Scientific Program

Sessions:

Scientific Sessions

Abstract

Unlike conventional materials like metals, insulators and semiconductors etc. the metamaterials are designed materials, whose properties can be engineered in several ways. They appear under the class of smart materials, fabricated from assemblies of multiple elements from composite materials or plastics to exhibit specific electromagnetic or acoustic properties, which are not observed in materials commonly found in nature. Here I shall focus on one particular type: acoustic metamaterials (AMM). Over the past decade there has been significant development in the field of acoustic metamaterials at the cutting edge of science and technology. AMM has many novel properties, which can be manipulated for unusual applications. In this talk I shall present a brief history of ‘metamaterials’ with particular emphasis on AMM. Like metamaterials for electromagnetic field, AMM has a special feature of double negative parameters in a band of frequencies in acoustic fields. These parameters in AMM are effective density and bulk modulus. Manipulation of these special properties leads to novel applications, which I shall highlight. An example of seismic waveguide of artificial AMM will be presented based on our recent work

Biography

Mukunda P Das is Honorary Professor in Theoretical Physics of the Australian National University. He is Fellow of American Physical Society, Institute of Physics (UK) and Australian Institute of Physics. His research interest spans the fundamental aspects of condensed matter, which include Meso- and Nanoscopic Systems, Superconductivity, Vortex Matter, Bose-Einstein Condensation, Strongly Correlated Electrons, Density Functional Theory and Theory of Disordered States. He is also interested in the professional ethics, an important subject of philosophy. He has been member of Editorial Boards of several international journals, J. Physics: Condensed Matter (IOP)(2002-2012), ANS: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, GSTF Journal of Physics and Applications, Condensed Matter- Open Acess Journal, Inter. J Condensed Matter, Advanced Materials and Superconductivity Research, Nova Sc., New York and others

Speaker
Mukunda P Das / The Australian National University, Australia

Abstract

The subject is focusing on the newly adjusted thermodynamic degree of freedom which is dimension. Involved nanostructured systems have a rich history beginning with a colloidal solution - heterogeneous mixture in which the particle size of the substance is intermediate between a true solution and a suspension, i.e., between 1-1000 nm (even smoke from a fire is a good example). Imperative status has a colloidal gold as a suspension (or colloid) of submicron sized particles of gold in a fluid (water) or glass providing an intense red color (for particles <100 nm ) or blue purple (for larger particles). J. Herschel invented in 1842 a photographic process called chrysotype that used colloidal gold to record images on paper. Some properties of inherent nanoparticles were investigated using the term micro-clusters (which term was used for the first time in 1661 by English chemist R. Boyle) and associated with Alchemist process of multiplied division. Modern description came with the paper introducing the term ‘microcluster’ as a new phase of matter and book showing that they cannot be formed fully accidentally but the atoms are combined according some ‘magic numbers’ (e.g. Fibonacci following the calcium clusters series 561, 923, 1415, 2057, etc). The particle is in order of size (3N d) where N is the number of atoms and d is their diameter showing that for d~2-3 A is N~2-10 nm. There exists metal model clusters describing systems up to 80 atoms. The number of atoms of a nanoparticle can be derived from the Loschmidt number giving 2.6x1019 atoms in a cubic cm of a substance so that about 104 atoms are contained in nanoparticle cube with a side of 100 nm. It associates with a notion of the so-cooled Planck’s mass amounting 2.17x105g and specifying the boundary of quantum world. In a crystallographic view spheres of a given radius or regular tetrahedral with a given edge can be assumed as the most closely packed in space, i.e., crowded so that the ratio between the filled part of the space and the unfilled part would be as large as possible. Using polyhedra the whole space could be filled by appropriate packing of the congruent specimens of these polyhedra starting e.g. from a cube, adge, a, (surface/volume: A/V  6/a), terehedron, via penta-, hexa-, hepta-, nona-, deca-, dodeca-, icosa-, triaconta-, hexaconta-, enneaconta-, up to an infinite faceted ultimate sphere of radius, r, (A/V  2/r). Another important process of covering a space with polyhedra is the so called stellation, following the historical Kepler constructions (year 1611) of the first two other stellar polyhedron from dodecahedron. This multiplication process of self-repetition yields the specificity of a self-similar system which shows statistically the same properties at many scales and which is well known as sourced on the Koch curves (i.e. snowflakes), further defining the self-similarity dimension in the sphere of fractals expressing thus the complexity of an object and giving the intermediary to chaos (supposing both ways from the top to bottom and vice versa). Similarly assumed clustering is close to the real pattern of a structure evolution from disorder (chaos), local ordering up to periodic structures sometimes including structural code or even inorganic gene and became close to the topic of chemistry beyond the molecule and special associated as superatoms exhibiting the quantum properties of nanoclusters (i.e. quantum nature of nanaostes). Nanoworld thermodynamic groundwork unfolds from a single phase division into α and β separated by interface the curvature of which request the higher pressure on the concave side with respect to the surrounding, p, i.e., pα > pβ = p (Young-Laplace effect). It can happen by splitting up (division, cleavage) or nucleation, as well as by elastic deformation (strain) of already existing surface due to the impact if isotropic or nonisotropis stress, dwsurf =  dA, where the scalar parameter γ (defined as a specific surface energy) is always positive (due to the stability criteria) and is independent on the surface, A. Performed work, dwsurf = f dAelast = f A dε, causes elastic deformation (strain ε) of the original surface assuming dε = dA/A. Unite specific surface work is called surface stress, f, and possesses generally tensor denomination but for isotropous environment become scalar following wsurf = f Aelast. As a result we can say that any nanosystem possesses its size as an extra degree of freedom, equilibrium of which requires a modification of traditional macroscopic thermodynamics. Everything factually originates from the Kelvin historical relation, p/p= 2V/(RTr), and the related equation for temperatures, T/T =2V /(ΔH r). In the other words it means that if we want to create any equilibrium modification for a variation of curvature upon the change of external conditions (T, p) we have to change either pressure (from pβ to pβr under constant T) or temperature (from T to Tr under constant) so that the change in the difference of bulk chemical potentials Δ is compensated by negative 2γVαm(1/r). Certainly there exists further particularizing models such as liquid skin melting (LSM) assuming that melting starts on the particle surface creating thus a thing surface layer of the thickness δ (an adjustable parameter) so that T/T=1-(2V/(ΔH(r-δ)) eventually including the shape dependability T/T=1-(A/VΔH) (sol - liq) where for a sphere A/V equals 3/r. Another impact relates to the particle volume contraction V due to the internal over-pressure which often results to the internal phase transition. Also the mixing enthalpy ΔHmix (and Gibbs energy ΔG) depends on the particle size and the atomic distribution of which may vary from the flat to curved surface owing to the cause of curvature yielding thus a surface interface segregation. There are yet unsolved specifics of melting due to the characteristic of the interface, such as coherent (with a small elastic deformation due to the small differences of atomic arrangements) and incoherent (with a large elastic deformation due to the significant differences in atomic arrangements). On the temperature dependence of melting for nanoparticles of indium in the matrix of alumina prepared through different techniques it was experimentally observed opposite temperature behavior of particles obtained by extreme melt-fast-quenching (firmly built-in the matrices thus having little volume flexibility) and those loosely integrated particle (produced by intensive ball milling having thus more space within the matrices) exhibiting classically assumed decrease of melting temperature upon the diminishing particle diameter (d). Correspondingly, it is necessary to consider the effect of the particle-matrix interaction in the case of polymeric nanocomposites wherein nanoobjects (often nanofibres) are continuously surrounded by rigid solid phase often as a core-shell structure, the interior being covered with a thin surface layer of another material (filament surface chemically ached, oxidized, etc). It associates similar effect as rapidly changed temperature when observing real shapes kinetic phase diagrams (temperature shifts) providing a new space for novel thermophysical studies including impact of eccentricity of heat transfer, heat capacities or phase relations in nanodimensional space.

