Scientific Program

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Based on the composition of human milk (HM), a special mixture of oligosaccharides containing short chain galacto-oligosaccharides (scGOS) and long chain fructo-oligosaccharides (lcFOS) has been evaluated. In a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 259 healthy term infants with a parental history of atopy were fed to either prebiotic supplemented (0.8 g/100 ml scGOS/lcFOS) or placebo supplemented (0.8 g/100 ml maltodextrin) formula during the first 6 months of life. A total of 102 infants in the prebiotic group and 104 infants in the placebo group completed the study. During the intervention period, 10 infants in the prebiotic group (9.8%) and 24 infants in the placebo group (23.1%) developed atopic dermatitis (AD). Infants in the prebiotic group had also a significantly lower number of infections and antibiotic treatments (1-3). From these infants, 134 (68 in placebo and 66 in intervention group) participated to a 2-year follow-up. Infants in the scGOS/lcFOS group had significantly lower incidence of allergic manifestations, infections, and antibiotic prescriptions (4). Growth was normal and similar in both groups. Among these 134 infants, 92 were followed further for a 5-y period. The 5-y allergy associated symptoms were significantly lower in the scGOS/lcFOS group (4.8% vs 28.0%; p<0.05) (5). It can be concluded that early dietary intervention with oligosaccharide prebiotics in infants at risk of allergy has a protective effect against allergic manifestations and infections. This protective effect lasts beyond the intervention period, until 5 years of life with the achievement of adequate growth. References 1. Moro G, Arslanoglu S, Stahl B, et al: A mixture of prebiotic oligosaccharides reducers the incidence of atopic dermatitis during the first six months of age. Arch Dis Child 91:814-819, 2006 2. Moro G, Arslanoglu S, Boehm G: Reducing the burden of atopic dermatitis. Arch Dis Child 92:655-656, 2007 3. Arslanoglu S, Moro G, Boehm G: Early supplementation of prebiotic oligosacchgarides protects formula fed infants against infections during the first 6 months of life. J Nutr 137; 2420-2424, 2007 4. Arslanoglu S, Moro GE, Schmitt J, et al: Early dietary intervention with a mixture of prebiotic oligosaccharides reduces the incidence of allergic manifestations and infections during the first two years of life. J Nutr 138; 1091-1095, 2008 5. Arslanoglu S, Moro GE, Boehm G, et al: Early neutral prebiotic oligosaccharide supplementation reduces the incidence of some allergic manifestations in the first 5 years of life. JBRHA 26, no.3 (S); 49-59, 2012

Biography

GUIDO E. MORO, has been Professor of Neonatology at the University of Milan, Director of the Centre for Infant Nutrition, and Director of the Department of Neonatal Pathology at Macedonio Melloni Hospital in Milan, Italy. His main field of research is infant nutrition: VLBW infants feeding, human milk, and human milk banks (HMBs). In 1985 he founded the HMB of Milan. He has been the first President of the European Milk Bank Association (EMBA). In 2005 he received the “Gold Medal” from the City of Milan, the highest honour for people working in this city. At present he is the President of the Italian Association of Human Milk Banks, which coordinates the activity of 37 banks.

Speaker
Guido E. Moro / University of Milan, Italy

Sessions:

Scientific Sessions

Abstract

The area around the former Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) is heavily contaminated with radioactive fallout due to more than 456 nuclear tests conducted over a period of 40 years (1949-1989). A signifcant amount of remaining long-lived radionuclides have been identified around the SNTS area. The population residing in the area was repeatedly exposed to radioactive plumes and fallout that passed through their villages during the period of nuclear test site activity. Thus, the residents of this area have been continuously exposed to both external and internal radiation in the past and continue to be exposed to internal radiation due to the consumption of local food products. In this study we aimed to assess the degree to which local products contribute to the daily ration of area residents. To do this, we applied the previously adapted version of Food Frequency Questionnaire and added a block of questions on the origin of commonly consumed food products. We have identified that meat, potatoes (seasonal vegetables), eggs and dairy products constitute the bulk of food ration and are locally manufactured in 89.2% of cases (range 81/3%-100% depending on the product type). Additionally, the culture of bottled-water consumption is not commonly practiced and nearly 100% of water drunk originated from local water sources. This pattern of food consumption is particularly dangerous for vulnerable population groups (i.e., pregnant women, children under 5 and people with weakened immune systems) and further studies are needed to evaluate the amount of radionuclides consumed with food and water.

Biography

Yuliya Semenova has completed her MSc from the Iniversity College of London, UK and her PhD from Semey State Medical University, Kazakhstan. She is the Associate Professor of surgery department, Semey State Medical University. She has published more than research 20 papers in reputed journals

Speaker
Yuliya Semenova / Semey State Medical University, Kazakhstan

Abstract

Functional foods and food supplements are increasingly demanded. Different strategies involving selective biocatalysis to develop industrial processes in different areas: nutraceuticals, sustainable chemistry, biomedicine, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, biodiesel and fine chemicals, will be presented. Own experience examples of modulation of the enzyme activity or selectivity and/or its immobilization/stabilizacion for implementation of new selective biocatalytic processes will be given. In all the cases, the catalyst, reaction and reactor engineerings were used to design new advantageous synthetic processes of: i) structured lipids and phospholipids with potential effects on diabetes, hyperthension, methabolic syndrome, cancer, etc; ii) fatty acid esters of monosaccharides, fats free trans fatty acids for margarines and others; iii) emulsifiers derived from sugars, polyols and amines; and iv) alpha-hydroxyacids. This work has been financed by MINECO of Spanish Government (grants CTQ2013-41507-R and CTQ2017-86170-R), and the Community of Madrid (grant S2013/ABI-2783, “INSPIRA1-CM”) and Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional.

Biography

Cristina Otero got the bachelor Science in Chemistry and PhD from UAH Univ., Spain and postdoctoral studies from ENS-CSNR, France and from Kent Univ., UK. She is the director of Biocatalysis and Bioenergy Laboratory, ICP-CSIC in Spain. Her expertise field is applied biocatalysis and characterization of bioactive products, lipids, phospholipids, and biodiesel; enzymes, etc; Inventor of several patents and author of a hundred of international scientific publications. She is involved in international research collaborations with chemical engineers, food scientists, chemists and physicists from the USA, Mexico, South Korea, and Slovenia as well as with researchers in her own country.

Speaker
Cristina Otero Hernandez / Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, Spain

Abstract

Based on the composition of human milk (HM), a special mixture of oligosaccharides containing short chain galacto-oligosaccharides (scGOS) and long chain fructo-oligosaccharides (lcFOS) has been evaluated. In a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 259 healthy term infants with a parental history of atopy were fed to either prebiotic supplemented (0.8 g/100 ml scGOS/lcFOS) or placebo supplemented (0.8 g/100 ml maltodextrin) formula during the first 6 months of life. A total of 102 infants in the prebiotic group and 104 infants in the placebo group completed the study. During the intervention period, 10 infants in the prebiotic group (9.8%) and 24 infants in the placebo group (23.1%) developed atopic dermatitis (AD). Infants in the prebiotic group had also a significantly lower number of infections and antibiotic treatments (1-3). From these infants, 134 (68 in placebo and 66 in intervention group) participated to a 2-year follow-up. Infants in the scGOS/lcFOS group had significantly lower incidence of allergic manifestations, infections, and antibiotic prescriptions (4). Growth was normal and similar in both groups. Among these 134 infants, 92 were followed further for a 5-y period. The 5-y allergy associated symptoms were significantly lower in the scGOS/lcFOS group (4.8% vs 28.0%; p<0.05) (5). It can be concluded that early dietary intervention with oligosaccharide prebiotics in infants at risk of allergy has a protective effect against allergic manifestations and infections. This protective effect lasts beyond the intervention period, until 5 years of life with the achievement of adequate growth. References 1. Moro G, Arslanoglu S, Stahl B, et al: A mixture of prebiotic oligosaccharides reducers the incidence of atopic dermatitis during the first six months of age. Arch Dis Child 91:814-819, 2006 2. Moro G, Arslanoglu S, Boehm G: Reducing the burden of atopic dermatitis. Arch Dis Child 92:655-656, 2007 3. Arslanoglu S, Moro G, Boehm G: Early supplementation of prebiotic oligosacchgarides protects formula fed infants against infections during the first 6 months of life. J Nutr 137; 2420-2424, 2007 4. Arslanoglu S, Moro GE, Schmitt J, et al: Early dietary intervention with a mixture of prebiotic oligosaccharides reduces the incidence of allergic manifestations and infections during the first two years of life. J Nutr 138; 1091-1095, 2008 5. Arslanoglu S, Moro GE, Boehm G, et al: Early neutral prebiotic oligosaccharide supplementation reduces the incidence of some allergic manifestations in the first 5 years of life. JBRHA 26, no.3 (S); 49-59, 2012

Biography

GUIDO E. MORO, has been Professor of Neonatology at the University of Milan, Director of the Centre for Infant Nutrition, and Director of the Department of Neonatal Pathology at Macedonio Melloni Hospital in Milan, Italy. His main field of research is infant nutrition: VLBW infants feeding, human milk, and human milk banks (HMBs). In 1985 he founded the HMB of Milan. He has been the first President of the European Milk Bank Association (EMBA). In 2005 he received the “Gold Medal” from the City of Milan, the highest honour for people working in this city. At present he is the President of the Italian Association of Human Milk Banks, which coordinates the activity of 37 banks.

Speaker
Guido E. Moro / Professor of Neonatology, University of Milan, Italy Director of the Agency of Human Milk, Milan, Italy President of the Italian Association of Human Milk Banks (AIBLUD)

Abstract

In recent years, alternative treatment options for NAFLD have been explored. Owing to their wide availability and minimal side effects, research into medicinal plants has acquired great attention from the scientific community lately. A number of herbs and herbal products have been widely inspected as therapeutic agents for NAFLD. The list includes wolfberry, garlic, grape and milk thistle. Yet, it is worth noting that research into the use of phytochemical agents and herbal extracts for the treatment of NAFLD is still in its infancy and extensive mechanistic studies are greatly needed. Phyllantus niruri (Euphorbiaceae) (PN), a herb found in South East Asia, including Malaysia, has traditionally been used for the treatment of a variety of liver disorders. In the present study we attempted to systemically evaluate the potential role of PN in alleviating the symptoms and suppressing the progression of NAFLD among Sprague–Dawley rats. P. niruri decreased visceral adiposity, improved the abnormalities in liver enzymes and decreased lipid peroxidation and fat accumulation in the liver. More interestingly, it has decreased the risk factors of atherosclerosis among NAFLD rats. Current results suggest that further research is needed to develop potent pharmaceutical form of P. niruri to be used as a novel natural hepatoprotective agent against NAFLD and atherosclerosis.

