Scientific Program

Sessions:

Global Summit on Occupational Health & Safety

Abstract

As the amount and variety of occupational and safety data collected grows with the advent of electronic data collection and storage, the need for applying advances from artificial intelligence, big dataanalytics and predicative analysis to extract meaning from this interconnected body data has also grown. Currently, large databases are emerging that incorporate information about one’s life-time exposures to work related and environmental hazards and exposures with personalized health data. The term “exposome” has been used to describe a person’slife long environmental and occupational exposures related to one’s health. To be able to analyze patterns of relationships in thisdata, both at the level of the individual and populations of workers, new methods of analysis will be needed. In this presentation, advances, trends and potential application of a range of methods including data mining and predictive analytics will be discussed in the context of occupational health and safety. These methods have emerged from research in applied artificial intelligence and provide ways of discovering health and safety issues and concerns in work settings. This will also require methods for analyzing and querying large databases at the level of both individuals and populations to predict and prevent safety issues and hazards. In addition, these methods can be connected to advances in geographical databases. The discussion will conclude with a description of work towards developing acomprehensive field examining the role health informatics and information technology in occupational health– i.e. our work in the emerging field of occupational health informatics

Biography

Dr. Andre Kushniruk is Professor and Director of the School of Health Information Science at the University of Victoria in Canada and he is a fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics. Dr. Kushiruk is also an Adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Science and Engineering at Aalborg University in Denmark and Honorary Professor at the University of Hong Kong. Dr. Kushniruk conducts research in a number of areas including usability engineering, electronic health records, evaluation of the effects of information technology and human-computer interaction in healthcare. He has published widely in the area of health informatics.

Speaker
Andre Kushniruk University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada

Abstract

Learning Objectives and Results • An understanding of self-awareness and emotional intelligence, critical skills that lead to improved communications, influence and positive culture change. • How to create a culture of trust and open communications at all levels of the organization. • An understanding of “critical skills” that will that lead to improved safety, employee engagement and customer relations.

Biography

Experience Summary Bruce Bolger is a Safety Professional focusing on Leadership, Quality, Productivity and Safety. Bruce has 38 years’ experience working with high performance work teams including Nuclear Power, Construction, Manufacturing, Sales and Utilities. As a Certified Safety Professional and Certified Hazardous Materials Manager, Bruce has worked as a VP in Construction and as a Safety Director for the largest Utility in New England. Bruce has been a Leadership Academy Instructor for Northeast Utilities training on culture change and Supervisor / Manager Development. Past experience includes having worked with Dupont Safety Resources as a Senior Safety Consultant in the United States and Internationally.

Speaker
Bruce Bolger Bruce Bolger Company,USA

Abstract

Salmonellosis is an important but neglected disease in sub-Saharan Africa. Food or fecal-oral associated transmissions are the primary cause of infections, while the role of waterborne transmission is unclear. Samples were collected from different dug wells in a rural area of Ghana and analyzed for contamination with bacteria, and with Salmonella in particular. In addition, temporal dynamics and risk factors for contamination were investigated in 16 wells. For all Salmonella isolates antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed, serovars were determined and strains from the same well with the same serovar were genotyped. The frequency of well water contamination with Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria was 99.2% (n = 395). Out of 398 samples, 26 (6.5%) tested positive for Salmonella spp. The serovar distribution was diverse including strains not commonly isolated from clinical samples. Resistance to locally applied antibiotics or resistance to fluoroquinolones was not seen in the Salmonella isolates. The risk of Salmonella contamination was lower in wells surrounded by a frame and higher during the rainy season. The study confirms the overall poor microbiological quality of well water in a resource-poor area of Ghana. Well contamination with Salmonella poses a potential threat of infection, thus highlighting the important role of drinking water safety in infectious disease control.

Biography

Renate is a senior biomedical scientist at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH), the second largest teaching hospital in Ghana with five years working experience. After her senior high education in 2002, she decided to improve her skills and knowledge in Information Technology by undertaking six months certificate program at NIIT,Ghana. As part of her ambition, she decided to branch to the health sector by applying to one of the renowned universities in her country, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology(KNUST) to undertake a four year degree program in Bsc Medical Laboratory Technology. She completed her first degree in 2008 with second class upper division by presenting a thesis on a topic ‘Presence of Schistosomahaematobium ova in patients with acute appendicitis’ under the department of pathology. She did a one year internship after completion and because of her interest in research, got the opportunity to join a reputable research institution affiliated to KNUST, KCCR. Kumasi Center for Collaborative Research Medicine (KCCR),is a German institution which are into lot of projects ranging from microorganisms to molecular biology and Cell biology. After her one year stay at KCCR, she moved to KATH to work under the department of Haematology as a Biomedical Scientist because of her other interest in malignancies.Renate became senior after her three years working experience in the hospital. Fortunately for her, she won an award from American Society ofHaematology to undertake a three months training on haematological malignancies at Christian Medical College, India in Feb, 2015, which has improved her desire to engage in research related to malignancies. Renate is a multipurpose scientist, who has the capabilities to engage in all areas of research ranging from microbiology, chemical pathology, histopathology and haematology, although my main focus is on microorganism and malignancies.