Biography

Dr.Jaroslav Šesták is an honorary citizen of Prague, an emeritus researcher at the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and a professor at the Center for New Technologies, West Bohemian University in Pilsen. He holds the highest honors of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Heyrovsky Medal 2000) and of the Czech Chemical Society (Hanuš Medal 1998) as well as international awards such as Kurnakov Medal (USSR 1985 and Russia 2015), Bodenheimer Medal (Israel 1987), Patras Medal (Greece 2007) or the Netzsch Awards (Germany 2014). Recently he received supreme state award 2017 by the president of the Czech Republic. He became the guarantor of a number of institutions such as the School of Energy Science of Kyoto University in Japan, the Faculty of Humanities at the Charles University in Prague and the Czech Department of the American University of New York in Prague, where he lectured for twenty years on an interdisciplinary subject "On the Crossroads of Science and Philosophy of Nature". He is a founding member of the journals Thermochimica Acta (Elsevier, 1969), J. Mining and Metallurgy (Bor, 1996) and Int. J. Applied Glass Research (Wiley, 2009). He wrote three hundred expert papers, delivered hundreds of professional and popularizing lectures and in the year 2000 he was among the 20 best cited Czech physicists (thermodynamics). He has been involved in the emergence of new scientific disciplines such as kinetic phase diagrams, glass-forming theory, inorganic bioadaptibility, economical thermodynamics, generalized thermal analysis scheme in climatology or non-isothermal kinetics, where his Sestak-Berggren equation is cited more than a thousand times. He is the author and editor of fifteen books, which he often edited graphically, supplemented by photographs, and where he also designed their covers. His triptych on thermal physics published by Springer in the series “Hot topics of thermal analysis” was ranked between the Springer best twenty books.

Speaker
Jaroslav Šesták / West Bohemian University, Czech Republic

Abstract

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a nanotechnological multifunctional molecular platform for measuring of physicochemical and functional properties ofsingle proteins molecules. AFM was used for visualization of oligomeric state, activity, elasticity and electron transfer of single molecules of CYP 102A1 (BM3). It was shown that BM3 in watersolution exists as monomer and different oligomers by use sharp and supersharp AFM probes. Functional activity of single monomers and oligomers of BM3 was measured by AFM as well. The BM3 height fluctuations amplitude(HFA) during catalytic cycle is much larger than the HFA of the enzyme molecules in the resting state.It was found that an average HFA of dimers P450 BM3 during catalytic cycle increased up to 5.0±2Å•s-1 that was 2.5 times larger than an HFA of P450 BM3 in the resting state. It was obtained that the HFAof immobilized on mica cytochrome P450 BM3 depends on temperature, and 22˚C is a peak of this temperature profile.Mass spectrometry (MS) measurements were used to obtain a time course of a hydroxylation product of lauric acid oxidation during the enzymatic reaction of P450 BM3 in two cases: when enzyme was solubilized in the volume and when it was immobilized on the mica chip. In both cases the number of enzyme molecules was ≈1010, and the kinetics was linear during the first 10 minutes. It was shown that in the case of solubilized enzyme kcat=10-3 s-1, and in the case of immobilized enzyme kcat=0.4•10-3 s-1 that was 2.5 times less than the first one. The purpose of our work was to find a relationship between enzyme HFAand its catalytic activity. Therefore, AFM data was analyzed together with MS data and the following equation was obtained: kcat= β• (exp(ΔA/ A0)-1, where kcat – is a catalytic rate constant (s-1); β is a proportionality factor (s-1); ΔA = Δ Ā – A0 (Å), where Ā and A0 are the average amplitudes of P450 BM3 height oscillations in the active and resting states, respectively. The value β = 5•10-6 s-1 was calculated from time dependence of reaction curves measured by AFM and MS.Elasticity of single protein was measured based on deformation of this protein under AFM probes with various radii of curvature. Young’s modulus of BM3 molecules depends on AFM modes.Based on the obtained data, the following conclusions may be made: the enzyme catalytic activity of single molecules can be measured as an HFA of BM3 oscillation during catalytic cycle.

Biography

Dr.Alexander I Archakov is the Director of the V.N. Orekhovich Institute of Biomedical Chemistry of RAMS and Full member of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences (RAMS).He is a member of the International Scientific Committee on Microsomes & Drug Oxidation, on Biophysics and Biochemistry of the Cytochrome P450, Council member of the International Human Proteome Organization (HUPO), Member of the European Academy of Sciences, member of the European Society of Biochemical Pharmacology and Biochemical Society of Great Britain; member of the IUBMB and New York Academy of Science, Chief Editor of the Journal 'Biomedical chemistry, Chief Editor of the Nanoproteomics section.More than 350 publications in medical press, author of 6 monographs, he is a supervisor of 60 Ph.D. thesises, adviser of 15 doctoral thesises.

Speaker
Alexander Archakov / Institute of Biomedical Chemistry,Russian Federation

Abstract

We present an optoelectronic switch for functional plasmonic circuits based on active control of Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs) at degenerate PN+-junction interfaces. Self-consistent multi-physics simulations of the electromagnetic, thermal and IV characteristics of the device have been performed. The lattice matched Indium Gallium Arsenide (In0.53Ga0.47As) is identified as the best semiconductor material for the practical implementation of the optoelectronic switch providing high optical confinement, reduced system size and fast operation. The optimal device is shown to operate at signal modulation surpassing -100dB and switching rates up to 50GHz, thus potentially providing a new pathway toward bridging the gap between electronic and photonic devices.

Biography

Dr.Dentcho A. Genov is a John J. Cordaro/ Entergy LPand L/NOPSI Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering and the Director of the Center for Applied Physics Studies (CAPS) at Louisiana Tech University. Dr. Genov holds PhD and MS degrees in Electrical Engineering and Aerospace Engineering from Purdue University (USA) and MS degrees in Optics and Theoretical Physics from New Mexico State University (USA) and Sofia University (Bulgaria). Before joining the faculty at Louisiana Tech University, he was an Associate Researcher at the NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center at the University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California, USA. Dr. Genov research interests are in nanophotonics, plasmonics, electromagnetic theory and material science. He has published three book chapters and more than 80 peer reviewed papers and conference proceedings in leading journals such as Nature, Nature Physics,Nature Photonics and Physical Review Letters. His research on metamaterials, cloaking and optical black holes has been extensively featured in the US and foreign media, including on CNN, BBC,The Huffington Post, Scientific American, etc.

Speaker
Dentcho Genov / Louisiana Tech University, USA

Abstract

Many studies are reported about preparation method of nanoparticles, whereas few studies are reported abut preservation nanoparticles. Researcher did not address the problem because freeze-drying is very excellent method till now. However, this is outstanding method because freeze-drying has not been sufficiently discussed. In the present study, we focus on freeze-drying and normal-drying method. Trisaccharides, tetrasaccharides, and pentasaccharides were added to the nanoparticle suspensions, followed by rehydration of the samples, which had been either dried normally or freeze-dried. The particle size after rehydration each sample at that time was then measured. In addition, each saccharide was measured using a powder X-ray diffractometer and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) device. We studied the association between the nanoparticles aggregation and the crystal form of saccharides and their mechanisms by using the obtained results of the data of particle size, powder X-ray pattern, and DSC curves.The relationship between degrees of the nanoparticles aggregation and degree of crystallization are gradually figured out. By continuing this research, the saccharide additives map for preservation nanoparticles will be drawn.