Biography

Raghdaa Hamdan AL Zarzour working as a senior lecture (assistant prof), discipline of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University Sains Malaysia. Specialization: Phamacology. Research interests: 1- Extracting medicinal plants to elucidate their antioxidant activities against different metabolic syndrome disorders. 2- Studying the molecular pathways in the pathophysiology of Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). 3- In vivo & in vitro studies for the discovery of novel therapeutic drugs against NAFLD. 4- Formulating high fat diet for experimental Pharmacology

Speaker
Raghdaa Hamdan Al Zarzour / School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia , Malaysia

Abstract

A considerable proportion of dietary plant-polyphenols reach the colon intact; determining the effects of these compounds on colon-health is of interest. We hypothesise that both fibre and plant polyphenols present in açai (Euterpe oleracea) provide prebiotic and anti-genotoxic benefits in the colon. We investigated this hypothesis using a simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of açai pulp, and a subsequent pH-controlled, anaerobic, batch-culture fermentation model reflective of the distal region of the human large intestine. Following in vitro digestion, 49.8% of the total initial polyphenols were available. In mixed-culture fermentations with faecal inoculate, the digested açai pulp precipitated reductions in the numbers of both the Bacteroides-Prevotella spp. and the Clostridium-histolyticum groups, and increased the short-chain fatty acids produced compared to the negative control. The samples retained significant anti-oxidant and anti-genotoxic potential through digestion and fermentation. Dietary intervention studies are needed to prove that consuming açai is beneficial to gut health.

Biography

Speaker
Randah Alqurashi / University of Roehampton, London, United Kingdom

Abstract

Background: Diabetes complications have been increasingly prevalent among type 2 diabetics during the past decades causing high rates of morbidity and mortality. Measures of the prevalence of diabetes complications will lead to preventive decisions and planning of health care. Objective: To assess the prevalence rates of complications in Type 2 diabetics in two Diabetes Centers in Dubai. Methodology: A cross-sectional descriptive analytical study conducted among type 2 diabetics attending diabetes centers in Dubai. Data was collected form secondary source using patient’s records from two diabetes centers involved in the study. Random sampling technique was used to collect 150 patients proportionally allocated according to the total patients (4700 attending patients) available in the two diabetes centers. Results: The study showed that the most dominant prevalence type of complications: Hyperlipidemia (84%), Neuropathy (34%), Dyslipidemia (32%), Retinopathy (28%), Lethargy (21.3%), and Nephropathy (16.7%). The associations made between three variables each separately (Date of First Visit, HbA1c, and Fasting Blood Glucose) with the prevalence type of complications, showed significant differences in some types: Dyslipidemia, Hyperlipidemia, Neuropathy, Retinopathy, and Joint & Bone pain.

Biography

Speaker
Haleama Al Sabbah / Zayed University, Dubai-UAE

Abstract

Obesity is global problem because of its growing trend, even in the low- and middle-income countries, and because of the well-known consequences being the most indicative of which is the present reduction of life expectancy appearing in some high-income countries. There is a wide consensus that prevention should start at the earliest possible time. Pediatrics is the best time to initiate it because of the increased prevalence in childhood, the clinical burden (comorbidities already present in obese children), tracking and poor therapeutic results. It is worth analyzing why these four issues exist and the way to counteract them. In this general approach it is also necessary to stress the importance of the homogenization of anthropometric measures and their evaluation (Z-score for body mass index and waist circumference), with a general method (Cole) without neglecting the screening methods (centiles). The next general consideration is a consequence of the poor treatment results, which have given way to shamanic therapeutic responses that must be analyzed under the evidence grading score. Preventive trajectories are initiated from global and or national directions and actions that later on fork into social/ environmental milieu and child and family lifestyle. Types of prevention. The three levels of prevention, I.E. primary (before the disease), secondary (latent disease) and tertiary (for disease consequences) plus the fourth holistic level, when carried out in practice fall on the classical questions: What, When and How, issued by WHO Population Health Promotion. What kind of prevention? The answer would be general and individual. The general approach is crowded by a great extent of plans and guidelines, therefore the evidence based policies are and will be applied to clear the overlapping and sometimes confusing panorama. Who is the recipient of prevention? This has been changed because of the notion that earliest prevention should start preconceptionally, going on from pregnancy and into the newborn period. The negative consequences of high birthweight are clearly demonstrated. Even the classical age to start prevention (4-6 years) is receding in favour of the early rebound of BMI. How prevention is carried out? The present ways should be based on demonstrated plans, but a lot of very varied norms appear and these seem unable to solve the problem. New interventions for pediatric population are analyzed and the common points of action are: Reduction of energy intake, Increase of energy expenditure, Involvement of parents/ family and provision of appropriate information to child or adolescent. For this occasion a non-systematic revision of 56 preventive plans has been made and it can be concluded that adult models are of value for early prevention, results about efficiency are scanty, individual approaches are almost absent. In fact there is no great variation to the plans of 50 years ago. In this panorama of some good prevention programs yet increased prevalence trends of obesity in the world it is clear that something new must be done but it has not been defined yet. In the meantime this succinct analysis of positive facts and negative issues, will perhaps contribute step by step to improve the obesity prevention future.

Biography

Speaker
Manuel Moya / University Miguel Hernández, Campus of S, Juan. Alicante

Abstract

Some aspects of fatty acids and carbohydrates interrelat4ion with he process of carcinogenesis scientists interested long time ago. The importance of several dietary fatty acids and carbohydrates in producing malignant tumors is also testified by the data of epidemiological analysis and so-called chronic experiments on animals. It was demonstrated that polyunsaturated fatty acids increase process of carcinogenesis more intensively, than saturated fatty acids. According to the karyogamic theory of carcinogenesis, every substance, which induces somatic cells fusogenic effects of different intensity, especially development of dikaryons, is a potential carcinogen. Some scientists report on fusogenic effect of different fatty acids and cabohydrates in tissue culture (Ackong et al., 1973; 1975). At the same time, we have shown dose-depend association between fusogenic and carcino-genic abilities of some fatty acids. In particular in case of high fusogenic ability of some these substances (for example, oleic acid), formation of giant nonviable polykaryocytes was induced and carcinogenic effect was less manifested; and vice versa: carcinogenic effect was higher in the pre-sence of low fusogenic ability of these substances (for example, linoleic acid) because of formation of mainly dikaryons with high potency of carcinogenicity. Some fatty acids and carbohydrates inducing perforations of definite size on plasma membranes of somatic cells, may form a number of pores enough to change electrical charge of plasma membranes considerably, that makes easy cellular contacts. That circumstance can be premise for cell’s adhesion and further fusion process. According to our assumption, at the first stage of carcinogenesis (initiation), dikaryons and then mononuclear tetraploid or hypotetraploid precancerous cells are produced. At the second stage of carcinogenesis (promotion), precancerous cell following some conversions on a subcellular and molecular levels may be transformed into the true tumor cells.

Biography

Speaker
Gogichadze G.K / Tbilisi State Medical University,Georgia

Abstract

Epidural analgesia (EA) has been shown to be an effective and safe technique, and it is well valued in the management of labor pain, but it is not exempt from adverse effects during this process and with respect to breastfeeding. There are authors that relate EA with the appearance of difficulties in suction, as well as lower figures of breastfeeding, partly influenced by the use of fentanyl at certain doses. Other authors have negatively associated the administration of exogenous oxytocin with breastfeeding, as well as high volumes of infused fluids. AE can lead to more intense monitoring, invasive procedures, and various interventions, which can interfere with skin-to-skin contact, so beneficial in the long term to increase breastfeeding time. However, other authors point out that the success of breastfeeding may be due to the type of attention given to the mother-RN binomial, which can reverse the possible adverse effects of EA during delivery. In conclusion, EA is a safe and effective technique, but adverse effects on breastfeeding have been described. Several authors have described these adverse effects, but there is no consensus on the subject, still under discussion. Breastfeeding is a multifactorial and complex phenomenon, and more quality research is needed, especially clinical trials.

Biography

Antonio Herrera-Gómez, PhD from the Univeristy of Granada (Spain), is a midwife in the Hospital “San Juan de la Cruz” (Servicio Sanitario Publico Andaluz), Ubeda, Jaen (Spain); a researcher in Biomedical Group (BIO277) Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Granada; and member of Institute of Investigacion Biosanitaria, ibs.Granada University of Granada. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of journals about midwifery. I collaborate as a professor at the University of Jaen (Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences).

Speaker
Antonio Herrera Gómez / University of Granada, Spain

Abstract

The EPIC-Norfolk Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) is a free tool used to assess the different levels of nutrient data and basic food groups based on the traditional British diet. The aim of this study was to cross-culturally adapt the FFQ to the multi-ethic population of Kazakhstan, verifying its reliability. At the first step of our study the FFQ was translated into Russian and Kazakh and then back to English. Forty Russian and forty Kazakh native speakers were recruited into the study to evaluate translated versions of the questionnaire. No great semantic and linguistic differences were found, and acceptable reliability was recorded. To minimize the cultural differences we conducted two focus-group discussions with eight Russian and eight Kazakh participants to reveal the irrelevant food items and to identify typical diet habits not covered by the origional questionnaire. All essential corrections were made to Russian and to Kazakh versions of FFQ on the next step. Finally, we recruited fifty individuals of both Kazakh and Russian origin to assess the translated and adapted verison of the FFQ tool. The Russian and the Kazakh versions of the FFQ are found to be the valid tools for assessing food habits and nutrient levels of the population of Kazakhstan.

Biography

Yuliya Semenova has completed her MSc from the Iniversity College of London, UK and her PhD from Semey State Medical University, Kazakhstan. She is the Associate Professor of surgery department, Semey State Medical University. She has published more than research 20 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Yuliya Semenova / Semey State Medical University, Kazakhstan

Abstract

Food is one of the main sources of human exposure to toxic trace elements. In Armenia, the share of plant origin food in overall diet is significantly high, so estimation of dietary intake of toxic trace elements via consumption of selected fruits and vegetables is of great importance for observing the underlying health risks. Hence, the present study was aimed to assess dietary exposure of potentially toxic trace elements through the intake of fruits and vegetables sold in markets of Kapan town, located near the large mining region of Armenia. The concentration of Cu, Mo, Ni, Cr, Pb, Zn, Hg, As and Cd in several commonly consumed fruits and vegetables were determined by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The consumption of selected fruits and vegetables was investigated through food frequency questionnaire. Moreover, estimated daily intake (EDI), target hazard quotient (THQ) and hazard indexes (HI) were assessed. The obtained results showed that among the other studied trace elements, only for Cu and Mo estimated cummulative daily intakes exceeded reference doses. Although for all the investigated fruits and vegetables THQ values were less than 1, they can substantially contribute to total THQ when combined together. HI >1 values obtained for cabbage and bean indicated that there is a risk to local population health through more than one trace element. Thus, further detailed studies are necessary for the overall assessment of potential health implications taking into consideration adverse health effects posed by more than one toxic trace element.