Speaker
RENATE ASARE KOMFO ANOKYE TEACHING HOSPITAL,Ghana

Abstract

Although small-scale enterprises (SSEs) dominate the private enterprise sector, knowledge about support for these organizations from occupational health services (OHSs) is insufficient. Depending on the sector, 10% to 55% of Swedish employees in SSEs have access to OHSs, also the coverage is less in Norwegian SSEs. Several studies show that the majority of SSEs pay little attention to occupational health and safety issues and that specific strategies are needed to focus attention on these issues in SSEs. The aim of this study was to investigate the services OHSs are providing SSEs and OHSs’ cooperation with SSEs in Norway and Sweden. In total, 87 Norwegian and 51 Swedish OHSs completed a survey focused on how the providers experienced the following topics related to SSEs: organizational structure, number of customers and customers’ company sizes, range of services requested by the customer, cooperation, marketing, communication and cooperation, and challenges of the OHS in the future. The results point to significant differences between Norway and Sweden in regard to SSEs’ requests for services and consultations between SSEs and OHSs. Norwegian OHSs work with a more holistic approach to psychosocial and physical work environments, work organization, and leadership; Swedish OHSs work more with services focused on individual injuries and illnesses, individual health examinations, and rehabilitation. To improve OHSs in SSEs, OHS services should be marketed directly to SSEs, and closer collaboration between OHSs, SSEs, and enterprise networks is essential. The analyses also showed a need for financial incentives to increase utilization of OHS among SSEs.

Biography

Stig Vinberg is a Professor in Health Sciences at Mid Sweden University. He has during the last 35 years been working with occupational health and workplace development issues. Main research interests are leadership, workplace health promotion and small business development with emphasis on organizational factors. Bodil J. Landstad is Professor in Health Sciences at Mid Sweden University. She is also working as a Research Director at a Norwegian hospital. Main research interests are processes behind the inclusion of people who are either at risk of becoming marginalized or who are already marginalized in working life

Speaker
Stig Vinberg Mid Sweden University,Sweden

Abstract

The construction sector remains a relatively high risk segment in India . Construction workers experience a higher number of accidents or near miss incidents mainly due to falling from height. Work related conditions that are more prevalent in construction workers include falling from height, slips, trips and falls on stairways and ladders, fall due to energized electrical equipment at height, breakage of handrail and stair rail system and scaffold and injury caused by falling object, etc. Indian Construction industry employ a work force of nearly 40 million. This workforce comprise 55% unskilled labor, 27% skilled labor and rest are the technical and support stuff. As per the study1 out of 1,000 workers, 165 workers get injured during construction activities in India The objective of the study is to develop a participatory training programme for prevention accidents caused by falling from height in construction sites in India. PAOT METHODOLOGY Participatory Action Oriented Training (PAOT) methodology was used in this study, which is the combination of inspection, checklist and training and group discussion. to help local construction workers and employees to identify and apply realistic, low cost solutions to falling from height problems. As per the guideline of International Labour Organisation (ILO) the PAOT checklist “RANGOS” was developed to identify the gap between safe workplace and dangerous workplace. Then with the help of round table group discussions among employee, worker and technical experts, realistic low cost solutions were explored for these problems of falling from heights.The study was conducted in 15 construction sites in Delhi between April,2016 to August, 2017. Results The PAOT recommendations were successfully implemented in 12 construction sites out of 15 construction sites taken for the study in West Delhi and South Delhi. After implementation of these recommendations, the major accidents due to falling from heights have been reduced by 82% and near miss are reduced by 68% within a period of six months. Conclusion It is high time that a construction safety manual is evolved which will be a part of decision making criteria for every construction site related to ‘construction safety in India’. It is desirable to involve construction workers in developing safety culture in all construction sites and develop a mechanism for proper implementation and monitoring of safety and health standards in construction sites as preventive safety culture.

Biography

We will update it soon.

Speaker
PRANAB KUMAR GOSWAMI INDCARE COLLEGE OF LAW,India

Abstract

Healthcare is increasingly becoming automated with the advent and widespread deployment of information systems such as electronic health records, automated decision support tools and a wide range of mobile applications. Such systems have the potential to improve patient safety, by providing timely patient data, connection across differing databases and automated alerting and reminding of health professionals of patient problems and issues and have been shown to decrease patient adverse medical events. However, work my group has conducted has also shown that such systems may also inadvertently introduce errors and adversely affect patient safety if they are not carefully designed and tested. In this presentation a category of error we have termed “technology-induced” error will be described. Such safety hazards are not typically detected during the normal design and testing process of healthcare IT and are often not picked up until a system is already released. In this presentation, methods for reporting such error are discussed, including adverse event error reporting related to use of information technology. In addition, the use of clinical simulations to simulate complex workplace activities is described. Such approaches can be used to predict safety issues involving information technologies, before systems are widely released in hospital, clinical and other healthcare settings. It is argued such work needs to be conducted in order to ensure patient safety and lessen the impact of potential error introduced by health information technologies. The relation of this work to the emerging area of occupational health informatics will be explored.

Biography

Elizabeth Borycki is the Director of the Social Dimensions of Health and Health and Society programs at the University of Victoria. Elizabeth is also Professor in the School of Health Information Science at the University of Victoria. She has published over 180 articles, book chapters and several books in the following areas: patient and health information technology safety; quality and usability; and health information technology management. Her work led to her being elected to the International Medical Informatics Association International Academy of Health Sciences Informatics and one of the top 100 health informatics researchers in the world in 2017.