Biography

Dr. Seitaro Kamiya has his expertise in evaluation and passion in improving the pharmaceutics and pharmaceutical technology. He focuses on increasing the efficiency of nanoparticles preservation and also demonstrating the association between nanoparticles and saccharides. He dedicates his effort to create oral formulation of nanoparticles. In addition, his chief concern is to elucidate the mechanism of association between nanoparticles and saccharides.

Speaker
Seitaro Kamiya / Nagasaki International University, Japan

Abstract

Au/TiO2(110) surfaces display extremely high catalytic reactivity [1]. There are many representative models that explain the emerging catalytic activity of Au nanoclusters. It is widely accepted that the perimeter interface of Au/TiO2 is the reaction site for CO oxidation. However, the injection/extraction mechanism of electrons and the reaction process are not clarified by a comprehensive experimental description. In this study, we proposed a new method to simultaneously measuring topography, local contact potential difference (LCPD) and dipole moment distribution on TiO2(110) surface. In the experiment, the DC bias added with ac bias voltage is applied between the tip and sample. Three lock-in amplifiers are used to detect frequency shift of fm , f2m and f3m . The contact potential difference is numerically calculated from the divided result of f2m and fm signals [2, 3] and dipole moment is obtained from frequency shift of f3m. We simultaneously measure the topography, LCPD and dipole moment images on TiO2(110) surface. The details will be reported in the meeting.

Biography

Yanjun Li has completed his PhD from University of Tsukuda, Japan and postdoctoral studies from Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, National Research Institutes, Japan. She is Associate Professor, Department of Applied Physics, Osaka University, , Japan. She has published more than 80 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Speaker
Yanjun Li / Osaka University, Japan

Abstract

The reported related literature determines the degradation of phenolic compounds mostly using Zero or one dimensional nanomaterials (nano particles & rods). The catalytic response was not suitable enough to produce analytical promising catalyst. Currently, research interest has been shifted to 2 D nano materials due to their relatively larger surface area and active morphological features. Since up to now ether limited or no enough study has been done for the catalytic degradation of phenol using 2-D nanostructutres of CuO prepared via template assisted method, the proposed study explore the potential of newly selected green amino acids to produce morphologies which can selectively degrade phenol from any mixtutre of compounds, Hence the Tryptophan, Aspartic acid and Arginine are considered as a green Amino acids and they have been examined to assist the growth of coper oxide nano materials. Their growths were developed on low temperature hydrothermal methods. The different morphology structures are obtained which indicated 2- D CuO with benefit of bio – compatible templates of said amino acids. The obtained product are characterized by XRD, FTIR, Uv- vsible-NIR and SEM techniques. Finally attempts are made to apply for solving phenol degradation and its removal problems.

Biography

will be updated soon!!!

Speaker
Naveed Ali Mastoi / University of Sindh, Pakistan

Sessions:

scientific sessions

Abstract

Phospholipids, especially phosphatidylcholine, are very commonly used in medicine as a drug delivery systems: most investigated of them are liposomes. The aim of work was the use of phospholipid micelles rather liposomes as drug delivery systems and as drugs themselves. To obtain the phospholipid micelles are extremely small size we used homogenization under high pressure, ultrafiltration and freeze-drying. Phosphogliv is Russian original drug, which includes the phospholipid micelles with a size of 30-50 nm in diameter with incorporated glycyrrhizinic acid, which possesses weak detergent properties and the ability to induce the synthesis of ƴ-interferon was used for the treatment of liver diseases including viral hepatitis (B and C). Phosphogliv exists on pharmaceutical Russian market with volume of ~ 30 millions of dollars. Nowdays the other phospholipids micelles with size of 15-25 nm in diameter without glycyrrhizinic acid were produced for improvement of reverse cholesterol transport and normalization of lipid metabolism. Phospholipid micelles as drug delivery system are biodegradable, biologically inert, do not cause allergic, antigenic, or pyrogenic reaction. The new technology was created to produce phospholipid micelles with particles diameter 15-25 nm, in the form of lyophilic powder, which is stable at storage. The main principles of incorporation of pharmacologicaly active substances such as doxorubicine. arbidole, rifampicine etc. into phospholipid micelles considerably increased their bioavailability and therapeutic efficiency.

Biography

Dr.Alexander I Archakov is the Director of the V.N. Orekhovich Institute of Biomedical Chemistry of RAMS and Full member of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences (RAMS).He is a member of the International Scientific Committee on Microsomes & Drug Oxidation, on Biophysics and Biochemistry of the Cytochrome P450, Council member of the International Human Proteome Organization (HUPO), Member of the European Academy of Sciences, member of the European Society of Biochemical Pharmacology and Biochemical Society of Great Britain; member of the IUBMB and New York Academy of Science, Chief Editor of the Journal 'Biomedical chemistry, Chief Editor of the Nanoproteomics section.More than 350 publications in medical press, author of 6 monographs, he is a supervisor of 60 Ph.D. thesises, adviser of 15 doctoral thesises.

Speaker
Alexander Archakov / Institute of Biomedical Chemistry, Russian Federation

Abstract

The electrical conductance of nanostructures within the atomic size is changed stepwise as a function of the cross section area of a nanostructure at its narrowest point[1]. The effect of quantization of electrical conductance (resistance) with the quantum G0 = 2e2/h = (12.9k)-1 occurs for nano-structures under the conditions given by Landauer in his new definition of conductance [2]: that the nanostructure is made of electrical conductor; that the nanostructure (sample) has a constriction (narrow throat) between two wide terminals; that the thickness of the nanostructure is comparable with the Fermi wavelength F; and that the length of the constriction is smaller than the mean free path lein sample material. This effect can be used to measure the width Wof nanostructures (samples), or rather to estimate it - see Fig. 1. Electrical measurements of geometric sizes of nanostructures are potentially very important for nanotechnology, where other methods of measurement are very complex. One such possible method is STM microscopy. The new method here proposed is based on electrical measurements. Therefore, the measurements are relatively simple and the results of measurement are more accurate when nanostructures is smaller

Biography

Waldemar Nawrocki is Full Professor at Poznan University of Technology,Poland. His field of research includes quantum metrology, cryoelectronics: low noise amplifiers,sensors and distributed measurement systems. He received his PhD in 1981 at Poznan University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Poland.

Speaker
Waldemar Nawrocki / Poznan University of Technology, Poland

Abstract

Since 1970 two material groups have been identified capable to form a mechanically stable and functional interface with bone. One group consisted of certain soda-lime-silica glasses, which are exhibiting bone bonding ability (defined as “the bioactivity is the characteristics of an implant material which allows it to form a bond with living tissues”). Another material found to exhibit the bone–bonding ability was machined titanium. The phenomenon of attachment to bone was named osseointegration (defined as “osseointegration represents the formation of a direct contact of a material with bone without intermediate fibrous tissue layer, when observed using light microscope”). Bio-chemical bonding is related to bioactivity, which existence, however, has often been questioned because there is not a clear evidence of separated effects of surface roughness and interfacial chemical reactions. The bioactivated surface, which is rich in hydroxyl groups, rapidly induces adsorption of calcium and phosphate ions on contact with the ions of the blood plasma. The calcium phosphate-rich layer promotes adsorption and concentration of proteins and constitutes a suitable substrate for the first apatite structures of the bone matrix, which are synthesized by the osteogenic cells at the beginning of the formation of the new bone tissue. This implies that implant surface and tissue interface is a critical zone, where tissue responses are mainly dictated by processes controlled at the nanoscale. Current prospects for nanotechnology and biomaterials in medical application appear to be excellent with promising potential for further improving. One of them should be nanoscale functionalization and coating for faster osseointegration of implants. In particular, nano scale science and engineering have accelerated development of drug and gene delivery systems, contrast agents, nanofibrous scaffolds, nanoporous membranes, immune-isolation devices and many others. Carbon nanomaterials like graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes and nanodiamonds have attracted great attention for their vast potential regarding applications as biomaterials. Most allotropic forms of nanocarbon, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes were identified as moderately toxic to living cells. Also, carbon nanomaterials are able to demonstrate antibacterial properties. However, antibacterial activity is strongly related to the surface chemistry which defines degree of hydrophobicity and/or oxidation power. In general, the surface pretreatment and dispersion state of all nanocarbon materials are crucial parameters for effective application such as antibacterial fabrics, wound healing materials, antibacterial graphene-based paper or substrates utilized for disinfection and microbial control.