Biography

David Pipoyan has completed his PhD from Tuscia University and got his PhD degree in food science and biotechnology. He is the head of Informational-Analytical Center for Risk Assessment of Food Chain of CENS, RA. Meline Beglaryan completed her PhD from Armenian National Agrarian University (ANAU). Currently she is a postdoctoral researacher in CENS, RA. Nicolò Merendino is a professor (associate) in the Department of Biological and Ecological Sciences (DEB) and the head of Large Equipment Center (Tuscia University). He is also the head of Foundation for the Study of Food and Nutrition (FOSAN, Italy).

Speaker
Meline Beglaryan / 1Informational Analytical Center for Risk Assessment of Food Chain of the Center for Ecological-Noosphere Studies (CENS) of NAS RA, Armenia

Abstract

The origins of donor human milk banking go back to earlier times, when children were breast-fed by friends, relatives or even strangers: a practice defined as “wet nursing”. In the 13th century, European women make more money working as wet nurses than any other occupation open to women. During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, studies showed that infants breastfed by their own mothers or wet nurses had lower mortality rates than artificially fed infants. The first HMB was established in Vienna, Austria, in 1909. In 1980, World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF jointly stated that if it is not possible for the biological mother to breastfeed, the first alternative, if available, should be the use of human milk from other sources. In 2010, the European Milk Bank Association (EMBA) was founded. It is a non-profit organization established to promote milk banking in Europe and to encourage international cooperation between HMBs. Today there are more than 210 HMBs active in Europe. The countries with the largest number of HMBs are Italy (37 banks), France (36 banks), and Sweden (28 banks). In Italy, at the moment, 37 HMBs are operating and their activity is coordinated by the Italian Association of Human Milk Banks (AIBLUD). Recently, cooperation between AIBLUD and the Italian Ministry of Health led to publication of the “Italian National Recommendations for the Organization and Management of Human Milk Banks as a Tool for the Protection, Promotion and Support of Breastfeeding” in the Official Bulletin of the Italian Republic.

Biography

GUIDO E. MORO, has been Professor of Neonatology at the University of Milan, Director of the Centre for Infant Nutrition, and Director of the Department of Neonatal Pathology at Macedonio Melloni Hospital in Milan, Italy. His main field of research is infant nutrition: VLBW infants feeding, human milk, and human milk banks (HMBs). In 1985 he founded the HMB of Milan. He has been the first President of the European Milk Bank Association (EMBA). In 2005 he received the “Gold Medal” from the City of Milan, the highest honour for people working in this city. At present he is the President of the Italian Association of Human Milk Banks, which coordinates the activity of 37 banks.

Speaker
Guido E. Moro / President, Italian Association of Human Milk Banks (AIBLUD) Director, Agency of Human Milk, Milan, Italy Prebiotics in Infants Nutrition

Abstract

A considerable proportion of dietary plant-polyphenols reach the colon intact; determining the effects of these compounds on colon-health is of interest. We hypothesise that both fibre and plant polyphenols present in açai (Euterpe oleracea) provide prebiotic and anti-genotoxic benefits in the colon. We investigated this hypothesis using a simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of açai pulp, and a subsequent pH-controlled, anaerobic, batch-culture fermentation model reflective of the distal region of the human large intestine. Following in vitro digestion, 49.8% of the total initial polyphenols were available. In mixed-culture fermentations with faecal inoculate, the digested açai pulp precipitated reductions in the numbers of both the Bacteroides-Prevotella spp. and the Clostridium-histolyticum groups, and increased the short-chain fatty acids produced compared to the negative control. The samples retained significant anti-oxidant and anti-genotoxic potential through digestion and fermentation. Dietary intervention studies are needed to prove that consuming açai is beneficial to gut health.

Biography

Speaker
Randah Muqbil M. Alqurashi / University of Reading, United Kingdom

Abstract

Applications of nanomaterials (NMs) are not only increasing in biotechnology and biomedicine but also in food products. Hence, humans are increasingly exposed to NMs via the inhalative and oro-gastrointestinal route. Besides the NMs' use as novel anti-bacterial or anti-mycotic agents, the field has just started to explore the interaction of NMs with the microbiome and its (patho)biological consequences. Based on recent insights, we here present review our knowledge on the interaction of NMs with microbes and its analytical investigation, including latest intravital imaging tools. We comment on how the NMs' characteristics influence complex formation with microbes, discuss the underlying physico-chemical forces, and how this knowledge can be used to rationally control NM-microbe interaction. We conclude by discussing the role of the biomolecule corona on NM-microbe crosstalk, and the impact of complex formation on the (patho)biological outcome and fate of exposure to both, NMs and the microbiome. The presented insights will stimulate research on the safety and biomedical relevance of NM-microbiome complex formation in general.

Biography

Speaker
Roland H. Stauber / University Medical Center of Mainz, Germany

Abstract

Healthy diet, nutritional balance and consumption of safe food, particularly fresh fruits and vegetables are of primary importance for today’s society. Fruits and vegetables are an excellent source of soluble and insoluble fiber. To understand the health impact of these food types, it is crucial to investigate the consumption patterns. Therefore, a study was carried out among three different age groups (young adults, middle-aged adults and older adults) of Yerevan population to study consumption patterns and assess fiber intake. An interviewer-administered, semi-quantitative, 12 item based food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was developed to assess the dietary intake during summer, in 2017. In total, 1310 citizens (aged 18-65) took part in the survey. Overall, there is a balanced fiber intake among all the age groups of population. On average, participants reported daily consumption of 34.5g fiber and 2183g of fresh fruits and vegetables during summer, which is approximately 4-6 times higher compared to other countries such as Italy (433 g/day), or international standards (400g/day according to WHO). Although FAO states that fruits and vegetables consumption in Armenia is 480g/day, during summer it is much higher. This high amount is largely explained by the seasonal price variation of these food types. In summer when prices are 6-7 times cheaper than in winter, the daily consumption is 4-6 times higher. So, even a small amount of metals or pesticides found in these food types can pose an adverse health effect. Therefore, further investigation is needed for the assessment of Yerevan population health risk.

Biography

David Pipoyan has completed his PhD from Tuscia University. He is the head of Informational-Analytical Center for Risk Assessment of Food Chain, RA. Seda Stepanyan has completed her Bachelor’s degree from American University of Armenia. She is a lab-researcher at the Informational-Analytical Center for Risk Assessment of Food Chain, RA. Stella Stepanyan has completed her Bachelor’s degree from American University of Armenia. She is a lab-researcher at the Informational-Analytical Center for Risk Assessment of Food Chain, RA.

Speaker
Seda Stepanyan / Center for Ecological-Noosphere Studies National Academy of Sciences, Armenia

Abstract

Tarhana is a traditional fermented cereal food generally consumed as soup at lunch and dinner in Turkey. It is mainly produced from cereals and yogurt, however some cooked vegetables, spices and other ingredients (such as chickpea, egg, milk, parsley etc.) can be added to the formulation of tarhana for increasing its nutritional value. Tarhana has a fermentation process changing between 1 to 22 days after mixing of ingredients. Fermentation increases the protein digestibility of proteins and nutritional value of tarhana. Besides these advantages, fermentation is also used as a preservation method since it decreases the pH level of tarhana and produces organic acids. L*, a* and b* values determines “lightness”, “redness and greenness” and “yellowness and blueness”, respectively. In this study, grape seed extract was added to tarhana formulation and the changes in color values were investigated by Hunter colorimeter for 5th, 10th and 15th days of fermentation in tarhana samples. Tarhana was produced by mixing ingredients and fermentation at 20°C for 15 days. Grape seed extract is a good source of antioxidants and also it has antimicrobial effects. Grape seed extract was added tarhana since it has antioxidant effects and improves its color characteristics. The results of present study pointed out that increasing grape seed extract level decreased L*, a* and b* values. L*, a* and b* values of tarhana samples was found nearly the same at 5th and 10th days of fermentation however decreased at 15th day of fermentation period.

Biography

Sadiye Akan has graduated from Ege University Food Engineering Department (Turkey) with second degree and continues her M.Sc. at Ege University Institute of Natural and Applied Science. She has also graduated from Anadolu University Business and Administration Department (Turkey). She is studying on determination of some chemical properties of tarhana fortified with different levels of grape seed extract for both fermentation and storage period.

Speaker
Sadiye Akan / Ege University, Turkey

Abstract

This presentation begins with re visiting theories and models of public health nutrition approach in health and wellbeing. It will then examines the impact of structural issues including food policy, food production, food price, access, distribution and consumption, as well as ecological, socioeconomic, cultural and food behaviour on Non Communicable Disease prevention and management. A review of the current dietary habits in countries of economic transition and high income countries will be presented with a view to highlight globalisation issues and changes in food seasonality and food behaviour. Finally using the UK case study of food bank, some of the current challenges addressing sustainability, food security and its impact on Public Health Nutrition will be argued and the way forward will be discussed.

Biography

Speaker
Fatemeh Rabiee / Birmingham City UNiversity, United Kingdom

Abstract

Micro nutritional malnutrition is a global public health problem contributing directly and indirectly to morbidity and mortality of billions of peoples worldwide. Vitamin and mineral deficiencies are widespread, affecting one third of the global population. The general objective of the study was assessment of average Individual Dietary Diversity Score (IDDS) in selected adult urban population. In this study 300 subjects of which 150 male and 150 female were studied. Among 300 subjects 100 were hostel student, 100 were non hostel student and 100 were slum people with ranges were 18-30 years of age. The Study was conducted in an urban area of Dhaka. Pre-structured questionnaire was developed with relevant information's. The food intake patterns of the subjects were recorded by 24 hours recall method and used nine food groups for IDDS information. IDDS was calculated according to Low IDDS (<3 Food groups), Moderate IDDS (4-5Food groups) and High IDDS (>6 Food groups). Results showed that 150 male out of 300 participants IDDS and FCS were 4.15±0.88, 6-2, 9.88±1.88, 15-5. On the other hand, among 150 female their IDDS and FCS were 4.28±1.2, 7-2, 9.43±2.38, 15-4. P value of IDDS and FCS were 0.064 and 0.069. Education was the highly significant (p<0.001) associated with Food Consumption Score (FCS) and sex was significant (p<0.03) with Food Consumption Score (FCS). Academic qualification of the family is associated with Individual Dietary Diversity Score (IDDS) and Food Consumption Score (FCS).