Speaker
Eizabeth Borycki University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada

Abstract

Seasonal employees at ski resorts represent a high-risk population for the use of alcohol, drugs, and other negative lifestyle behaviours. These employees work in a context where the customers are on holiday and hence frequently use alcohol. To our knowledge, research about the risky consumption of alcohol and drugs among seasonal employees is limited, particularly at ski resorts. In addition, young people are a vulnerable group for temporary employment. The overall purpose of our study was to evaluate the risky consumption of alcohol and drugs among employees at Swedish ski resorts, and to evaluate an policy-based intervention at one Swedish ski resort area. The intervention was led by a project leader together with managers from different tourism industries and the health sector. Components in the intervention were development and implementation of policies, education of managers, web-based communication and workplace-based measures. All employees at the participating 48 enterprises were invited to fill in a questionnaire with 43 questions concerning alcohol and drug use, social aspects, psychosocial working conditions, and health before and after the intervention. In addition, thirteen middle managers at the workplaces were interviewed after the the project period. The quetionnaire were answered by 611 individuals before and 423 individuals after the intervention. Comparisons before and after the project showed several positive results, e.g a significant reduction of hazardous drinking among the employees but no efffects on drug consumption. Results point at a need for early prevention initiatives focusing on the norms and work cultures of small- and medium-sized ski resorts

Biography

Maria Warne, PhD in health siences and lecturer at Mid Sweden University. Her main focus is health promotion in different settings as work place and schools. Stig Vinberg is a Professor in Health Sciences at Mid Sweden University. He has during the last 35 years been working with occupational health and workplace development issues. Main research interests are leadership, workplace health promotion and small business development with emphasis on organizational factors.

Speaker
Maria Warne Mid Sweden University,Sweden

Abstract

Representing the global trend in applying multifaceted improvements in both workplace conditions and work-life balance, participatory approaches are developing as practical means of promoting locally adjusted good practices. This is particularly the case in nursing and health care work. Common features of successful participatory action-oriented programs for improving health and safety of nursing and health care workers are reviewed. These programs emphasized multi-area improvements in occupational ergonomics and stress prevention. Usually, serial group work steps of learning local good examples, planning immediate improvement options and implementing prompt changes have led to many low-cost improvements in different workplaces. The achieved improvements address basic ergonomic measures, better internal communication and social support. Examples include improving communication, sharing information on teamwork, restful schedules, supportive climate and informal gatherings. Simplified procedures aimed at workplace-level group work have been found essential. The use of action-oriented tools such as action-checklists and practical guides focusing on feasible options has proven useful for promoting joint actions by workers and managers of participating workplaces. It has been found essential to train volunteer facilitators selected from among workers about workplace-level participatory steps utilizing locally adapted action tools. Particular attention is drawn to building on local good practices and emphasizing workplace culture of valuing cooperative relationships in daily work. Main contributing actors leading to positive achievements in taking these steps are (a) simple procedures aimed at multifaceted risk reduction, (b) a clear focus on locally feasible multifaceted improvements and (c) the use of locally designed action-checklists. It is suggested to promote participatory action-oriented programs by developing locally adjusted action tools and by training local facilitators in their use. Networking of participatory activities focusing on these aspects needs to be promoted internationally.

Biography

Dr. Kazutaka Kogi, Advisory Researcher of the Ohara Memorial Institute for Science of Labour in Tokyo, has been active in occupational health and ergonomics at international level. After graduating from the University of Tokyo Faculty of Medicine, he conducted applied research at this institute until 1983 when he joined the ILO as Regional Adviser on working conditions for Asia and the Pacific. During 1988-1993, he worked in the ILO headquarters as Chief of the Occupational Safety and Health Branch and Director of the Working Conditions and Environment Department. He then served as Director of the Institute for Science of Labour, Japan until 1999. He was President of the International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH) during 2009-2015, and he currently acts as Past President of ICOH. His major areas of interest are occupational health risk assessment and practical improvement of workplace conditions including participatory ergonomics particularly for small-scale workplaces.

Speaker
Kazutaka Kogi Ohara Memorial Institute for Science of Labour, Japan

Abstract

The purposes of this study to find out the relationship between job stress and worker job satisfaction. Job stress interrupts the workers emotionally and physically and enhances the poor durability and even destruction. The data was collected through survey and quantitative techniques were used. Civil Hospital Hyderabad medical staffs were used to determine the impact of job stress on job satisfaction. The job stress and worker job satisfaction reliability is 0.630. Which indicates the variable is reliable and good consistency. The value 0.003 is significant level. This positive value is showing that there is a positive relationship between job stress and worker job satisfaction. This research study has presented the influenced of job stress on worker job satisfaction

Biography

We will update it soon

Speaker
MOHSIN ALI university of science and technology of china hefei,China

Abstract

Occupational health in Sudan was continuouslydeteriorating in the last two decades for several reasons. The present study is an endeavor to fill the gap and improve occupational health in Sudan. The present work is a cross-sectional study conducted to inspect different industrial sectors' workplaces in Khartoum and Omdurman-Sudan. Workplaces inspection results and evaluatedwork related stress impact on workers' job performance would be explored. Methods: The study was implemented in 49 factories from Khartoum and 116 from Omdurman covering different industrial sectors. A modified workplace inspection checklist was utilized. Noise, illumination and heat stress were assessed. A representative sample of workers was selected including 531 workers from Khartoum and 475 from Omdurman. Three modified questionnaires were used to collect personal data, evaluate work stress and employees' job performance from each worker. Results: Results revealed that 42%of studiedworkplacesindustrial sectors in Khartoum and Omdurman were unsatisfactory (mean<50).Noise in 36.6% and heat stress in 77% of factories were exceeding threshold limits of factories, as well as, 68% of factories were lacking proper illumination. Workers which were exposed to high level of work related stress were 21 %, they were mainly unskilled single young females of low socioeconomic status and no hobbies. They were concentrated in unsatisfactory inspected workplaces. Low job performance was following the same pattern as high work-related stresshowever by a higher percentage of 44.5%.