Biography

Dr.Jaroslav Šesták is an honorary citizen of Prague, an emeritus researcher at the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and a professor at the Center for New Technologies, West Bohemian University in Pilsen. He holds the highest honors of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Heyrovsky Medal 2000) and of the Czech Chemical Society (Hanuš Medal 1998) as well as international awards such as Kurnakov Medal (USSR 1985 and Russia 2015), Bodenheimer Medal (Israel 1987), Patras Medal (Greece 2007) or the Netzsch Awards (Germany 2014). Recently he received supreme state award 2017 by the president of the Czech Republic. He became the guarantor of a number of institutions such as the School of Energy Science of Kyoto University in Japan, the Faculty of Humanities at the Charles University in Prague and the Czech Department of the American University of New York in Prague, where he lectured for twenty years on an interdisciplinary subject "On the Crossroads of Science and Philosophy of Nature". He is a founding member of the journals Thermochimica Acta (Elsevier, 1969), J. Mining and Metallurgy (Bor, 1996) and Int. J. Applied Glass Research (Wiley, 2009). He wrote three hundred expert papers, delivered hundreds of professional and popularizing lectures and in the year 2000 he was among the 20 best cited Czech physicists (thermodynamics). He has been involved in the emergence of new scientific disciplines such as kinetic phase diagrams, glass-forming theory, inorganic bioadaptibility, economical thermodynamics, generalized thermal analysis scheme in climatology or non-isothermal kinetics, where his Sestak-Berggren equation is cited more than a thousand times. He is the author and editor of fifteen books, which he often edited graphically, supplemented by photographs, and where he also designed their covers. His triptych on thermal physics published by Springer in the series “Hot topics of thermal analysis” was ranked between the Springer best twenty books.

Speaker
Jaroslav Šesták / West Bohemian University, Czech Republic

Abstract

Polymer solar cells (PSCs) have demonstrated their potential for photovoltaic devices fabrication with power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) now reaching values over 10% (Vohra et al. Nature Photonics, 2015). However, their active layers are generally prepared by spin-coating from chlorinated solutions which are harmful to the environment and the human health. Here, we introduce two alternative approaches which considerably reduce the amount of chlorinated solvent used during active layer deposition while maintaining relatively high PCEs. The first strategy is based on an alternative deposition process called push-coating (Vohra et al., ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2017): when poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is deposited on top of a few microliters of polymer solution, the solution spreads over the desired area through capillary forces to produce uniform thin active layers. This deposition process uses 20 times less chlorinated solvent as compared to spin-coating and generates no active material waste. We fabricated PSCs with PCEs over 5% using push-coating and expect to reach 10% in a near future. The second approach uses specifically designed block copolymers in which a conjugated electron-donor is covalently bond to a water-soluble polymer. Through a water-based miniemulsion process, electrically active conjugated polymer (electron-donor) – fullerene derivative (electron-acceptor) blend nanoparticles are formed and used as active layers in PSCs with average PCEs of 2.5%. Through these promising strategies, we could produce low-cost, eco-friendly and efficient PSCs. Consequently, our research results fulfill the main requirements for PSC commercialization and open the path to industrial development of these renewable energy devices.

Biography

Varun VOHRA has completed his PhD from the University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy and carried out his postdoctoral studies at the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Japan. He is the director of VOHRA laboratory at the University of Electro-Communications, Japan, and his current research projects focus on organic electronic devices (PSCs and OLEDs), light manipulation using nanostructures and photonic papers. He has published more than 25 papers in high impact journals and has been serving as scientific committee member of various international conferences in the field of advanced functional materials.

Speaker
Varun Vohra / University of Electro-Communications, Japan

Abstract

Adsorption of Pb2+ onto phosphoric acid modified ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC)was investigated with variations of the parameters such as pH, contact time, temperature, and initial concentration. Optimum Pb2+adsorption was observed at pH of 5. Modified OMC were characterized by Nitrogen Adsorption-Desorption Isotherm, SEM, TEM, FT-IR, Boehm Titration, and Elemental Analysis. The time required to reach equilibrium was between 20 mins and 30 mins. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of MOMC-NP was found to be 56.1, 68.8, and 77.8 mgg-1 at an initial concentration of 60, 80, and 100 mg L-1of Pb2+ respectively. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of modified OMC (MOMC-NP) increased with the increase of temperature indicating that the process of Pb2+adsorption is an endothermic process. Isotherm studies suggested that the experimental data better fitted to Langmuir isotherm model. Additionally,kinetics studies suggested the adsorption can be best described by the pseudo second order model. The results also indicated that the modified finite-bath diffusion model fitted the experiments very well, with a diffusion coefficient of 9.99×10-3 cm2 s-1 for the product of the distribution coefficient and the effective diffusivity in the adsorption of Pb2+on the MOMC-NP.

Biography

Dr. Daniel Gang is currently a full professor and graduate coordinator in Department of Civil Engineering at University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He is the founding director of the Center of Environmental Engineering and Protection (CEEP) at UL. He earned his PhD from University of Missouri. His research has focused on physicochemical treatment of water and wastewater and environmental chemistry, fate and transport of contaminants in engineered and natural aqueous systems. He has been actively involved in numerous research projects funded by NSF, NASA, USEPA, DOE and state agencies with over $6 million in grants and contracts.

Speaker
Daniel Gang / University of Louisiana at Lafayette, USA

Abstract

One of the biggest mysteries in modern physics is that antimatter seems to have been disappeared from the Universe. According to the standard model of physics, there should have been equal amount of matter and antimatter produced in the Big Bang. However, we don't see any trace of antimatter, at least in the observable Universe. One possible explanation is that CPT -symmetry, the corner stone of the standard model, is somehow violated. The ALPHA -experiment, situated at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator, has now developed a direct way to precisely address this question. This is done by comparing the properties of hydrogen atom to its anti-world counterpart, antihydrogen. The most recent findings by the collaboration indicate that antihydrogen behaves similarly to hydrogen, in precision less than one part of billion [1]. However, properties of hydrogen have been measured five orders of magnitude beyond this. ALPHA is currently aiming to improve precision of the measurements of antihydrogen to see if there are any statistically observably differences in the properties in these two atoms. In this talk, a review of recent progress, along with methods to create neutral antimatter, how to trap it, how to diagnose and detect it, is given. A review of the progress in the field of low energy antimatters physics will also be discussed.

Biography

Petteri Pusa received he’s PhD in the University of Helsinki Accelerator Laboratory (2004) in the field applications of theoretical nuclear physics methods in ion beam analysis targeting in materials science research.He further developed these techniques to study various semiconductor materials, especially for high luminosity experiments in high energy physics. From 2006 he joined University of Liverpool, part of CERN’s ALPHA collaboration as a team leader for developing and commissioning of dedicated annihilation detectors for the purpose of this experiment.