Biography

Dr. Mohammad Nazrul Islam has completed his Doctor of Medicine (MD) at the age of 30 years from Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Science and Masters of Philosophy (M.Phil) in Nutrition from the University of Dhaka. He is the Assistant Professor of Hamdard University Bangladesh. He has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a reviewer of OMICs group, editor of Chronicle publishers; Journal of Bacteriology and Parasitology; Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences; International Journal of Biology; Advances in pharmacognosy and phytomedicine; Sci Fed Journal of Herbal Medicine and member of IRED.

Speaker
Mohammad Nazrul Islam / Hamdard University, Bangladesh

Abstract

Food nanotechnology emerges as new frontiers of this century wherein, rapid development of nanoscience is expected to transform many facet of food science and food industry with increasing investment and market share.1-2 Nanoparticles are particularly useful because of their unique properties such as high surface to volume ratios, reactivity, and microscopic size. ‘Nanomaterial’ means a natural, incidental or manufactured material containing particles, in an unbound state or as an aggregate or as an agglomerate and where, for 50 % or more of the particles in the number size distribution, one or more external dimensions is in the size range 1 nm-100 nm.3-4 Nano science is having a remarkable impact in emerging areas like food processing and agriculture with improved aspects of smart delivery of nutrients, bioseparation of proteins, rapid sampling of biological and chemical contaminants, nanoencapsulation of nutraceuticals, solubilization, delivery and color in food systems.5 Since properties of food at the nano level differ from macro level hence nanotechnology could be used to fabricate the innovative food products. “Smart food wrapping” will enable us to detect spoilage and the presence of harmful contaminants in food products. Also, to suit the tastes and health needs of individual consumer future foods will be able to change their organoleptic properties or nutrient contents. There is a wide range of potential applications where nanotechnology could provide innovative solutions for the food and beverage industry as evident from Fig 1.5-7 In spite of having wide scope in food sector this concept suffers from challenges like potential toxic effects, safety and edible delivery system.1,8-9 Thus, is a need to develop standardized language, regulations, quantification and technical procedures to assure safe exposure of nano food science by the consumer.10

Biography

Speaker
Swati Kimothi / Palampur, India

Abstract

Moringa oleifera and Pleurotus ostreatus are widely used as food or food supplements. They are demonstrated to have many beneficial effects on nutritional status and human health. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the nutritional value of M. oleifera and P. ostreatus mixture in specific proportions. The mushroom species was cultivated at the Mushroom Biotechnology Laboratory and M. oleifera at the botanical garden of the University Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar, Senegal. The compost of P. ostreatus culture was corn and straw peanut. Mixtures of different proportion powders of M. oleifera and P.ostreatus were used for investigations. Results showed that the product contain 35.08% crude proteins, 14.28% carbohydrates, 22.71% fat, 20.96% fibers and 6.98% of total ash. The energy was 401.79 kcal for 100 g of dry matter. Among minerals, potassium (1566.83 mg/100 g) are the most abundant mineral element followed by phosphorus (318.55 mg/100 g), calcium (284.33 mg/100 g) and magnesium (253.14 mg/100 g); the less abundant was copper with 0.53 mg/100 g. This study shows that the used proportion of M. oleifera leaves and P. ostreatus powders mixture could be a good source of minerals, proteins and carbohydrates.

Biography

Speaker
FATOU CORKA KANE / UNIVERSITE DE YAOUNDE I, India

Abstract

Nowhere are the linkages between hidden hunger and food nutritional security stronger than in Africa where per capita food production, vegetable intake and micro nutrient requirements have steadily declined for the past three decades. In Africa, abuses and mismanagement in the field of nutrition often lead to low quality of live, low life expectancy, high infant and maternity mortality rate. Most of the endemic diseases caused by hidden hunger; blindness, anemia, pneumonia, scurvy and malaria are still rife with resulting high rural under-development, under-employment and rural urban migration. Rapid population growth, economic and social decline are brutal driving forces behind the hidden hunger in Africa. This has led to the explosion of city populations at a rate faster than social services, essential nutrition, infrastructures and employment opportunities can be provided. The ranks of the urban unemployed are filled with unemployable job seekers. Cultures are lost, as dignity and identity are washed away in the hidden food security tribulations sweeping over the continent. Too seldom do we consider hidden hunger as causes of these factors in Africa. Summarized are our six different intelligent agronomic model studies spanning over two decades that significantly improves vegetable productivity, income, health, employment and could solve hidden hunger menace for nutritional food security purposes in the African region. What is needed is commitment to utilize these findings. Governments must come to understand that if they are to succeed against the nutritional hidden hunger war, they must enlist the understanding, then the active co-operation and the assistance of the people who are most affected by the crisis not only on the international levels, but on local villages and most importantly on individual family units.

Biography

Speaker
DAVID O. OJO / NIHORT, Nigeria

Abstract

Abstract Background: Peripheral neuropathy remains latent in the early phase of hypothyroidism. Combination of thyroxine with vitamin B12 may improve the electrophysiological status of motor function of median and ulnar nerves in hypothyroid patients. Objectives: To assess the combined effects of thyroxine with vitamin B12 on electrophysiological changes in motor function of median and ulnar nerves of hypothyroid female. Methods: This prospective interventional study was carried out in the Department of Physiology, Sir Salimullah Medical College (SSMC) from July’ 2015 to June’ 2016. Forty (40) hypothyroid female patients aged 20-45 years with abnormal motor nerve conduction parameters were selected from Out Patients Department of SSMC and BSMMU. Among them, 20 hypothyroid patients received only thyroxine (HT-T4) and another 20 hypothyroid patients received combined therapy of thyroxine and vitamin B12 (HT-C) for 90 days. All the patients were studied two times; on day 1(before starting their treatment and designated as HT-T4b and HT-Cb) and on day 90(after treatment and designated as HT-T4a and HT-Ca). Furthermore, 20 euthyroid female subjects (ET) with normal electrophysiological status were taken for comparison and were studied only on day 1. The neurological examinations of all subjects were done to evaluate their motor functions under the guidance of expert neurologists of BSMMU. Their serum TSH, FT4, FT3 levels were estimated for assessment of thyroid function status by ELISA method. Nerve conduction parameters of motor divisions of median and ulnar nerves were studied to observe the electrophysiological status and vitamin B12 level was also estimated to observe its level by using standard method. The statistical analysis was done by ANOVA test, paired, independent sample ‘t’ test and Chi-square (χ2) tests. Results: In this study, serum TSH was decreased and FT4 and FT3 levels were significantly increased in both groups after 90 days supplementation of thyroxine alone and combined therapy of thyroxine with vitamin B12. Again, latency was significantly decreased, amplitude and NCV were significantly increased in motor division of median and ulnar nerves of hypothyroid patients after supplementation of combined therapy of thyroxine with vitamin B12 in comparison to those of their presupplemented state and also to those of patients with only thyroxine treatment. Moreover, vitamin B12 level was significantly increased along with improvement of neurological sign-symptoms after 90 days supplementation of combined therapy of thyroxine with vitamin B12 in comparison to those of their presupplemented state and also to that of only thyroxine group. Conclusion: The present study revealed that thyroxine alone can improve nerve conduction parameters to some extent but the combination of thyroxine with vitamin B12 can reduce the symptoms of hypothyroid induced peripheral neuropathy and accelerate the nerve conduction velocity of motor functions of median and ulnar nerves more effectively than the treatment with thyroxine alone.

Biography

Speaker
Nayma Sultana / Sir Salimullah Medical College, Bangladesh

Abstract

Moringa oleifera and Pleurotus ostreatus are widely used as food or food supplements. They are demonstrated to have many beneficial effects on nutritional status and human health. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the nutritional value of M. oleifera and P. ostreatus mixture in specific proportions. The mushroom species was cultivated at the Mushroom Biotechnology Laboratory and M. oleifera at the botanical garden of the University Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar, Senegal. The compost of P. ostreatus culture was corn and straw peanut. Mixtures of different proportion powders of M. oleifera and P.ostreatus were used for investigations. Results showed that the product contain 35.08% crude proteins, 14.28% carbohydrates, 22.71% fat, 20.96% fibers and 6.98% of total ash. The energy was 401.79 kcal for 100 g of dry matter. Among minerals, potassium (1566.83 mg/100 g) are the most abundant mineral element followed by phosphorus (318.55 mg/100 g), calcium (284.33 mg/100 g) and magnesium (253.14 mg/100 g); the less abundant was copper with 0.53 mg/100 g. This study shows that the used proportion of M. oleifera leaves and P. ostreatus powders mixture could be a good source of minerals, proteins and carbohydrates.

Biography

Speaker
FATOU CORKA KANE / UNIVERSITE DE YAOUNDE I, Senegal

Abstract

The study describes one paediatric patient of 72 months of age with refractory status epilepticus treated with classical ketogenic diet (CKD). CKD is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate, normal protein diet with an established efficacy for treating refractory epilepsy in paediatric population. Refractory status epilepticus is defined as continuous seizures despite administration of 3 consecutive anti-epileptic drugs. The patient with diagnostic criteria of refractory status epilepticus was seen at our neurology clinic and placed on CKD for 6 months to observe the efficacy and tolerability of the diet in controlling the seizures. The intervention included nutritional counseling, administration of ketogenic diet, assessing and improving the quality of life of the family and monitoring the blood parameters during the treatment. The child with progressive encephalopathy associated with repeated seizure episodes had a 75% seizure reduction in first 3 months and 20% seizure reduction along with remarkable cognitive development in last 3 months of the intervention. The number of anti-epileptic drugs has reduced from 5 to 2. The quality of life of the patient and the family is improved as the child started walking, communicating and responding to her parents. There were no reported incidents of nausea, vomiting, constipation or loose motions, which are typical complains related to ketogenic diet administration as per several trials. The study suggests that the classical ketogenic diet is an effective and well-tolerated treatment option for patients with refractory status epilepticus and should be considered as a potential course of treatment in managing the disorder.

Biography

Miss. Subhasree Ray is pursuing her PhD in the department of Food Science & Nutrition, SNDT Women’s University, Mumbai, India. Her research areas include ketogenic diet therapy, dietary management of neurodegenerative diseases, medical nutrition therapy, public health nutrition, food chemistry, probiotics, food toxicology and nutrigenomics. She has published 15 research articles so far and also worked in management of severe acute malnutrition along with national government. She is also associated with social welfare activities with several NGOs in Mumbai.