Biography

Unsatisfactory workplaces with high noise levels, high heat stress and low illumination were mainly owed to lack of occupational health and safety resources, measures and legislations in Sudan. Although they were attributed to same reasons, work-related stress was inversely related to job performance.They were both correlated directly to unsatisfactory inspected workplaces. Thus improving inspection conditions in workplaces might reflect positively on decreasing work-related stress and enhance job performance.

Speaker
Adel Mahmoud Zakaria King Abdulaziz University,Saudi Arabia

Abstract

In spite of increasing governmental and organizational efforts, organizations still struggle to improve the safety of their employees as evidenced by the yearly 2.3 million work-related deaths worldwide. Occupational safety research is scattered and inaccessible, especially for practitioners. Through systematically reviewing the safety literature, this study aims to provide a comprehensive overview of behavioral and circumstantial factors that endanger or support employee safety.Over the last 40 years, major changes have taken place in the workplace. The growth in the use of information technology at work, the globalization of many industries, organizational restructuring, changes in work contracts and work time scheduling have radically transformed the nature of work in many organizations. The workforce itself is also diversifying, with an increase in female participation, a growing number of dual-earner couples and older workers. The present paper discusses the impact of these workplace transitions on employee well-being. We focus on four issues that are current concerns for organizations and the workforce; job insecurity, work hours, control at work, and managerial style. The paper concludes with some final considerations for researchers and practitioners that may benefit both employee well-being and organizational effectiveness.It will help in detecting the health hazards related to job and how job performance can be increased while working in a healthy and safe environment.The study will contribute in knowing the importance of occupational health and safety at work place for both employers and employees, and developing effective policies concerning health and safety at workplace.

Biography

Dr Deepa Aman has completed his PhD from IIT- India School of Mines, Dhanbad. She is the Technical Head - Safetyof Sure Safety India Pvt Ltd,SSIPL holds the honor of pioneering many technical service in Occupational Health and Safety. He has published more than 10 papers in reputed National and International Journals.

Speaker
Deepa Aman Sure Safety India Pvt Ltd, Vadodara, India

Abstract

On like before, night-shift schedule is the mandate of the day in the present generation, because of family finacial obligations. Meanwhile, wealth does not correlate with health, neither does the ability to work night-shift determine the level of one’s wealth. It is important to consider health and safety first when accepting new job schedule/offers. This study investigates how night-shift has contributed to workers’ poor well-being, life quality and divorces. 162 night-shift workers voluntarily participated in the study. Respondents were grouped into three age categories: 18-34, 35-54, and 55-74. Results revealed that 29% of the respondents felt depressed and 42% reported to have low energy after work night-shift. Divorce risk among the married respondents is 1-person in every 5-workers and 1 out of 1-workers have the risk of loosen interest in their usual activities. Education pattern forms a bell-curve shape with High School Graduate prevelence in night-shift work. 16% reported having very bad quality of life. 33% of the respondents revealed having concentration problems. The paired t-test result revealed that night-shift schedule in one way or another has a statistically significant impact on the workers’ well-being (t = 17.4, df = 162, p < 0.0001). Divorce rate, poor quality of life, usual activities interest and workers’health as a result of schedule suggest the need for better work schedule structuring. Findings from this study highlight potential damages night-shift schedule has done to human well-being and life style in general. It also revealed the education level at which one can escape night-shift schedule.

Biography

Dr. Fasanya had his Doctorate degree from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, with the specialties including Ergonomics and Human Factors and Occupational Health and Safety. Dr. Fasanya has worked as a Senior Research Associate with the US. Army in the Division of Auditory Protection and Performances. His research interests include Occupational Health and Safety, Ergonomics/Human Factors, Workers’ well-being, Noise Assessment, Auditory protection and performances, Lean and Six Sigma Principles, and Data Analysis. He is particularly interested in analyzing how noise exposure, stress, time, work activities and gender differences affect human behavior/performances in different environments, (natural or man-made).

Speaker
Bankole K Fasanya PURDUE UNIVERSITY NORTHWEST,USA

Abstract

Small scale industries account for a large proportion of our jobs and play a vital role in most countries’ economic growth and prosperity. However, the employees are routinely and regularly exposed to numerous physical, chemical and accidental hazards and the use of personal protective equipment (PPEs) is very low. PPEs are very effective in minimizing occupational injuries, accidents and other hazards which otherwise result in substantial manpower and financial losses. The aim of this study was to assess the availability and use of PPEs as well as self-reported occupational exposures among workers in surveyed small industries. The study involved 102 workers from 28 small scale industries (vehicle repair, welding, and paint). Questionnaire was developed based on socio-demographic, self-reported occupational exposures and frequency of PPEs used. The occupational exposures percentages reported (never, sometimes and always) including; noise exposure (19.6, 73.5 and 6.9%); dust/ smoke exposure (9.8, 69.6 and 20.6 %); vapors/ fumes exposure (11.8, 60.8 and 27.5%); direct sunlight/ heat exposure (43.1, 56.9 and 0%), respectively. The reported use of different PPEs in descending order was; knee joints mats (50%), welding shields (50%), safety glasses (33.3%), gloves (27.5%), face masks (26.5%), safety shoes (10.8%) and ear plugs/ muffs (8.8%). On the basis of study findings a health and safety awareness based intervention program was developed in order to minimize workplace exposures and their health implications for workers in recruited small scale industries.