Speaker
Petteri Pusa / University of Liverpool, UK

Abstract

In the last few years, we have fabricated metallic coatings with nanocolumnar morphology by means of glancing angle deposition with sputtering [1-3]. This technique allows for obtaining nanostructured coatings onto any kind of flat substrates and it can be scaled up to large areas. Moreover, it is energetically efficient and environmentally friendly, since it takes place at room temperature in one single step and no chemicals are involved (thus without recycling problems). Depending on the deposition parameters (such as gas pressure, tilt angle, substrate rotation, etc.), the nanocolumnar structure can be controlled, giving rise to different properties [4]. In particular, for gold coatings we have obtained specific optical properties related to the existence of localized surface plasmons associated to the nanopillars. When vertical nanocolumns are produced by using substrate rotation and high tilt angle, the coatings show black metal behaviour in the visible range [5], with reflectivity below 10% in the 400-700 nm range. On the other hand, when short tilted nanocolumns are fabricated, hot spots of electromagnetic field develop and provide a strong enhancement of the fluorescence or Raman signals. As a result, this is a low cost approach to prepare SERS substrates by a physical vapour deposition technique.

Biography

Jose Miguel Garcia-Martin obtained his PhD at the Complutense University (Madrid, Spain) and spent three years as a Marie Curie postdoctoral fellow at the Paris-Sud University (France). Currently he is Research Scientist of the Spanish Research Council (CSIC) at the Institute of Micro and Nanotechnology (Madrid), where he is the Head of the Department of Fabrication and Characterization of Nanostructures. Dr. Jose leads the projects entitled "Large area advanced materials based on nanopillars and nanoparticles" and "Nanoimplant", which won the IDEA²Madrid Award (a partnership of the Regional Government and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT).He have been a Fulbright Scholar at Northeastern University (Boston, USA)and co-authored 74 articles and have given 22 invited conferences.

Speaker
Jose Miguel Garcia-Martin / CNM-CSIC, Spain

Abstract

The brain presents the inherent capability to extract useful and compact information from huge amounts of unreliable data. This is performed with extreme power efficiency, fault tolerance, compactness and the ability to learn and adapt the internal processing to the changing environment. Neuromorphic Computing is the science field that tries to reproduce those amazing capabilities, thus creating a large variety of complex applications as efficient data-mining, complex pattern recognition systems or temporal series forecasting. In this context, the hardware implementation of neural systems arises as one of the today's most challenging tasks for science and technology due to its inherent capability to faithfully replicate the brain's massive parallelism. In this presentation I will describe the most recent methodologies and techniques used to implement massive in-silico neural systems and present an overview of its possible applications. The natural brain language, based on the processing and transmission of action potentials (spikes) through the network, will be analyzed and adapted to the in-silico world. Then, the basic building blocks to implement the spike processing will be presented and adapted for its massive replication. A basic low-cost digital architecture optimized to be implemented Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) along with their practical measured results will be presented and analyzed. Also, I will present the most powerful neural architectures oriented to different applications as the Reservoir Computing scheme for temporal data processing or Deep Neural Networks for pattern recognition. Finally, different real-life applications will be shown as real-time temporal series forecasting or the data mining of huge databases.

Biography

Josep L. Rossello got his PhD in 2002 in Physics from the Balearic Islands University. He is an Associated Professor in Electronic Technology at the Balearic Islands University (Spain) from 2002. His main research interests are on pattern recognition, hardware implementation of neural systems, and data mining. He has published dozens of research papers in reputed international journals and conferences with hundreds of citations (H=16) and has licensed several patents to different companies.

Speaker
Josep L. Rossello / Balearic Islands University, Spain

Abstract

Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the topological dependence of polymer brush. Both ring and starlike polymer brushes are investigated, and a comparison with those of linear polymer brush is also made. It is found that there exists a master scaling power law of the totalstretching energy scaled by chain length, for moderate chain length regime, for ring polymerbrushes, but with a larger exponent than 5/6, indicating an influence of topological constraint to thedynamic properties of the system. We also investigate the structural properties of binary polymer brushes, composed of functional 4-armed star polymers and chemically identical linear polymers of different molecular weights. The molecular dynamics simulations confirm recent self-consistent field studies, in which a considerable potential of these systems for the design of switchable surfaces has been claimed. The length of the linear chains serves as a control parameter, which, while passing over a critical value, induces a sharp transition of the molecular conformation. These transitions at different grafting densities are studied and summarized in a phase diagram. Keywords: polymer brush, topological dependence, starlike, ring, binary

Biography

Dr.Chen-Xu Wu is professor and chair professor at Department of Physics, Xiamen University,PR China.He is an Organizing committee member of China physical society (CPS) Fall meeting since 2006 and science steering committee member(2007-2010) Institute of complex adaptive matter, University of California at Santa Barbara . ChenXu's research interest is soft condensed matter physics.

Speaker
Chen-Xu Wu / Xiamen University, China

Abstract

Corrosion is the gradual destruction of metals by chemical or electrochemical reaction with their environment.Prevention of corrosion is necessary to ensure the safe and fail-free working of any machine component.Stainless steel though having an inherent corrosion resistive property, is prone to corrosion in chloride containing environments like sea water. Studies reveal that ceramic oxides like ZrO2, Al2O3 and TiO2 in their nano structured form offer superior corrosion resistance when coated over the parent material. However, the effect of multilayered nano structured ceramic composites on the corrosion mitigation of stainless steel is relatively less explored. In this work, the effect of multi-layered nano structured ZrO2-TiO2ceramic composite on the corrosion inhibition of SS 304 austenitic stainless steel is studied. The experiments were designed using the Taguchi methodology of design of experiments. The structural and morphological characterization of the coating was carried out through X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopic analyses respectively. The thickness of the coating was measured using a coordinate measuring machine. The corrosion performances of the coating in 0.5 M NaCl were evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarization measurements. The results indicated tangible improvement in the corrosion resistance for the coated specimens by as much as 67% compared with the uncoated specimen. The morphology and thickness of the coating was found to influence the corrosion resistance. The resistance to corrosion was found more for a homogenous coating with higher thickness and vice versa. Further, statistical analyses such as signal to noise ratio and analysis of variance were performed to identify the optimum parameter combination yielding the highest corrosion resistance. Keywords:Corrosion, Sol-Gel, Nanostructured composites, ZrO2, TiO2, Taguchi Method, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Potenti Dynamic Polarization.

Biography

Dr. Sreejith Mohan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sree Buddha College of Engineering, India.His areas of research interests include, welding, occupational safety and health, emission analysis, corrosion, mathematical modeling and vibration analysis. He has published his research findings in five peer-reviewed international journals. His doctoral thesis was on the reduction of fume emissions from shielded metal arc welding process through nano coating of electrodes.

Speaker
Sreejith Mohan / Sree Buddha College of Engineering,India

Abstract

Coupling the versatility of the design offered by the screen printed technology and the benefit of the magnetic beads (MBs) gives us rapid and sensitive immunodetection. Using this strategy, finding the optimum conditions for the immunoassay on the magnetic beads and for electrochemical detection on multiplex screen printed electrodes (SPEs) is much easier than in the usual surface modification methods. Magnetic beads have been used in immunoassay formats. Modifications can be done separately from SPEs. This gives an advantage for us to get rid of the effect of immobilization steps on electrodes. After doing immunoassay protocol, MBs can be held onto a sensor surface by a magnetic field. The current proportional to analyte concentration can be generated by injecting a solution containing a substrate (ABTS, ATCh, etc.) for the enzyme (HRP, AChE, etc) label and using a potential to electrolyze the enzyme product. In the case of the electrochemical assay, it is essential that the enzymatic product is electroactive so that it can be measured through amperometric technique. This configuration is an attractive alternative method, especially for automation of analytical biosystems. This review focuses on two magnetic bead-based immunosensors. First is the detection of opioid active peptide, beta-casomorphin-7 (BCM-7) in bovine milk by competitive immunosensor. The second is the detection of deltamethrin and malathion pesticides from larvae of Tribolium confusum extracts, by using Acetylcholinesterase based amperometric immunosensor on screen printed electrodes (SPE).