Speaker
SUBHASREE RAY / SNDT Women’s University, India

Sessions:

Scientific Session 2

Abstract

Infantile Scurvy or Moller-Barlow’s disease appears to be of no further importance in western countries. Especially with severely disabled children this malady expresses itself with a broad range of symptoms such as delayed or suppressed bone healing, minor traumatization leading to bruises/fractures and epiphyseolysis. This talk aims to present the required daily uptake of vitamin c with the biochemical pathways in the human body related to the typical symptoms of the disease. Two cases of chronic scurvy with prolonged bone healing and bleeding, epiphyseolysis and gingival hyperplasia are presented. Both patients were chronically ill with one having cerebral palsy (GMCSF-level IV) and the other a neuroblastoma of the adrenal gland. After diagnosis the substitution of scurvy in both patients via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy had to be performed to be able to treat the patient. In both patients full recovery was achieved quickly. The two patients presented show the importance of infantile scurvy in the daily medical care. Especially in the severely disabled or chronically ill children its prevalence is often underestimated.

Biography

Desirée Schwetje has completed his PhD from the University of Göttingen, Germany, as well as l’Université de Pais Sud XI, France. Her doctor thesis centered on infantile scurvy in three archeological sites in the northern and middle americas. Since 2016 she is an intern at the University hospital in Bonn, Germyn at the departement of orthopedics and traumatology.

Speaker
Desirée Schwetje / University ohspital of Bonn, Germany

Abstract

Obesity has become a major global health problem with epidemic proportions. Calorie restriction, physical exercise or psychologic support have failed to achieve efficient long-term weight loss maintenance or metabolic control. Plant-derived polyphenols have shown potential to alleviate obesity-related pathologies by a multi-targeted mechanism in animal models and human intervention studies. We aimed to develop a combination of Lippia citriodora (LC) and Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS) polyphenolic extracts that reduced triglyceride accumulation and showed AMPK-activating capacity in a hypertrophied insulin-resistant 3T3-L1 adipocyte model. The volunteers consuming the dietary supplement exhibited increased weight loss, improved anthropometric parameters, decreased systolic blood pressure and heart rate, as well as showed an improvement of decreased hunger and appetite compared to the placebo group. These satiety changes in the intervention group correlated with a reduction in circulating resistin and normalization of leptin expression, while regulating ghrelin levels. Contrary to the weight regain effect expected upon calorie restriction, we observed that plant polyphenols increased anorexigenic hormones (GLP-1) and decrease orexigenic hormones (ghrelin), leading to the compensation between hunger and energy expenditure and narrowing energy gap. Although further research may be required, we propose that the polyphenolic combination may be used for weight management by increasing long-term weight loss maintenance through the modulation of appetite biomarkers.

Biography

Enrique Roche is Doctor in Biology by the University of Valencia (1988). He did a post-doctoral stage in the Department of Biochemistry of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (USA) (1989-1990). Then, he was Associated Professor in the Institute of Clinical Medicine at the University of Geneva (Switzerland) (1990-1994). Finally, he was Associated Professor in the Department of Nutrition of the University of Montreal (Canada) (1994-1996). Actually, he is Head of Research in the department of Applied Biology-Nutrition at the University Miguel Hernandez (Alicante). He has published more than 125 papers in indexed journals.

Speaker
Enrique Roche / Institut of Bioenginering University Miguel Hernandez, Spain

Abstract

One major challenge in the delivery of probiotic products is the reduced survival of the probiotic microorganisms caused by the high or low temperature during processing and storage, and the extreme acidic pH conditions in the gut (such as the gastric juice) before reaching the target site colon. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of encapsulation and coating with hydrocolloids on the viability of L. acidophilus (La05) during freeze-drying and in simulated gastrointestinal conditions. La05 was encapsulated in 2 different hydrocolloid matrices namely (1) alginate (ALG) and (2) gelatin (GEL) using extrusion method with calcium chloride solution. The beads obtained were subsequently subjected to 3 different coating materials namely (1) β-glucan (BG), (2) chitosan (CH), and (3) gellan gum (GG). All encapsulated La05, with and without coating, were exposed to freeze-drying and subsequently 4-hr sequential simulated gastrointestinal environment. Free cells of La05 was used as the control sample. Free cells of La05 recorded 3.58 log CFU g-1 reduction in cell viability during freeze-drying, from the initial (before freeze-drying) 8.90 log CFU g-1 to the final (after freeze-drying) 5.32 log CFU g-1. Cell viability during freeze-drying of the encapsulated La05 was improved (p<0.05) with a reduction of 1.86 - 1.92 log CFU g-1, from the initial 8.24 – 9.07 log CFU g-1 to the final 6.32 - 7.21 log CFU g-1. The cell viability during freeze-drying was further enhanced by coating with a lower reduction of 1.22 - 1.52 log CFU g-1, from the initial 8.10 – 8.88 log CFU g-1 to the final 6.66 - 7.53 log CFU g-1. The protection on the La05 by the encapsulation was again demonstrated during the simulated gastrointestinal exposure with a lower reduction in cell viability (4.22-4.23 log CFU g-1) for the encapsulated La05. Further protection on the La05 by coating was evident as a much lower reduction in cell viability (2.64 – 3.43 log CFU g-1) was observed during the simulated gastrointestinal exposure. Without the protection of encapsulation and/or coating, the free cells of La05 were undetectable after the simulated gastroinstestinal exposure. In conclusion, encapsulation provided protection to La05 during both freeze-drying and simulated gastrointestinal exposure. Additional coating to the encapsulated La05 provided further protection to the La05. As compared to the other samples, GEL-encapsulation with BG-coating provided the highest protection to La05 during freeze-drying and in simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

Biography

Speaker
Chee Kiong Siew / Universiti Malaysia , Malaysia

Abstract

The westernization of the diet plays a role in the development of socialization of Tamil child (0-6 years) born in France and in South India. This would seem to be confirm by the results of analysis of food habits of children (conducted surveys and France and in India -children and parents-). The two most important periods in the life of a woman (who will have or already has a child) are intrauterine phase and breastfeeding period. Two major times for the child: 0-3 and 3-6 years old, will determine the future of his growth and the cause of some pathologies. For Tamil children who reside in France, often the oldest is breastfed for 1 year, for others from the same family, it will be up to 3, 4 months. The diversification starts at 5/6 months. In South India, mother’s milk is the main food of the child up to 8 months, time of the diversification. But some women who are not involved in a job continue breastfeeding up to, 1, 2, 3 years. But beyond 9 months, it is required to receive solid food supplements, otherwise there is a risk of vitamins deficiencies, as it is often the case. Vitamin D is important, since the food does not provide the necessary quantity. It is available too in France. There are different degrees of poverty, as there are several levels of wealth: this is what constitutes part of the disparity in the growth of the child. Tamil children (3-6) born in France (except for the breakfast) have two main meals cooked at the Tamil manner but to this balanced cuisine (vegetables, rice, fish or chicken) are added supplemented dishes such as pizza, hamburgers…not every day, but it weigh down the nutritional composition of these meals. Consumption of snacks is very important during the day. For those born in India, all the meals are Indian. But the daily intake of calorie is clearly not enough for some, and one third of them are underweight. It is not only thinness body constitution wise, but also malnutrition. Deficiencies in vitamins and trace elements are high. The Westernization particularly affects children of the rich and emerging classes which is growing, some of the parents take their children to restaurants where there will drink cola and soda, eat ice creams. Others go to places like fast food (in France too) where they can get burgers and sweet desserts. And obesity is emerging seriously as far as adiposity rebound, specifically among the young one in this class. India is the world capital of diabetes, which can be genetic or is linked with obesity. And this is true in the case of Tamil emigrated in France as well as for those living in India. A key to success in India would be to give to the woman a better education, a better knowledge becoming a pregnant woman and especially about nutrition

Biography

Dr. MALENFANT: PhD in Economics PARIS I (France), School of Medical Studies (BOBIGNY, diploma in Medical Anthropology and Nutrition). Published a lot of articles in nutritional, pediatrics reviews. Expert at the French Food Research in Paris, and give lectures in India. Has published recently (in French and in English): FOOD HABITS AND LIFE STYLES OF TAMILS IN FRANCE AND SOUTH INDIA, which received the 2 price from the GOURMANDS COOKBOOKS AWARDS for India in 2016.

Speaker
Chantal MALENFANT / Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (C.N.R.S), France

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of debittering fermentation methods on the physiochemical and sensory properties of table olive varieties. The panelist results of appearance, aroma, taste and texture showed that and regarding the de-bittering methods of fermentation the most preference sensory attributes are found in treated with NaOH followed significantly by whole, scratchy and ticked, respectively. The consumer results varied and showed that the higher values of overall appearance found in treated with NaOH followed significantly by whole, scratchy, and ticked, respectively. Also, the higher values of overall flavor and taste found in treated with NaOH followed significantly by ticked, scratchy, and whole, respectively. The higher values of overall texture found in whole followed significantly by treated with NaOH, scratchy and ticked, respectively. The higher values of overall bitter taste found in whole followed significantly by, scratchy, ticked and treated with NaOH, respectively. In conclusion, sensory parameters haven’t big difference were found in comparison with ticked and scratchy table olives fermentation de-bittering methods. Instrumental texture results were agreed with descriptive analysis and consumer results Keywords: Table olives, fermentation, sensory evaluation

Biography

Speaker
Taha M. Rababah / Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan

Abstract

Background: Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a congenital, hereditary metabolic disorder in which blood levels of phenylalanine (Phe) is extremely high because of lack of the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). Without treatment this results in severe mental retardation, microcephaly, epilepsy and other neurological symptoms caused by severe high cerebral concentrations of Phe and/or low cerebral concentrations of other Large Neutral Amino Acids (LNAA). Supplement of LNAA in adult patients has in some studies shown to be capable of some degree of lowering blood Phe level, while the influence of cerebral Phe content has been greatest. Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of short-term treatment with two different products containing LNAA in varying amounts in relation to lower blood (and thus brain) levels of Phe in adult patients with PKU. Furthermore, it was investigated whether variation in product and dosage affects general wellbeing in this patient group without change of habitual diet. Methods: The study was a prospective, randomized, double-blind cross over study with a total of four consecutive periods of three weeks. Twelve patients aged 20-43 years tested two different LNAA tablets (Prekunil and Neophe), both preparations in two different doses. Patients received blood tests for analysis of amino acid profile and toxicological blood samples at baseline and at the end of each period, a total of five times. At the end of each period the participants filled out an SF36 form and a 3-day dietary record. In addition, the patients did blood tests at home every day the last week of each period, a total of seven times. These blood samples were analysed for plasma Phe and - tyrosine. Results: There was no significant difference between the four treatment groups, either with respect to blood Phe, amino acid profiles or general wellbeing Conclusions: High dose of LNAA did not influence the Phe level significantly but had an enhancing effect on tyrosine. Twenty-five % of the participants reported that they felt markedly better on high dose Neophe.