Biography

Dr. Ijaz Ahmad has completed his PhD in Occupational hygiene from King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia. He has published more than 12 peer reviewed research articles and has presented his research work at international conferences, also he has been serving as an editorial board member of reputed USA based Journal, Journal of safety studies. Previously he has worked in the field of occupational health and safety for more than 5 years.

Speaker
Ijaz Ahmad King Abdulaziz University,Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Ergonomics is directly affects the risks of musculoskeletal disorders that currently cost US businesses $1 billion per week! Ergonomists know how to improve the design of office workplaces so that people will work in neutral postures that will benefit their health, eliminate musculoskeletal injury risks, and boost their productivity. However, traditional ergonomics programs typically are reactive, and interventions only happen after injuries have occurred. This ‘firefighting’ approach is unpredictably haphazard, costly and more challenging because often workers have already been injured. There are always too few ergonomists for too many cases in companies. Proactive ergonomics programs focus on strategies to prevent injuries from happening by early detection and intervention. But implementing a good proactive program requires proven early detection tools. Medicine provides a model worth copying. Regular health checkups allow physicians to detect patterns of risks factors for subsequent disease so that patients can change their lifestyles and/or medication to reduce disease risks. Similarly, regular ergonomics checkups can provide the same benefit. Modern computing power coupled with an ergonomic expert system can provide the predictive analytics tools and business intelligence that allows a wide variety of ergonomic risk factors to be evaluated quickly and at low cost. Prescient ergonomics is the new strategy that incorporates regular ergonomic wellness checkups for early detection of injury and other ergonomic risks, which then allows for early interventions, either training or products or both. Knowing what the injury risks are and who is at risk allows targeted interventions that prevents injuries which save money. Knowing what other ergonomic risks are present in the design of the tools, workplace, techniques etc. allows interventions that will improve productivity and reduce costs by ameliorating these risks. Prediction and prevention always beats reaction!

Biography

Alan Hedge, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell University and he directs the Cornell Human Factors and Ergonomics laboratory. He specializes in ergonomic designs that promote health, comfort and productivity, especially in office and healthcare workplaces. He is a Fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and was awarded the 2003 Alexander Williams Design Award and the 2009 Oliver Hansen Outreach award. He is also a Fellow of the Institute for Ergonomics and Human Factors (UK), a Fellow of the International Ergonomics Association, a Certified Professional Ergonomist, and a Chartered Ergonomist. He has published 4 books, 40 chapters and 230 articles on these topics. He is on the editorial board of several ergonomics and related journals. Since 2013 he has been the program chair for the National Ergonomics Conference and Exposition. He frequently speaks at national and international conferences and appears in the media, including TV, radio, newspaper and magazine articles.

Speaker
Alan Hedge Cornell University,USA

Abstract

Occupationalsafetyandhealthisgenerallydefinedasthescienceoftheanticipation,recognition,evaluationandcontrolofhazardsarisinginorfromtheworkplacethatcouldimpairthehealthandwell-beingofworkers,takingintoaccountthepossibleimpactonthesurroundingcommunitiesandthegeneralenvironment.Thisdomainisnecessarilyvast,encompassingalargenumberofdisciplinesandnumerousworkplaceandenvironmentalhazards.Awiderangeofstructures,skills,knowledgeandanalyticalcapacitiesareneededtocoordinateandimplementallofthe“buildingblocks”thatmakeupmost nationalOccupational health and safetysystemssothatprotectionisextendedtobothworkersandtheenvironment. Thescopeofoccupationalhealth and safetyhasevolvedgraduallyandcontinuouslyinresponsetosocial,political,technologicalandeconomicchanges.Inrecentyears,globalizationoftheworld’seconomiesanditsrepercussionshavebeenperceivedasthegreatestforceforchangeintheworldofwork,andconsequentlyinthescopeofoccupationalsafetyandhealth,inbothpositiveandnegativeways.Liberalizationofworldtrade,rapidtechnologicalprogress,significantdevelopmentsintransportandcommunication,shiftingpatternsofemployment,changesinworkorganizationpractices,thedifferentemploymentpatternsofmenandwomen,andthesize,structureandlifecyclesofenterprisesandofnewtechnologiescanallgeneratenewtypesandpatternsofhazards,exposuresandrisks.Demographicchangesandpopulationmovements,andtheconsequentpressuresontheglobalenvironment,canalsoaffectsafetyandhealthintheworldofwork.

Biography

Dr Yusuf has completed his Master degree in Occupational Health at the age of 32 years from Birmingham University – UK and Arab board in Family Medicine on 2008.Dr Yusuf has published several papers in reputed journals and serving as an editorial board member of repute, member of National occupational health and safety committee in Kingdom of Bahrain and the Head of Occupational health Unit in the Ministry of Health.