Biography

Dr. Ebru Saatçi, Female, Biochemist, graduated from Medical Biosciences, 9 Eylül University in 1994. She worked for Erciyes University between 1994-1996 in Biology Department and in Middle East Technical University between 1999-2006. She got PhD degree from Biochemistry in METU at 2005. She worked as a postdoctoral researcher in Chemistry Department, Kemicentrum, Lund University, Sweden between 2007-2008. She is working on capacitive enzyme biosensors, amperometric immunosensors. Now she is Assistant Prof. in Biology Department, Erciyes University., Kayseri, Turkey.

Speaker
Ebru Saatçi / Erciyes University, Turkey

Abstract

Present study was conducted to establish the interaction of bovine fetuin-A to validate its binding modalities with doxorubicin (Dox). Fetuin-A was purified to highest purity and monodispersity. Green synthesis of fetuin-A conjugated gold nanoparticles (F-GNPs) has been performed giving typical UV-maxima with subtle variation in fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed spherical shaped, polydisperse F-GNPs of varying sizes, complementing the radius of hydration (19.5–62.4 nm) by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Circular dichroism (CD) analysis of fetuin-A with respect to Dox interaction shows remarkable reduction in ellipticity with increasing concentrations of Dox (20–120uM). Fetuin-A:Dox and F-GNPs:Dox at variable concentrations revealed significantly enhanced absorption spectra, while a continuous decrease in florescence (560 nm). This effect was more drastic when Dox interact with fetuin-A as compared to F-GNPs. Some known antimicrobial drugs were also investigated under similar conditions, giving strong quenching effect in a dose dependent man-ner suggesting the significant yet differential interactions. In cytotoxicity assay, fetuin-A:Dox conjugates revealed less toxicity as compared to F-GNPs:Dox and Dox alone. In-silico studies of the fetuin-A:Dox complex suggest that the drug binds in the major grove between beta-sheet and long loop region of D1 domain and stabilized by several hydrogen bonds.

Biography

Dr. Iqra Munir is currently working as a Research Fellow at International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Karachi. She holds her PhD in Biochemistry from H.E.J Research Institute of Chemistry, International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Karachi. Over the past 6 years, she has so far published 7 research articles in internationally peer reviewed journals and 2 abstracts in National and International Conferences. Her specialization is protein chemistry and how protein can be used as therapeutics to subside the organic drugs. Her current research focus includes utilization of protein nanoconjugates and nanoparticles as a drug delivery vehicle to bring alternative cure for life threatening disease. Importantly, one of her recent research paper received earliest publication rate on 123 List of Hottest Articles, Elsevier B.V. Also, she is receiving invitations to be a part of reviewer team form different reputed journals including SciRes Literature LLC. member Journals.

Speaker
Iqra Munir / HEJ Research Institute of Chemistry, Pakistan

Abstract

Pharmaceuticals emerging in the aquatic ecosystems have become an important public health issue over the past few years. To evaluate the impact of those pharmaceuticals in drinking water the World Health Organization already reviewed scientific evidence to address this issue. They are mostly introduced in the sewage system through excretion of unmetabolized compounds after medical use or inappropriate disposal and then transported into the wastewater treatment plants. Due to low removal levels in conventional wastewater treatment plants, there is a need to develop technologies that promote an easier degradation of these pollutants. Among various treatment technologies, advanced oxidation process with nanotechnology has become very popular and demonstrated high effectiveness in the degradation of pharmaceuticals in water and wastewater. Semiconductor photocatalytic oxidation technology has several merits such as green, environmental protection and high efficiency, which draws great interests in the aspect of environmental pollution control. In our laboratory, we developed various nanostructured materials such as zinc oxide (ZnO), Cerium doped ZnO, cadmium sulfide (CdS) microsphere and indium sulfide (In2S3) nanoflower by adopting various synthetic techniques such as solution phase, hydrothermal, solvothermal and microwave assisted method for water and wastewater treatment. In order to understand the physical properties of the prepared materials, the structure and morphology of the prepared products were characterized by X-ray power diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDX), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Various pharmaceuticals such as acetaminophen, levofloxacin and nizatidine were used as pollutants to investigate the photocatalytic activity of the prepared nanostructured materials.The mineralization of pharmaceuticals over nanostructured materials by photocatalytic degradation has been investigated in this study. We observed that more than 95% of pharmaceuticals (acetaminophen, levofloxacin and nizatidine (5mg/L, 100 ml) has been mineralized within 4 h of photocatalytic reaction. The influence of operating parameters on the degradation has also been evaluated systematically. A number of findings were: (1) optimal loading of the photocatalyst is 1 g/L; (2) the mineralization of pharmaceuticals over nanostructured materials and (3) the mineralization process was decreased with increasing initial concentration. These indicate that enough reaction site and appropriate circumstance accelerate the mineralization of pharmaceuticals over nanomaterials.Further, the development of photocatalytic reactor and application of Green Nanotechnology for the degradation of pharmaceuticals containing wastewater will be discussed during my lecture.

Biography

Dr. RENGARAJ Selvaraj is an Assistant Professor in the Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman with responsibility for teaching, research and consultancy in the field of Analytical and Applied Environmental Chemistry. Dr. Rengaraj graduated from Anna University, Madras, India with a Ph.D in Chemistry in 1999. He has 20 years of research experience in Environmental Science and Engineering, particularly in the area of Environmental Nanotechnology, wastewater treatment, water quality analysis, and solid waste management. He has published more than 85 research articles in reputed National, International Journals, and Proceedings (h-index 25) and has been serving as an editorial board member of two International Journals. He has participated and presented his research papers in several National and International conferences. Dr. Rengaraj is having more than 15 years post Ph.D experience as Marie Curie Experienced Research Fellow, Visiting Professor, Brain Pool Scientist, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Contract Professor, and Visiting Scientist at different International Universities, United Nation University pilot program and Research Institutes at Finland, France, Oman, South Korea and Hong Kong. Dr. Rengaraj has been elected as one of the board of directors for Pacific Basin Consortium for Environment and Health. At present, he is actively involving in the area of synthesis, characterization and application of nano-structured photocatalysts for the removal of endocrine disruptor chemicals, toxic organics, pharmaceuticals, NOx and heavy metals from water and wastewater. In addition, he is Member of American Chemical Society, Royal Society of Chemistry and several International Scientific committee

Speaker
RENGARAJ SELVARAJ / Sultan Qaboos University, Oman

Abstract

Large scalable application of graphene is highly desirable for technological applications. In the last few decades, graphene oxide (GO) has been considered as a promising material for mass production of chemically derived graphene. Since GO contains a wide range of functional group attached to its basal plane and edges, it helps in opening up a band gap in graphene as well as to tune its mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. GO has emerged as a multifunctional material and its being widely studied in context of applications such as sensors, biomedical application, field effect transistor and environmental remediation. In this study we report a scalable, inexpensive approach for production of GO and reduced GO without using any expensive filtration membrane (filters). GO formed by our technique has been used for demonstrating applications in environmental remediation, solar cell and sensing. In addition a control to oxygen functional groups (OFGs) has been discussed and the corresponding magnetic properties have been investigated.

Biography

Dr.Pranay Ranjan is research scholar (Ph.D) in Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Patna. He completed his undergraduate (B.Tech) degree from Dr. M.G.R University in Electronics and Communication Engineering (Honours ECE, 2011) and then joined "Vidyadaan Institute of Technology and Management" as a Lecturer till end of 2012. He started his research (Ph.D.) career in 2013 at IIT Patna and has published 8 conference proceedings (AIP and Materials Today Proc.), 2 peer reviewed journals namely "Journal of Raman Spectroscopy" and "Small". His area of expertise is synthesis of 2D materials and its application in sensing and environmental remediation. He reported for the first time alpha lead oxide: A new 2D material for visible light sensing in 2018.