Biography

Speaker
Kirsten Kiær Ahring / Copenhagen University Hospital , Denmark

Abstract

The preservation of future generation and the protection of consumer welfare, as contained in the “Maqasid Shariah”, is a priority in view of the incremental negative behaviours existing in today’s societies at large. This qualitative research on halal nutrition focused on halal food consumed by the Prophet Muhammad s.a.w. and his eating practices. Milk is the favorite food and drink of the Prophet Muhammad s.a.w. It is considered as the most ideal balanced human food that contains all vitamins and minerals primarily calcium, necessary for the growth of infants, young and old people. Breastfeeding is encouraged in Islam through the Qur’an “Mothers may breastfeed their children two complete years for whoever wishes to complete the nursing [period]” (Surah al-Baqarah 2:233), 1400 years ago in contrary to WHO which recommended mothers to do so in 2011. It is encouraged mothers worldwide to exclusively breastfeed infants for the first six months to achieve optimal growth, development and health followed with nutritious complementary foods and continue breastfeeding up to the age of two years. Exclusive breastfeeding reduces infant mortality due to common childhood illnesses such as diarrhoea or pneumonia, and helps for a quicker recovery during illness. Milk is pure, desirable and palatable to the drinkers as stated in the Qur’an “And verily in cattle (too) will ye find an instructive Sign. From what is within their bodies between excretions and blood, We produce, for your drink, milk, pure and agreeable to those who drink it”. (Surah An-Nahl 16:66). A new scientific study had drawn attention that drinking two cups of milk daily can prevent incidence of Alzheimer at aging (Telegraph, 2009). The research attempted to develop the framework of Halal Nutrition to provide proper nutrition guidelines for quality and better consumption of halal food for the future generation. Keyword: Halal; Maqasid Shariah

Biography

Speaker
Hajjah Mariam binti Abdul Latif / Universiti Malaysia Sabah , Malaysia

Abstract

Probiotics have been defined by The Food Agricultural Organization/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) as “live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit to the host.” They have been used for centuries in the form of dairy-based fermented products, but the potential use of probiotics as a form of medical nutrition therapy has not received formal recognition. A detailed literature review (from 1950 through February 2004) of English-language articles was undertaken to find articles showing a relationship between probiotic use and medical conditions. Medical conditions that have been reportedly treated or have the potential to be treated with probiotics include diarrhea, gastroenteritis, irritable bowel syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis), cancer, depressed immune function, inadequate lactase digestion, infant allergies, failure-to-thrive, hyperlipidemia, hepatic diseases, Helicobacter pylori infections, genitourinary tract infections, and others. The use of probiotics should be further investigated for possible benefits and side-effects in patients affected by these medical conditions.

Biography

Speaker
Shruti Sharma / Indira Gandhi National Open University, India

Abstract

Meat is a high source of protein which is needed in our diet and contains all the essential amino acids, iron, zinc and vitamins A, B12, B6, D and E. In Central Africa, meat consumption is important in reducing the malnutrition rate; unfortunately, several outbreaks of foodborne infections have been associated with the consumption of meat. The main objective of this study was to establish a microbial control protocol for bovine and camel meat in Chad and Cameroon. This was carried out in the Food Safety Laboratory and Public Health Laboratory of the Biotechnology Center at the University of Yaoundé I and the Laboratory of the Institute of Livestock Research for Development of N'Djamena. From the meat production chain of the slaughterhouses, a total of 120 samples of dried meat, fresh meat and kilichi were collected from 02 May 2015 to 15 February 2016 in Yaoundé and N'Djamena. The microbiological analysis was done in according to the criteria of EU regulation, specific standards (EC) No 1441/2007 on meat. The virulence genes of Salmonella, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were investigated by PCR and electrophoresis. Data were analysed using IBM SPSS 20 software at the 95 % of safety factor level. The results of the surveys, the reports and the quality management system of meat enabled us to establish the manual of procedure of microbial control of meat with the proposed easily applied methods. The results showed that 66.25 % of meat sellers were not knowledgeable with good hygiene and processing practices. The E. coli record a mean of 3.1 log10 ufc/g of dry meat from N’Djamena and 2.2 log10 ufc/g of dry meat from Yaoundé. 30 % and 60 % of roasted meat from Yaoundé and N'Djamena respectively contained S. aureus. 55 % of fresh meat from Yaoundé were out of standards with respect to S. aureus against 35 % of fresh meat from N’Djamena. However, 90 % of the Kilichi of N'Djamena and 75 % of the Kilichi of Yaoundé did not contain Salmonella. The results of molecular analyses showed that 80 % of the identified Salmonella carried the virulent invA gene, 40 % of Escherichia coli strains were positive for the virulent stx1 gene and 20 % of Staphylococcus aureus carried the coa gene which are responsible for the health problems. The results of invA gene digestion products demonstrated that there were no variations in the invA gene of isolated Salmonella strains. The microbial meat control procedure manual established, with proposed easily applied methods, can be used for quality control management of meat.

Biography

Speaker
Djimadoum KIMASSOUM / Biotechnology Centre, University of Yaoundé I , Chad

Abstract

Cancer patients who receive radiotherapy often suffer from the adverse events. Therefore, reduction of radiation-induced damage in normal tissues, included in treatment volume, has been crucial. We have tried to seek efficient way to resolve the issue and found out that intake of tomato juice, containing various kinds of anti-oxidants or radical scavengers, could be among the most promising candidates. Recently, we showed that tomato juice consumption could contribute to decrease radiation-induced damage of human lymphocytes in whole blood. Volunteers were asked to drink tomato juice for 3 weeks and then refrain from drinking it for 3 weeks. Blood samples were collected before and after intake period and after washout period. The concentration of carotenoids in plasma was measured at the 3 time-points. The samples were exposed to X-rays, and the oxidative stress and the cytogenetic damage were estimated. The concentration of carotenoids increased after intake period comparing with other time-points. The level of oxidative stress tended to decrease after intake period. The level of radiation-induced cytogenetic damage was lowered after intake period. It was suggested that continuous tomato juice consumption could suppress the level of radiation-induced damages in normal tissue cells. Further, we have started a clinical trial focusing on the tissue recovery effects of continuous tomato juice consumption to relieve symptoms and signs and shorten the duration of acute and subacute adverse events in breast cancer patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery. In this review, a part of the interesting results will be commented, too.

Biography

Yasushi Mariya has established his carrier chiefly as a radiation oncologist. He also has had his expertise in the related research fields, radiation biology, cytopathology and laboratory medicine. He is Vice President of Mutsu General Hospital, where he has been since 2016. He serves as Clinical Professor of Hirosaki University School of Medicine and Clinic Manager of Aomori Prefecture Quantum Science Center, too. During 2012-2016 he was Professor at Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Sciences. He obtained his medical license in 1984. He received his Ph.D. from Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine in 1988. From 1994 to 1995 he studied at the Institute for Medical Radiation Biology, University Hospital Essen, Germany, supported by Monbusyo Fellowship Program for Japanese Scholars and Researchers to Study

Speaker
Yasushi Mariya / Mustu General Hospital, Japan

Abstract

Sciadonic acid (Scia; 20:35,11,14) is a distinctive fatty acid (FA) with a polymethylene-interrupted double bond at C5. It is specifically found in seeds from gymnosperms such as pine nuts. Published papers describe a decrease in liver and plasma triacylglycerols in rats fed with this nutriment. The present study sought to identify the action mechanism of Scia on triacylglycerol synthesis and secretion. In this way, its nutritional effect on FA metabolism involving the hepatic 9-desaturase named Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase 1 (SCD1) was investigated. Scia was discerned in trace amount in various tissues of rats, as well as in human serum. Despite its unusual non-malonic structure absent in mammals, it was produced by 5-desaturation of 20:2n-6 in rat primary hepatocytes and also in human transfected SH-SY5Y cell lines. When Scia was incubated with cultured hepatocytes as a nutrient, the cellular FA profile was modified. In particular, the proportion of linoleic acid (18:2n-6) was increased, whereas the proportion of the monoenes (18:1n-9, 18:1n-7, 16:1n-7) were all decreased, correlating to the reduction of triacylglycerol amounts. This effect was mediated by the inhibition of the gene and protein expression of SCD1. Furthermore, Scia, as well as 20:3n-6 and 20:3n-9 but not 20:3n-3, strongly inhibited the SCD1 activity measured on liver microsomes. Overall this study showed that Scia, in spite of its unusual structure, contributes to the FA metabolism and reduced triacylglycerol release by inhibiting SCD1 activity in hepatocytes.

Biography

Speaker
Pédrono Frédérique / Agrocampus Ouest INRA, France

Abstract

Homestead is a low-cost production system that benefits family nutrition, increase household income, provides a buffer to food insecurity during lean season, provides habitat protection and soil conservation. In Bangladesh, homestead occupies about 0.27 million hectares of total land. The Teknaf peninsula is situated at the southeast corner of Bangladesh, which is a food shortage area. The aim of this study was to investigate the homestead production system for sustainable food supply and its contribution to annual income of the smallholders. The study was conducted in Teknaf in September to November 2016. A total 100 households were selected randomly and were investigated coving four major ethnic communities namely Bengali, Rakhaine, Chakma and Rohingya. A structured interview schedule was used for data collection. We found various components in homesteads including timber, fruit, vegetables, poultry, and livestock. On an average about 60%, 47% and 40% requirements of vegetables, fruits and animal products of a household were contributed from the homestead. It was observed few householders sold their extra products to the local market for income generation. Moreover, homesteads also provided a large amount of egg, meat and milk. Since most of the householders are poor and cannot afford daily balance nutrition by using cash money, they can get quality food and daily nutrition from the homestead. Homestead contributed more than 25% to the annual income and there is still scope to improve homesteads for income generation. Therefore, a well-designed homestead could ensure food and nutrition security and high income generation for the householders.

Biography

Md. Abiar Rahman is a Professor, Department of Agroforestry and Environment at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University (BSMRAU) where he has been a faculty member since 2001. Abiar completed his PhD at Kyushu University, Japan in 2008. His research interests lie in the area of Agroforestry and Environment with a focus on sustainable crop production and food security. In recent years, he has focused on homestead for sustainable food production. Abiar has published 31 papers and supervised 14 MS students. He has presented his works in 19 conferences. He offers three courses at graduate and undergraduate levels of BSMRAU.

