for more than 6 years. He is currently the Head of Research and Development team in Advanced Machining Lab which based in Malaysia and managing the work packages for Airbus A320, A320 and Boeing 787 assembly component. At Malaysia, he also involves with customer regarding on the quality issues and process development for a new project focusing on the optimum design cutter. He graduated from Universiti Sains Malaysia, with Bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering and Master in Mechanical Engineering specialized in a new method of composite manufacturing process in aircraft application. Recently, he just completed his doctorate in Mechanical Engineering from Universiti Sains Malaysia in cutter design optimization in modern aircraft drilling application. His main interests was the composite materials, processes and machining process

Speaker
Muhammad Hafiz b Hassan Gandtrack Ltd,Oldham, United Kingdom

Abstract

The conventional simulation model used in the prediction of long-term infrastructure development systems such as public–private partnership (PPP)–build-operate-transfer (BOT) projects assumes single probabilistic values for all of the input variables. Traditionally, all the input risks and uncertainties in Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) are modeled based on probability theory. Its result is shown by a probability distribution function (PDF) and a cumulative distribution function (CDF), which are utilized for analyzing and decision making. In reality, however, some of the variables are estimated based on expert judgment and others are derived from historical data. Further, the parameters’ data of the probability distribution for the simulation model input are subject to change and difficult to predict. Therefore, a simulation model that is capable of handling both types of fuzzy and probabilistic input variables is needed and vital. Recently fuzzy randomness, which is an extension of classical probability theory, provides additional features and improvements for combining fuzzy and probabilistic data to overcome aforementioned shortcomings. Fuzzy randomness–Monte Carlo simulation (FR-MCS) technique is a hybrid simulation method used for risk and uncertainty evaluation. The proposed approach permits any type of risk and uncertainty in the input values to be explicitly defined prior to the analysis and decision making. It extends the practical use of the conventional MCS by providing the capability of choosing between fuzzy sets and probability distributions. This is done to quantify the input risks and uncertainties in a simulation. A new algorithm for generating fuzzy random variables is developed as part of the proposed FR-MCS technique based on the αα-cut. FR-MCS output results are represented by fuzzy probability and the decision variables are modeled by fuzzy CDF. The FR-MCS technique is demonstrated in a PPP-BOT case study. The FR-MCS results are compared with those obtained from conventional MCS. It is shown that the FR-MCS technique facilitates decision making for both the public and private sectors’ decision makers involved in PPP-BOT projects. This is done by determining a negotiation bound for negotiable concession items (NCIs) instead of precise values as are used in conventional MCS results. This approach prevents prolonged and costly negotiations in the development phase of PPP-BOT projects by providing more flexibility for decision makers. Both parties could take advantage of this technique at the negotiation table.

Biography

Dr Meghdad Attarzadeh is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow and R&D Manager in the Centre for Infrastructure Systems (CIS) at the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. Dr Meghdad Attarzadeh obtained his PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering, with specialization in Construction Engineering and Management, from National University of Singapore (NUS) in January 2015. His BSc. (Civil and Environmental Engineering) and MSc. (Construction Engineering and Management) degrees are both awarded by Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Tehran, Iran. He has more than 14 years’ professional experiences, including teaching and research in the field of Construction Engineering and Management. He has authored over 12 technical reports and papers in various proceedings and journals on Construction Engineering and Management, primary inventor of an IP (pending), awardee of Awardsand prizes. He worked as reviewer for many international conferences and journals such as ASCE Journal of Management in Engineering, Construction Management and Economics, ASCE-ASME Journal of Risk and Uncertainty in Engineering Systems, Part A: Civil Eng., ISARC, Construction Research Congress (CRC), IPMC, etc.

Speaker
Meghdad Attarzadeh Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Abstract

Nickel based steel alloys, advanced ceramics and titanium alloys are the most commonly used materials in the industries like aerospace, energy, petrochemical, and biomedical industries. These materials offer unique combination of heat resistance, corrosion resistance, toughness, high operating temperature, and strength-to-weight ratio. These materials are termed as ‘‘Difficult to cut materials’’ because of their low machinability rating. They are difficult to machine because of properties like low thermal conductivity, high strength at elevated temperatures, brittleness in case of advanced ceramics and high chemical reactivity. Machining of advanced materials causes problems of surface integrity with conventional machining methods. Selection of cutting tool materials is always a challenge for manufacturers to develop good surface finish products. The technology of cutting tools is rapidly improving and this development is necessary to improve the wear resistance and performance of machining on difficult-to-cut materials. Recent developments of new tools, tool geometry and high speed CNC machines provide better options towards machining advanced materials using conventional machining methods, and setting new prospects for essentially widening the scope of implementation. The end milling machining process is the most versatile and rapid method for removing excess material and producing high quality surface products. The CNC conventional end milling machining can be implemented to bring up to acceptable surface quality for advanced materials using recent development of cutting tools and resulting in a significant reduction in grinding process and time. This will greatly reduce the overall machining process cost by minimizing or completely avoiding the cost of grinding without compromising the quality of the product. In this work, newly developed tools are proposed for machining of advanced ceramics and nickel based alloys to improve the machinability. Also discuss the challenges involved in machining of advanced ceramics and nickel-based alloys.

Biography

Dr. Mohan Reddy Moola working as a Associate Professor in Mechanical Engineering Department, Curtin University Sarawak Campus. He obtained his PhD (Manufacturing area) from Curtin University and Master Degree (Mechanical Systems, Dynamics and Control) from I.I.T. Kharagpur.He has been involved in teaching, research, and students’ supervision at undergraduate and postgraduate level for the last 17 years. His current research focused on the machining of advanced materials and ceramics. He has more than 30 publications in reputable international journals and conference proceedings. He is the project leader for couple of funded projects by the Ministry of Higher Education, (MOHE), Malaysia.

Speaker
Mohan Reddy Curtin University, Malaysia

Will be updated soon...


Change Color