Speaker
Pranay Ranjan / Indian Institute of Technology Patna, India

Sessions:

Abstract

Supercritical fluid synthesis offers a unique method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles such as titanium dioxide (nano-titania). The synthesis route has the advantage of producing high quality nanoparticles with good crystallinity and discreet, small size distribution (i.e. diameter of the particle). Moreover, supercritical fluid synthesis can provide precise control over the elemental composition of the produced nanoparticles. Such a comprehensive set of characteristics, however, is not easily obtained with other methods of nanoparticle production. In addition to its technical advantages, this synthesis pathway proceeds quickly (e.g. ≤ 1 minute) and at moderate reaction temperatures (e.g. ≤ 400°C). The reduced reaction times and lower reaction temperatures is assumed to reduce energy consumption compared with other modes of nanoparticle production. Consequently, supercritical fluid synthesis offers a potential, environmentally preferred means of producing metal oxide nanoparticles such as nano-titania. In this presentation, we present the results of an anticipatory, cradle-to-gate life-cycle assessment for the production of dry nano-titania powder. The functional unit of the study is 1 kg of nano-titania and includes the life-cycle stages of material extraction, material processing and manufacturing of the nanomaterial. This study excludes any use or end-of-life considerations. The life-cycle inventory and life-cycle impact assessment results are further compared to a more conventional precipitation method for producing nano-titania as well as the production of bulk sized titania (i.e. non-nanoparticles). Nanomaterials are an emerging technology with elevated levels of uncertainty regarding their modes of production and the average amounts of materials and energy consumed for production, for example. This is because processes such as supercritical synthesis are still very much a lab-scale and early-stage production technology, and thus their operating parameters are likely to change significantly as the technology scales to the industrial-level. To account for this, a Monte-Carlo analysis approach was used to compare the environmental and human health impact results of the various synthesis pathways. The pedigree approach (Weidema and Wesnaes) was used to defined log-normal distributions for the foreground inventory data used in the synthesis pathways.ReCiPe 2008 midpoint (H) impacts, Ecoinvent 3.2 (Allocation), and openLCA 1.5 used to complete the assessment. The supercritical fluid synthesis of nano-titania involved mixing titanium isopropoxide (at 2.0 M) with a 1:1 molar ethanol and water mixture at 400⁰C and 23 MPa.The assessment assumes production conditions that would simulate a large-scale scenario. This includes the use of many prospective life-cycle inventory data such as a high concentration of precursor (at 2.0 M), recycling of the solvent (at a rate of 86%), co-production of isopropanol and energy consumption for auxiliary processes (e.g. pumps, filtering, drying) typical of an average large scale production facility. The precipitation of nano-titaniawas followed as outlined in Hischier et al. 2015, involving the precipitation of nano-titania from titanium oxysulfate in solution. Preliminary results demonstrate that supercritical fluid synthesis has the potential to reduce environmental and human health impacts compared with the precipitation method of producing nano-titania. At a 95%-confidence level, 12 out of the 19 environmental and human health impacts werelower compared to the precipitation method. For instance, the mean values for climate change potential and particulate matter formation were nearly 70% and 80% lower, respectively, for supercritical fluid synthesis compared with precipitation. However, the mean photochemical oxidant formation value for supercritical fluid synthesis was 35% lower than precipitation but not statistically significant at a 95%-confidence level. A significant proportion of the environmental and human health impacts for supercritical fluid synthesis seem to be driven by the production of the precursor titanium isopropoxide. Its average contribution to the overall set of impacts was 25% and ranged from a low of 9% for marine eutrophication to a high of 40% for human toxicity. The results of this life-cycle assessment demonstrate the potential resource efficiencies and environmental and human health hazards posed by the supercritical fluid synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles such as nano-titania. However, results should be met with caution as life-cycle inventories for these synthesis pathways have important sources of uncertainty in their life-cycle inventories due to a lack of available manufacturing data and low economies-of-scale. Furthermore, the two nano-synthesis pathways outlined in this study produce nanoparticles that have different physico-chemical properties such as their crystallinity and inherent particle size distribution. The results for this life-cycle assessment that both synthesis routes produced nanoparticles of the same physico-chemical characteristics. It is assumed that supercritical synthesis will ultimately show to have a product with greater crystallinity and small, discreet size range, lending themselves to more advanced applications and a preferred product from a technological standpoint. Thus, other synthesis routes such as precipitation may require further processing and refining of the nanoparticles before they can be used in certain applications. For this reason, research in this area should focus on the use and end-of-life stages to see how such considerations influence the overall resource efficiencies and environmental and human health impacts involved associated with these synthesis routes.

Biography

Dr.Guido Sonnemann is full professor for sustainablechemistry, life cycle assessment and material management at the Université de Bordeaux, France. His research areas are Life cycle assessment, Green and sustainable chemistry, Nano-science and green catalysis, Sustainable materials and products, Resources and recycling, Sustainable cities, Water footprint,Life cycle toxicity impact assessment. He holds a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University Rovira and Virgili, Spain (2002), M.Sc. in water biology and chemistry from the University of Poitiers, France (1996), and graduated as engineer from the Technical University of Berlin, Germany (1995) with a specialization in environmental engineering. He is author of books, book chapters and scientific articles in the area of life cycle approaches and was former UNEP Programme Officer for Innovation and Life Cycle Management, whereh is work focused on resource efficiency and sustainable consumption and production sub-programme.

Speaker
Guido Sonnemann / Universite de Bordeaux, France

Abstract

Oxidative aging of asphalt is one of the major concerns in the asphalt research field, as aging can lead to the development of distresses like fatigue or thermal cracking in asphalt pavement. Aging in asphalt leads to stiffening and changes in its chemical composition due to predominant oxidation of asphalt binder. However, the amount of oxidation in asphalt concrete (AC) mainly depends on the amount of available voids in AC. The current study attempts to correlate available voids in AC with nanoindentation hardness and viscoelastic relaxation parameter of the material. In the study, AC samples were prepared with increasing order of air voids from 4% to 20% and aged for four years in room temperature and atmospheric condition. Binder of aged AC samples was extracted and recovered using centrifuge and Rotavapor distillation process, respectively. The oxidative aging of asphalt binder samples was quantified using Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of carboxyl and sulfoxide functional groups. Nanoindentation creep behavior was evaluated from the load-displacement behavior and then fitted in the viscoelastic model to quantify the viscoelastic relaxation time parameters. Results show porous AC undergoes more aging compared to a dense one. Oxidation measured for ketones increases linearly with the increase of pore content in AC. Nanoindentation relaxation and retardation time parameters show a significant increase with the increase in effective voids in the AC samples, which means higher air voids in AC causes damage to the binder by reducing its stress-relaxing capacity. The viscoelastic relaxation time of AC sample with 20% airvoids shows 7.5 times increase compared 7% airvoids containing AC sample.

Biography

Dr. Rafi Tarefder is a Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering and a Regent’s Lecturer at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Tarefder has conducted research on a range of pavement engineering problems with emphasis on pavement design, materials, and sustainability. This work has resulted in over 200 refereed publications. Currently, He serves as an Associate Director of two federally funded transportation centers: Southern Plain Transportation Center (SPTC), and Safety and Operations of Large-Area Rural/Urban Intermodal Systems (SOLARIS). He is the Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Advances in Civil and Environmental Engineering, Associate Editor of the ASCE Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering and Lead Editor of IACMAG Newsletter. He has received several awards for his scholarship including the prestigious NSF CAREER award, Regent’s Award, John Booker Excellent Medal.