Speaker
Md Abiar Rahman / Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University, Bangladesh

Abstract

This review was undertaken to integrate the evidence of correlation which exist between prakriti(genotype), metabolism(agni), chronic diseases and nutrition. This article succinctly explores the parallels in modern medicine and Ayurveda about the role of agni (metabolic activity) in chronic diseases. Charak stated that the all organisms are composed of Panchamahabhutas (five elements of nature) and the food which we consume is also made up of these five elements. Three basic genopsycho-somatotypes or birth constitutions are formed by these Panchamahabhutas: endomorphic(Kapha), ectomorphic (Vata) and mesomorphic (Pitta). In contemporary science, diet is recommended considering Resting energy expenditure which depends upon certain factors (age, sex, height and weight), quantum and digestibility while Ayurveda considers factors: prakriti (natural qualities of food article), processing, compatibility of food combination, quantity, place, metabolic activity and dietetic protocols. Various studies established the correlation of prakriti(constitution) of the body and metabolic rate of individuals. Kapha, pitta and Vata prakriti are found to have unique metabolic activities. According to Ayurveda, pitta is fast, kapha is slow, and Vata is considered to have a variable metabolism. Acharya Charaka has mentioned that diet opposite to prakriti of the individual and certain incompatible food combinations, disturbs the whole metabolism (selective uptake and processing of nutrients) at cellular level hence affect the tissues formations and blockage of circulatory system by toxic metabolites (by product of incomplete assimilation and disturbed metabolism) also get clogged irrespective of consumption of nutritional food. Consequently, disturb the unique proportion of Panchamahabhutas of individual constitution which manifests in form of broad spectrum of diseases.so there is mounting evidence that we are what we assimilate not what we eat or digest. in this paper, a sincere attempt is made to analyse the content from all plausible sources about the role of agni (metabolic rate) in the maintenance of health, prediction and prevention of the succession of chronic diseases like metabolic syndromes, challenges of concrete evaluation of metabolic rate at the cellular level and probable & feasible approach to correct it.

Biography

Speaker
Jyoti / All India Institute of Ayurveda, India

Abstract

The Human Journey-Coming Full Circle Balance emerged as a theme early in the century, but has evolved over time to become more all-encompassing as consumers developed new meanings and practices around what being healthy and well means. Ancient wellness culture focused on the whole person understanding that good health encompasses a balance in body, mind and spirit. However, somewhere in the frenzy of industrialization, development, processing and mass production, there was a shift in human values from simple, wholesome and nutritious to synthetic, unnatural and unhealthy. Thanks to the progress in science, technology and disease treatments, the world saw a steady but consistent rise in life expectancy. Higher consumer awareness has led to the rise of popular psychology, as well as an increased emphasis on exercise and regular health checks, has brought about the change of course for health care from a treatment-oriented approach to preventative-oriented and wellness approach. Wellness takes into account every aspect of life, from personal life to working life, physical health to emotional health, intellectual stimulation to spiritual wellbeing. The increasing demand for preventative as well as treatment oriented health care has led to inevitable increases in the costs yet has encouraged clinicians and patients to think differently about health and disease and created a momentum for nutraceuticals, with opportunities for pharma and food companies to get involved in the disease/care pathway. The convergence of modern medical treatments with the natural and alternative therapies seems inevitable in the human beings quest for a healthy and fulfilling life. In this quest comes the single, most-powerful trend is consumers� desire for foods and ingredients that are �naturally functional�. There has been increasing concerns about chemical side effects and introduction of synthetic additives into foods consumer demand for natural alternatives increased dramatically. The industry responded to such demand by focusing on customisation of products to focus on natural alternatives for established variants. People have shown they want regular food that confers some health benefit, seems natural, is easy to understand, and relates to their own needs. However, the nutraceutical market place is fragmented as there is no one company that can exert enough influence to move the industry in a particular direction. The market consists of several small to medium-sized companies that compete with each other and large enterprises. By complementing each other�s strengths (and weaknesses), a merger of the nutraceuticals portfolios of a big food company and a big pharmaceuticals company might make sense. To ensure a steady growth, nutraceutical manufacturers should adopt an approach that aligns with consumers� health needs. Legitimate health claims on the products can help win the consumers� confidence. The regulatory authorities, on the on the other hand, need to articulate guidelines and standardize protocols for developing, categorizing and marketing nutraceutical foods to meet the need new age consumers� needs. Indian Nutraceutical Regulations-where does it all fit? The regulations and guidelines related to Functional foods and Nutraceuticals was published earlier this year (2017) by The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI). FSSAI has been established under Food Safety and Standards, 2006 which consolidates various acts & orders that have handled food related issues in various Ministries and Departments. FSSAI has been created for laying down science based standards for articles of food and to regulate their manufacture, storage, distribution, sale and import to ensure availability of safe and wholesome food for human consumption. The main responsibilities of the FSSAI include, framing of regulations to lay down the standards, mechanisms and guidelines in relation to articles of food, its safety and specifying appropriate system of enforcing various standards. FSSAI also is accountable in providing scientific advice and technical support to Central Government and State Governments in the matters of framing the policy and rules in areas which have a direct or indirect bearing of food safety and nutrition. Apart from performing the responsibilities stated above, the FSSAI authority offers a fair opportunity to relevant stakeholders to participate in various draft notifications issued time to time. The objections or suggestions, if any, are required to be reviewed and addressed to the authority for effective consideration. The authority also provides a notice calling for suggestions, views, comments etc from various stakeholders within a period of 60 days on the draft Food Safety and Standards Regulations before any Gazetted notifications. Why Functional Foods? The term Functional foods means foods which provide benefits beyond basic nutrition and may play a role in reducing or minimizing the risk of certain diseases and other health conditions, as described in these regulations. They likely categories where functionalities can be linked to either ingredients or the products so made, have been created under these regulations and fall under the basic definition of �Functional Foods�. Foods or ingredients for which standards are provided include those that fall under FSSAI 2011 sub-regulation 12 of regulation 3, but do not include plants and botanicals listed in Schedule IV. Also vegetables, cereals, legumes, spices, fruits and other minimally processed forms cannot be constituted as �Health Supplement� or a �Nutraceutical�. The Nutraceutical/FSSAI-2013 regulations include Health Supplements, Nutraceuticals, Food for Special Dietary Use, Food for Special medical Purpose, Functional Food and Novel Food. This Nutraceutical regulations will come into force from 1st January 2018. With the regulations and regulatory bodies keeping pace with the consumer interests in going back to nature and natural healing through foods, it would be interesting to see the future convergence of the modern with the traditional ancient wisdom coming back full circle.

Biography

Speaker
Poornima Shankar / Sr, Research Scientist, Functional Foods Division, The Himalaya Drug Company, India

Abstract

Gum Arabic (GA) is a water-soluble dietary fiber which is mixture of polysaccharides, oligosaccharides and glycoproteins. It is exudates of Acacia senegal trees with remarkable health properties. Gum Arabic dissolves in water forming gel-like fluid with viscous sensation. It has the ability to slow the absorption and digestion of carbohydrates by viscosity effect of dietary fibers and may alter colonic microbial fermentation to generate short chain fatty acid (SCFA) mainly butyrate by which it may reduce the risk of metabolic syndrome. GA improves bowel movements, glycemic control and improves body weight. Animal studies on lipid-lowering effect of GA in the past few years have demonstrated conflict results, in human results conflict mainly related to dose and duration of GA consumption, however, the tolerability and compliance of a high dose along with medical medication is unclear and need to be investigated further. The mechanism by which GA intake leads to many health benefits is unknown but explained by many theories. Therefore, GA might be one of the dietary fibers which deserve attention as dietary supplements at this moment and as therapeutic agent in the future.

Biography

Rasha Babiker has MBBS and completed her PhD physiology from University of Medical Sciences and Technology (UMST), Sudan. She is the coordinator of the Physiology Department and Deputy, Dean Faculty of Medicine at UMST. She has published papers in reputed journals and has been a member of Sudanese Physiological society (SPS).

Speaker
Rasha Babiker / University of Medical Sciences and Technology (UMST), Sudan

Abstract

The food choices that are made by every individual, both because of survival needs and taste preference, cause a substantial and significant variability in gut microbiota. There is an increasing body of literature that links diet and the composition of the gut microbiome to an array of medical conditions, but, so far, very little about what specific targeted dietary changes are needed to help. Increased gut permeability appears to be the cornerstone of gut-microbiota-brain interaction. This can lead to translocation of gut microbiota and their products, and incompletely digested nutrients such as food proteins, into the blood stream; increasingly the likelihood that food proteins are seen by the body as �foreign�; increasing the risk of triggering a food-specific IgG reaction. There is huge potential for manipulating the microbiota to sustain, improve or restore the condition of the gut in at risk or diseased individuals. Manipulating the microbiota, for example by dietary changes, probiotics or even fecal microbial transplantation, are rational strategies for the prevention and treatment of diseases. The new paradigm linking leaky gut, food-specific IgG, inflammation and conditions such as IBS, obesity and mental health, among others, is both interesting and encouraging. The important point here is that dietary intervention, on this basis, is personalised; dependent on specific tailored food-IgG test results, providing a unique targeted approach, and this makes sense immunologically. This talk will evidence recent scientific literature regarding the impact that a IgG-guided elimination diet can have and explores its potential role in manipulation of the gut-microbiome-brain axis.

Biography

Dr Gill Hart is an expert PhD Biochemist with over 25 years� experience in the development, and validation of diagnostic tests and testing services. Gill started her career as Senior Biochemist at Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK and subsequently worked for a number of R&D companies developing unique diagnostic tests for hospital and consumer use. Gill joined the YorkTest team in 2005, and has applied her scientific and regulatory knowledge to all YorkTest services. Gill regularly gives lectures and has written many articles and papers published in scientific journals. Gill�s expertise covers a wide range of topics which include food intolerance.

Speaker
Gill Hart / YorkTest Laboratories, United Kingdom

Abstract

Tarhana is an important traditional fermented cereal-based food consumed as a soup widely in Turkey. There are some other cereal based fermented products similar to tarhana in Egypt, Iraq, Syria, Hungary, Greece, Finland and Scotland. Tarhana is mainly prepared by mixing yogurt, wheat flour, yeast, salt and different kinds of vegetables (tomato, green pepper, onion, paprika, etc.) and spices (mint, thyme, tarhana herb, etc.) by variable fermentation time for one to 22 days. Tarhana consumption is suggested for infants, children, the elderly and patients since it contains essential amino acids, vitamins, minerals and highly digestible proteins. The aim of this study is to enrich tarhana with grape seed extract and investigate the effects of this extract on biogenic amines (putrescine, cadaverine, spermine, spermidine and histamine) formation and some other chemical properties of tarhana. In the present study, grape seed extract was added at 0% (control), 1%, 2%, 4% levels to wheat flours in the tarhana production. Grape seed extract decreased putrescine, spermine and histamine concentrations significantly (P<0.05) while different levels of grape seed extract showed different effect on cadaverine concentration and had no significant effect on spermidine concentrations (P>0.05). Total free amino acid level of tarhana decreased with increasing levels of grape seed extract (P<0.05). The results of acidity analyses showed that grape seed extract had a significant effect on acidity of tarhana (P<0.05). On the other side, pH levels of tarhana fortified with grape seed extract was found at lower pH than control (P<0.05).