Speaker
Yousif Ahmed Ali Al-Haddad Ministry Of Health,Bahrain

Abstract

Workers in industrial battery factories frequently exposed to hazardous working environment that cause adverse effects on their oral and total health. Aim: To highlight oral and general health status among workers exposed to sulfuric acid fumes and mists in the production site of an old battery factory in Amman city, Jordan. Subjects and methods: The sample consisted of 24 subjects working in the production site and 15 in nonproduction line, matched in age and employment period, acts as controls. Structural questionnaires on medical and oral histories were completed by interview. Clinical examinations carried out to assess dental erosion, oral hygiene, periodontal status using the appropriate indices. Results: Questionnaires of workers in the production line revealed more than two-thirds of the acid workers (67%-86%) complained of teeth sensitivity, dry mouth; nose and throat, disturbed sense of taste, burning/itching eyes, and abdominal distress. More than half of the workers had headache, disturbed sense of smell, bleeding gums, and burning/itching skin. They exhibited significantly higher scores of dental erosion, poor oral hygiene, and gingivitis compared with the control group (P<0.05%). Conclusion: The presented cases revealed that unprotected workers in the battery work place suffer of serious oral and general health problems.These points the need of implementation of efficient monitoring and control of acid vapor emission in the workplace coupled with impart appropriate oral and general health education and care.

Biography

Dr. Faiez N. Hattab is currently affiliated to Private Dental Center, Doha, State of Qatar, continuing research in the specialized scientific area of Dental Research. Dr. Faiez N. Hattab is serving as an honorary reviewer for Journal of Blood Disorders & Transfusion & other reputed journals and has authored several articles along with chapters in different books related to Dental Research

Speaker
Faiez N. Hattab Essen, Germany

Abstract

Objective: - The objective of this paper was to apply the theory of Biorhythms as an intervention for prevention of work place accidents. Theoretical aspect of biorhythms has been empirically applied to past accidents data, which is collected from an automotive workshop. Method: - Biorhythms means regularly repeated life cycles. According to the theory of biorhythms, our lives are governed by three cycles, which are Physical, Emotional and Intellectual. Each of them have fixed duration of 23 days, 28 days & 33 days respectively. It is an established fact that human factor is responsible for majority of workplace accidents. Therefore, if one concentrate on human element, a low accident rate record can be achieved. For present study, past accident data were collected from an automotive workshop. Where, log of injuries that happened in the workshop was maintained. The log of injuries contains information pertaining to person involved in the accidents. Which includes name of the victim, date & time of accident, description of injury? The date of birth of the victim has been collected from the HR department. The collected accident Biography We will update it soon

Speaker
Pravinkumar Digamberrao Ukhlikar GOVERNMENT INDUSTRIAL TRAINING INSTITUTE, India

Abstract

Major depressive disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia (SZ) are the most common psychiatric illness. Deficit of employment status is common in patients with SZ. Previous studies have shown that several clinical factors such as positive and negative symptoms and depressive symptoms are associated with functional outcome. Recently, much more attention has been paid to cognitive impairment as it is a core feature of SZ. MDD has a significant negative impact on life functioning and on work-related outcomes such as employment status and work productivity, including absenteeism and presenteeism. In Japan, the number of patients who take leave of absence from due to depression is increasing. Although many patients could return to work after treatment for depression, it is reported that they frequently take an additional leave of absence or resign. Thus, recovery of social function and continuation of employment following treatment for depression should be considered as essential goals of treatment, in addition to improvement and maintenance of depressive symptoms. Neurocognitive function and social cognition are believed to be associated with the ability to continue working following a return to work in individuals with SZ and MDD. However, there is a lack of data investigating factors related to return to work and to continue to work after a leave of absence for the treatment of SZ and MDD.

Biography

Hikaru Hori has completed his Ph.D from University of Occupational and Environmental Health. He has published more than 90 papers in reputed journals. He has conducted several multicenter studies aimed at an investigation of neurocognitive function for schizophrenia and mood disorders.

Speaker
Hikaru Hori University of Occupational and environmental Health,Japan

Sessions:

Global Summit on Occupational Health & Safety

Abstract

European policymakers encourage individuals to become self-employed because it is a way to promote innovation and job-creation. Most of the self-employed choose to become self-employed and have good working conditions and job quality. However, around 20 percent of the self-employed report that they have no alternative for work and they have lower levels of job quality and worse well-being compared to the former group of self-employed. It can be assumed that health and well-being among self-employed and managers in small-scale enterprises is particularly crucial in this enterprise group due to that the smallness make them vulnerable. The purpose of this study is to investigate the occurrence of sickness presence among self-employed in relation to employed and to analyse if possible differences can be explained by higher work demands and time pressure among the self-employed. The study is based on the 5th European survey on working conditions 2015 (EWSC). The questions in the survey cover a wide range of topics designed to meet the EU's political needs. The main variables are sickness presence and several indicators of time pressure. Results show that self-employed report a higher level of sickness presence than employed; 52,4 verses 43,6 percent. All indicators of time pressure are significant related to the risk for sickness presence, also when controlling for background characteristics. Therefore, there is a need for practical implications at a societal and organizational level inlcuding preventive measures for European self-emloyed and further research of the mechanisms beyond the study results.