Speaker
Rafiqul A Tarefder / University of New Mexico, USA

Abstract

Refractive-index determination in parallel-plates made from homogeneous dielectric samples has been widely reported [1] and a method of this type could serve for dispersion inspection. But samples with a given structure (as nanostructures) can often optically behave as homogeneous materials, thus widening the range of applications of methods to include determination of such equivalent refractive-indexes. After trying several well-known alternative techniques [2,4], a simple method based on reflection of the first interface and transmission on the second interface under coherent illumination has emerged and proved to be useful for the task. Because the incident wave is a convergent one, both interfering waves form a non-compensated radial-shear interference pattern. For low numerical apertures and good parallelism (less than 3 milliradians), nearly compensation are achieved and thus Newton rings are formed. An equivalent radius of curvature can be easily calculated from the resulting interferogram [5] and the equivalent refractive-index can thus be calculated. Experimental results are shown applying this technique in some known glasses and liquids. Photorefractive crystals were also inspected with this technique (BGO and LiNbO3), as well as other organic materials.

Biography

G. Rodríguez-Zurita has completed his PhD from Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena (Germany) and did several international research stays. Professor at BUAP in Puebla (México), he has conducted more than 10 experimental projects supported by CONACYT and published more than 70 papers in reputed journals. G. Calderón-Hernández is an Engineering in Mehatronics from Universidad Tecnológica de Puebla and is currently a technical assistant at FCFM-BUAP. N. I. Toto-Arellano has his PhD degree from BUAP and has been a posdoctoral position at Centro de Investigaciones en Óptica from León (Guanajuato, México).

Speaker
G. Rodriguez-Zurita / Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico

Abstract

Understanding dengue virus (DENV)-induced hemorrhage in human has still remained a challenging jigsaw puzzle with many pieces missing to know the complex interactions between DENV and blood coagulation system. To use flow cytometry studying the interactions between DENV and human platelet receptors CD41, CD41a and CD42b, directly conjugated fluorochrome monoclonal antibody (mAb) is essentially needed to facilitate multifluorochromeimmunostaining. However, the obstacle was that no directly conjugated fluorochrome-anti-DENV mAb had been commercially available. To overcome, we directly conjugated fluorochrome to a primary anti-DENV mAb using a LYNX rapid conjugation kit. Fluorescence microscopy as well as flow cytometryclearly demonstratedsimultaneous nanodetection of these platelet receptors superficially and DENV intracellularly. Flow cytometric datathree-dimensionally analyzed bycustom-software in MATLAB showed direct dependence of DENV infection on CD42b and specified CD42b as a key target for DENV infection. Potentially, a new hypothesis of our finding has been originallyproposed that inhibiting DENV entry to its CD42b+ human target cells such as megakaryocytes, platelets and endothelial cells is a challenging strategy to stop human dying from severe dengue.

Biography

Dr.NattapolAttatippaholkun is a MD-PhD scholar of Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital,Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. He received his BSc in Medical Science with the first class honor from Mahidol University. He received his PhD in Molecular Medicine from Mahidol University. He was a postdoctoral researcher at Dana–Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.

Speaker
Nattapol Attatippaholkun / Mahidol University,Bangkok

Abstract

Graphene is a promising material having the potential to be used in a wide range of application areas. Block copolymers (BCPs), on the other hand, have been extensively used in microelectronics industry due to their self-assembly and microphase separation properties. Today, an intensive amount of effort has been made to improve the electronic properties of graphene with the help of the advantages of BCPs. With this aim, microphase separation in PS-b-PMMA systems having different molecular weights has been studied. Solutions of BCPs with 5k-5k, 18k-18k and 20k-50k molecular weights have been used. BCP solution coated Si/SiO2 wafers has been annealed between 3-48 hours. At around 6 hours, microphase separation has been achieved followed by etching procedures. Both wet and dry etch techniques have been studied. Preliminary results obtained after CF4 etching are found to be promising for optimization of graphene band gap. Investigations are being continued.

Biography

Hande Yöndemli has been graduated from Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry and has completed her MSc from Hacettepe University, Polymer Chemistry Division, TURKEY. She is currently studying her PhD at Selcuk University, TURKEY under the supervision of Prof. Mustafa ERSOZ. Her academical interests are synthesis and characterization of Block Copolymers (BCPs), microphase separation, and thermal analyses. Recently, she has been graduated from Selcuk University, Department of Chemical Engineering.

Speaker
Hande Yondemli / Selcuk University,Turkey

Abstract

A review of our achievements in the field of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) synthesis by means of pulse laser vaporization will be presented. A new laser ablation chamber designed for Kr-F excimer laser experiments and a new route for target preparation will be reported. Based on our best knowledge, there is no reported data about the possibility of using only graphite cement for target preparation in such experiments. In our experiments, the use of this graphite precursor has eliminated the need for pressing or hot pressing treatments.[1,2] Comparison in between this new route and the classic one in terms of SWCNTs production will be reported. Statistic results about the influence of different technological parameters on the SWCNTs synthesis will be reported. We will report results about the influence of the ablation target composition on the formation of SWCNTs as well as the influence of the carrier gas used in the experiments. Finally, tuning the target composition as well as the ablation parameters we were able to synthesize SWCNTs, carbon nano-onions and graphene using the same reactor. These studies were done on graphite targets undoped or doped with metallic catalysts such as mono-component dopants such as Co, Ni, Pt or bi-component dopants like Co/Ni or Co/Pt. All reported results are based on morphological and structural characterization performed by Transmission Electron Microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and Thermogravimetric analysis. Finally, will be presented our initial steps in the implementations of the third generation solar cells using SWCNTs we produce.

Biography

Marius Enachescu is a pioneer in Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) technique and has played a major role in implementing STM and related techniques in the 90‘s, with a vast experience in surface chemistry and physics at prestigious institutions in Germany (Technical University of Munich-5 years) and the USA (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, UC Berkeley, California-15 years). He is relatively recently reintegrated in the country of origin, Romania, bringing with him an invaluable expertise in exploiting quantum effects and nano-scale phenomena geared toward developing innovative and competitive technologies, used in applications such as sensors, biosensors, solar cells, MEMS, nano-FETs, micro- and nano-electronics, nano-optics, smart clothing, etc. Professor Dr.rer.nat. Marius Enachescu is the Founder and Chair of the Center for Surface Science and Nanotechnology at University POLITEHNICA Bucharest, where he has been since 2009. He was/is the project leader of Romanian consortium for several European projects, e.g., ENIAC/ECSEL, M-ERA.Net, EuroNanoMed, etc.

Speaker
MARIUS ENACHESCU / University POLITEHNICA Bucharest,Romania

Abstract

This work we first described a spray-recrystallization method to prepare sub-micrometer ADNI and its tested performance. The uniform sub-micrometer ADNI has better sensitivity to short impulse shock waves with the 50% and 99.9% initiation currents at 2.45 kA and 2.67 kA, respectively, which is much better than sub-micrometer LLM-105 (3.11 kA and 3.46 kA, respectively) and DAAF (3.7 kA and 4.75 kA, respectively). Furthermore, ADNI is found to have critical diameters below 3 mm. The detonation velocity for ADNI (7.8 km s−1 at a density of 1.67 g cm−3) is greater than that of LLM-105 (7.54 km s−1 at the density of 1.63 g cm−3) and HNS (6.8 km s−1). ADNI also has a higher decomposition temperature (Td =265.8°C) and a better thermal stability (5S shotpoint of 312°C) with low impact, friction, and electric spark sensitivities (>40 N, >360 N, and 2.20 J). These metrics are comparable to LLM-105 (0-30 N, >360 N, and 1.02 J) and HNS (26 N, 240 N, and 1.77 J). The high stability and good detonation properties of sub-micrometer ADNI is clearly insensitive to impact stimulus and long pulse stimulation, while also being sensitive to short impulse shock waves suggests that it is a promising initiating explosive for slapper detonators.

Biography

will be updated soon!!

Speaker
Yanyang Qu / China Academy of Engineering Physics, China

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