Biography

Sadiye Akan has graduated from Ege University Food Engineering Department (Turkey) with second degree and continues her M.Sc. at Ege University Institute of Natural and Applied Science. She has also graduated from Anadolu University Business and Administration Department (Turkey). She is studying on determination of some chemical properties of tarhana fortified with different levels of grape seed extract for both fermentation and storage period.

Speaker
Sadiye Akan / Ege University, Turkey

Abstract

The present study evaluates the lipid lowering activity of an antioxidant rich extract of Spinacia oleracea (NAOE) and aerobic exercise (AE) in rats fed with a high fat diet (HFD). HPTLC revealed the presence of rutin (8.5 %) among other antioxidants, flavonoids and phenolic acids in NAOE. Rats were divided into 7 groups including Control, HFD control and treatment groups. The treatment groups received NAOE (200 and 400 mg/kg), the standard drug orlistat (10 mg/kg), AE and a combination of NAOE (400 mg/kg) and AE (NAOEAE) daily along with HFD for 21 days. Orlistat, NAOE and NAOEAE treatments showed a significant reduction in food intake, while weight gain was attenuated significantly only by the orlistat and NAOE treatments when compared with the HFD administered rats. All treatments attenuated significantly the HFD elevated TC, TG, VLDL , LDL, pancreatic lipase and lipid peroxidation levels and restored successfully the HFD depleted HDL levels. Treatment with orlistat, NAOE and NAOEAE significantly restored the HFD depleted levels of GSH, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in pancreas, while AE restored significantly the activities of catalase and glutathione reductase only. It may be concluded that NAOE exhibited a promising lipid lowering effect by its inhibitory action on pancreatic lipase maybe due to the potent antioxidant activity of its NAO. However, the combination treatment NAOEAE produced the best results indicating the essential role of exercise along with consumption of antioxidant rich foods such as spinach in maintaining a normal lipid profile and controlling obesity.

Biography

Dr. (Mrs.) Vandana Sanjeev Panda completed her PhD in Pharmacology from Mumbai University. Her research for the last few years has changed focus from pure pharmacology to plant drugs and now functional foods where her lab is active in pharmacological evaluation of plant phytoconstituents, bio-molecules & endogenous substances for a variety of biological activities, their mechanistic studies and development of models for these activities. Her major work has been in the area of gastric and hepatoprotection, antidiabetic and cardioprotective activity, and studies on the metabolic syndrome. Her ongoing project includes a formulation of herbal drugs for thyroprotective activity and some regulators for appetite and obesity. She has 40 plus research papers with 850 citations in high Impact factor journals, a number of research awards and scholarships, and industrial projects to her credit. She sits on the editorial board of a few journals and is a reviewer for many reputed journals.

Speaker
Vandana Panda / Mumbai University, Mumbai INDIA

Abstract

Bisphenols are a class of chemicals widely used in food packaging industries. These uses result in consumer exposure via the diet. Bisphenol A (BPA) has a weak estrogenic activity and shows the highest toxicity in the infant population. A temporary tolerable daily intake of 4 µg/kg bw/day was recommended by EFSA. The EU Regulation n. 10/2011 fixed a migration limit of 0.6 mg/kg for BPA in food from plastic materials intended to come in contact with food. BPA residues into dairy food chain are a matter of public health concern, since dairy products are widely consumed by infants, children, and also adults throughout the world. The aim of the study was to investigate the occurrence of BPA, along the dairy supply chain, in milk samples collected from two bovine farms (A and B). For each farm, three milk samples were collected, during the winter for 9 weeks, by manual and mechanical milking and directly from the milk tank. The samples were stored at 4°C and analyzed using a solid-phase extraction procedure followed by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Results showed the distribution of BPA residues in the analyzed samples in a range of 0.009-2.776 µg/L (min-max value). BPA showed higher levels (mean values: 0.92 µg/kg) in samples of farm B than those of farm A. As BPA may be detected at each phase into the dairy supply chain, the risk factors should be considered according to a quality systems approach, and future efficient programs for food control should be developed.

Biography

Raffaelina Mercogliano has completed her PhD and postdoctoral studies from Department of Veterinary medicine and Animal Production of University of Neaples, Italy . She is Assistant Professor and teacher of Food law at the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production- Food Inspection Unit. She has published more than 27 papers in national and international journals.

Speaker
Raffaelina Mercogliano / Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, Italy

Abstract

Aim: In diabetes, oxidative stress and lipid abnormalities are frequent, pronounced and represent important factors, which are involved in the development of diabetic complications. Zinc deficiency induces oxidative stress although antioxidant Ruta chalepensis induces modulator role on oxidative stress in metabolic diseases. Therefore, Ruta chalepensis may be useful treatment of diabetes in zinc deficient rats. Thus the aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Ruta chalepensis extract on blood biochemical parameters, tissue zinc status and antioxidant system in streptozotocine diabetic rats fed zinc deficiency diet. Methods: Twenty eight male albino (Wistar) rats were divided into four groups: two groups fed a zinc-sufficient diet one non-diabetic and the other diabetic, while the others two groups diabetic rats were fed a zinc-deficient diet, one non-treated group and the other treated with the extract of Ruta chalepensis. After three weeks of the dietary manipulation, fasting animals were scarified. Results: Body weight gain of zinc-deficient diabetic animals was lower than that of zinc-adequate diabetic animals. It was noticed also that inadequate dietary zinc intake increased glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, urea, uric acid, creatinine and lipid peroxidation levels. In addition zinc deficiency diet led to a decrease in zinc tissues (femur, liver, kidney), glutathione concentration and both glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase activities. However, Ruta chalepensis treatment ameliorated all the previous parameters approximately to their normal levels. Conclusion: It seems that Ruta chalepensis supplementation is a potent factor for reducing the oxidative severity of zinc deficiency in experimental diabetes through its hypoglycemic and antioxidant actions. Keywords: Experimental diabetes; Rat; Zinc deficiency; Ruta chalepensis; Antioxidant

Biography

Speaker
Zine Kechrid / Department of Biochemistry, University of Annaba, Algeria

Abstract

Popović T1, Borozan S2, Ra�ić-Milutinović Z3, Debeljak-Martačić J1, Arsić A1, De Luka S4, Glibetić M1 1Institute for medical research University of Belgrade, Center of excellence in nutrition and metabolism, Serbia 2Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Belgrade, Serbia 3University Clinical Center Zemun University of Belgrade, Department of Endocrinology, Serbia 4Institute for Patological Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Serbia The study objective was to determine 1) the effect of fish oil on FAs composition and oxidative stress in aging, 2) erythrocyte enzymes activities of oxidative stress, malondialdehyde and FAs status in DM2 patients. Experimental model of aging (young Wistar rats-3 months, n=10 and aged Wistar rats-18months, n=10, fish oil, 6 weeks), and DM2 (12 females, 8 males, mean age 53�6) received 4g/day fish oil, 12 weeks. FAs phospholipids composition were measured by GC, oxidative stress and biochemical parameters by spectroscopy. In aged rats n-3 were decreased (p<0.001), n-6/n-3 (p<0.001) were significantly increased with aging. DHA (22:6, n-3) was significantly decreased (p<0.001), ETA (20:3, n-6) (p<0.05) and linoleic acid (18:2, n-6) (p<0.001) significantly increased compared to young rats. Lipid peroxidation was significantly increased in aging. In DM2 patients PON-1 activity increased by 105.2 % (p<0.05) and SOD increased by 23.5% (p<0.05). Improvement of PON-1 activity was associated with serum n-3 fatty acid increment by 52% (p=0.01). Increased PON-1/HDL-C ratio (by 95%) was independently associated with changing of MDA and 20:4n-6 (AA)/EPA ratio (p=0.01). HbA1c was improved significantly by 21% (p<0.01), and HDL-C by 19% (p=0.05). Aging as a risk factor lead to higher saturation of FAs in tissues phospholipids (n-6/n-3 ratio). Lipid peroxidation in aging is more pronounced and as a risk factor of oxidation more compromised. In DM2 patients n-3 FAs status presented biomarker of intake and indicated that fish oil added to a habitual diet improved antioxidant property of HDL-C increasing PON1 activity, SOD and MDA.

Biography

Speaker
Tamara Popovic / Institute for medical research University , Yugoslavia

Abstract

Psoriasis is common skin disease in developing countries. It can affect any part of the body but most common site is elbows, knees and scalp. Psoriasis is common skin infection affecting 2% of population of World. Aim of this study is to review the efficacy of herbal and allopathic drugs in the treatment of psoriasis. The review has been compiled using references from major databases Online Journals, Science Direct, Scopus, Open J Gate, Google scholar, Scirus, PubMed, Medicinal and Aromatic plants extract and Chemical abstracts. Psoriasis is usually treated with local and systemic medications that have different efficacies. The evidence supporting the efficacy of medicinal plants and allopathic treatment is well established in the treatment of psoriasis

Biography

Speaker
Muhammad Akram / The University of Poonch, Pakistan

Abstract

Child malnutrition represents an insidious plague that causes the death of 3.1 million children aged less than 5 years in the world every year. Recently, several studies have looked at the effect of intestinal flora on weight regulation. Our own objectives are to characterize the clinical profile and the composition of the intestinal flora of malnourished children and healthy ones, residents in the city of Mascara (Algeria). And the other one is to specify the impact of the administration of the renutrition milk on intestinal microbiota composition of malnourished children. In Total, 40 children of both genders aged between 2 months and 36 months were selected for this study. A clinical examination with pediatricians and microbiological analysis of the fecal matter was carried out. The first results revealed that malnourished children included in the study suffer from severe malnutrition characterized by stunted growth and remarkable underweight and their intestinal flora is quantitatively and qualitatively different from that healthy ones, on the one hand, on the other hand; the administration of the milk of renutrition has no significant influence on the composition of the intestinal flora in these malnourished children. Key words: infant Malnutrition, renutrition milk, intestinal microbiota

Biography

Speaker
BELGHARBI Asmaa / university of Mascara, Algeria

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