Biography

Mikael Nordenmark obtained his doctor's degree in Sociology in 1999 on the thesis "Unemployment, Employment Commitment and well-being - The Psycho-social Meaning of (Un)employment among Women and Men". Since 2006 Mikael holds a position as Professor in Rehabilitation Sciences at the Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University. Main research interests are relationships among working life, family life, gender and well-being. He has been a Research Fellow at the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (SCAS) in Uppsala and at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) in Stanford. Emma Hagqvist obtained her PhD in Health Sciences in 2016 presenting her thesis ‘The Juggle and struggle of everyday life. Gender, division of work, work-family perceptions in diferent policy contexts’. My research concerns working conditions, work-family balance, time use and health using an intersectional perspective. Ongoing projects focus on (1) self-employed individuals working conditions, work-life balance and health, and (2) healthy leadership. Stig Vinberg has completed his PhD from Luleå University of Technology, Sweden and is a professor in Health Sciences at Mid Sweden University, Sweden. He has during the last 35 years been working with occupational health and workplace development issues as a researcher, project leader and consultant. Main research interests are leadership, workplace health promotion and small business development with emphasis on organizational factors.

Speaker
Mikael Nordenmark Mid Sweden University,Sweden

Abstract

Health and well-being can defined by “how people think, feel, and function—at a personal and social level—and how they evaluate their life.” Health and well-being is inextricably linked to the environment that surrounds individuals and the groups of which they are members (e.g., families, work teams, communities, etc.). Staying safe, practicing preventive and health promoting behaviors, ensuring safe and healthful environments, and building cultures of safety, health and well-being brings significant value to employers, communities, and society at large. Such value may be generated by ensuring programs and initiatives that are designed around principles for best practice program design. Such principles include leadership, relevance, comprehensiveness, partnership, implementation, engagement, communications, being data-driven, and compliance. Measurement tools that represent a comprehensive and holistic perspective of workplace efforts are needed and will be discussed. Using these principles, several brief case studies will be presented that show quantifiable results. Finally, a complex systems view will be discussed that allows for multiple relationships to be considered when thinking about well-being as a global goal of integrated and coordinated occupational health and safety efforts implemented via the workplace.

Biography

we will update it soon.

Speaker
Pronk, Nico P Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, USA

Abstract

According to Deloitte’s 2016 Global Human Capital Trends report, employee engagement is a top talent issue facing organizations today, with 85% of surveyed executives rating engagement as important to them. As the methods and tactics to measure engagement continue to expand, so does the challenge of addressing this critical human capital issue. Despite the emergence of many tools for frequently evaluating employee sentiment, 64% of organizations still only measure employee engagement annually — which is no longer enough to deal with a multi-generational and changing workforce. Learn effective strategies to measure engagement as well as the role of business leaders, managers and HR to be always listening to the voice of employees, acting on findings, and making meaningful progress on engagement.  The disconnect between employees and management  The manipulation of numbers or processes  The tension between partners  The disagreement about strategy  The clash of different personalities  The hidden agenda  The wrong job fit

Biography

we will update it soon.

Speaker
Mohamed Mesbah Resilience& UK

Abstract

In Quebec, occupational diseases caused 137 deaths in 2016. There were 8235 cases of occupational diseases in Quebec at the same year. In Quebec and elsewhere in the world, SMEs have higher rates of occupational injuries and lower occupational health and safety (OHS) performance than large firms. In addition, if the annual rate of work accident in Quebec continues to decrease (- 4.8%) that of occupational diseases increases (+ 2.7%). The aim of this research project is to study the practises of occupational disease management in Quebec SMEs by detailing the management elements for the prevention of occupational diseases. The goal is to protect workers’ health and safety in Quebec SMEs. A critical review of the literature was carried out in three distinct phases. The first phase presented an overview of the OHS performance in SME. The second phase led to identify the management elements for the prevention of occupational diseases. The third phase is devoted to analyzing how SMEs practice these elements. The results of this work led to identify more than 140 management elements related to the prevention of occupational diseases in SMEs. Our principal conclusion is that the practises of occupational disease management in SMEs is bad. Finally, this work will be used as a basis for a major project in OHS management in SME.

Biography

Fara Randrianarivelo is currently pursuing the MSc degree in Hygiene and Industrial Security at Université de Québec à Trois-Rivières, QC, Canada. She received the BSc degree in Chemical Engineering from Ecole Superieure Polytechnique d’Antananarivo, Madagascar, and the MSc degree in Process Engineering from Université Paris 13, France, in 2012 and 2015, respectively.

Speaker
Fara Randrianarivelo University of Quebec at Trois-Rivières, Canada

Abstract

Most recent estimates of World Health Organization pointed out that the enormous proportion of world’s population, approximately 9 out of 10 breathe contaminated air. Almost 4.2 million deaths occurred every year due to the exposure of ambient air pollution. In India, Kanpur gets to hold on the worst city in air pollution concerning PM 2.5 concentrations of 173 micrograms per cubic meter. The Kanpur city is well-known for its leather industry, polluting nature of leather tanneries is evident from the notorious odour that characterizes tanneries and tannery zones. The environment influences the health of the people of Jajmau area of Kanpur city where hundreds of leather tanneries are located. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence and pattern of respiratory health problem among people living in adjacent to the leather industry of Jajmau area of Kanpur, India. This paper used primary data obtained from a cross-sectional household study of tannery workers from Jajmau area of the city of Kanpur, which was conducted during January-June, 2015, as part of a doctoral program. The study covered 573 men selected using scientifically developed study design using probability sampling approach. The descriptive statistics have been used to achieve the objective of this study. The men living adjacent to tanneries are at higher risk of developing symptoms of the respiratory problem. For instance, the prevalence of respiratory problems such as a cough or cough up phlegm most days and nights for at least 3 months in the previous year (10.0%), usually bring up phlegm from your chest first thing in the morning (17.1%) and brought up phlegm from your chest like this most mornings for at least 3 months in previous year (9.1%) reported by the men. Around 12 percent of the respondent experienced the symptoms of Asthma and Chronic bronchitis.

Biography

we will update it soon.

Speaker
Gyan Chandra Kashyap International Institute for Population Sciences, India

Abstract

Aim: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and potential risk factors of cardiovascular diseases among male tannery workers.Methods: Data for the study was obtained from a cross-sectional household survey conducted during the period January - June 2015. The study was conducted in the Jajmau area of Kanpur and 284 tannery and 288 non-tannery workers were interviewed who were selected using scientifically developed study design ofprobability sampling approach. Asthma was diagnosed if respondent reported the symptoms “Have you had wheezing or whistling in your chest at least 3 months in the last one year” and chronic Bronchitis was diagnosed by the symptoms “Did you cough up phlegm most days or nights for at least 3 months in previous year”. Univariate and bivariate analyses were used to assess the prevalence, and logistic regression analysis was used to identify the potential risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Results: The overall prevalence of symptomatic Asthma and Chronic Bronchitis was 12% each for tannery workers and it was 9 percent for asthma and 6 percent for Chronic Bronchitis among non-tannery workers. The prevalence of Asthma and Tuberculosis diagnosed by the doctors was 2.46% and 2.11% among tannery workers. The study has also poised the evidence of symptoms of Asthma.The symptoms were“Had a flu-like illness with aches and pains, fever, chills, and night sweats in last 12 months” (50-27%), “Usually, have a cough first thing in the morning” (24-11%), “Usually bring up phlegm from your chest first thing in the morning”, (20-14%), “Usually experience chest contestation” (18-10%), “Cough up phlegm most days or nights for at least 3 months in the previous year” (12-6%), and “Woken by an attack of shortness of breath at any time in the last 12 months” (6.3-3.8%) of tannery and non-tannery workers respectively. Results from the study show that the prevalence of symptoms of Tuberculosis experienced often in last one year reported by tannery and non-tannery workers in Kanpur city. The symptoms of “Fatigue” (26-15%), “Fever”(18-6.6%), “Excessive sweating, especially at night” (19-9%), “Breathing difficulty”(14.4-4.2%),“Weight loss”(14-4.2%), “Chest pain” (9.2-3.8%), and “Coughing up blood” (0.4-0.0%) was also present among tannery and non-tannery workers respectively. The results of logistic regression show that Asthma is evidently associated with the education of tannery workers. Tannery workers who have completed high school & above education are less likely to have Asthma [OR=0.43*; CI: 0.08-2.18] in Model-I. Tannery workers who had working experience of 11-20 years are prone to have Asthma [OR=3.10*; CI: 0.992-9.693] and Chronic Bronchitis [OR=3.66**; CI: 1.14-11.72] in Model-II. Odds of chemicals in air reveals that the tannery workers having moderate/high exposure are 3.7 times [CI: 0.55-24.41] times more likely to have asthma and 2.42 times[CI: 0.28-21.27] times more likely to have Chronic Bronchitis. Conclusions: This study exposed the factors which are consistently associated with cardiovascular diseases among the tannery workers areage, education, media exposure, standard of living index, work experience in the current tannery, chemicals in the air.

Biography

we will update it soon.

Speaker
Gyan Chandra Kashyap International Institute for Population Sciences, India

Abstract

Have you ever thought about wellbeing as a business improvement tool? Wellbeing is a massively overused term which means all things to all people and has resulted in wellbeing not being clearly defined or understood. It is often the ‘soft and fluffy’ side of wellbeing which is the focus of organisational interventions and whilst such interventions are clearly beneficial to individuals, on their own they are unlikely to result in any long-term sustainable effects on the organisation. When we really harness the full power of wellbeing the individual and organisational effects are immense. To do that, we need to address wellbeing in the same way as we address safety, by identifying and eliminating the primary wellbeing risks. Mental health and stress are currently receiving a lot of press, mainly because work-related stress figures significantly in HSE’s Strategy for 2020 – Helping GB Work Well. Yet the presence of work-related stress is a key indicator of the failure (or absence) of an effective wellbeing strategy, so if we proactively (rather than reactively) manage the root causes (rather than the symptoms) of stress in our organisations then we create wellbeing and enhance the Quality of Working Life for all. The emphasis needs to be on creating wellbeing (both organisational and individual) rather than waiting for signs of stress and then taking action. Wellbeing means feeling good and functioning well. It underpins employee engagement and can be a source of competitive advantage, innovation and growth, leading to better business performance. Central to creating a wellbeing culture is the identification of the presence (or absence) of the key wellbeing drivers and where necessary intervening at the organisational level to enhance individual and organisational wellbeing. If we take an integrated approach to wellbeing and engagement, which addresses both individual and organisational issues, then this enables sustainable individual and organisational wellbeing, engagement and business performance.

Biography

Carolyn is Operations Director of OCAID Wellbeing. She is an organisational psychologist with significant experience in the Health, Safety and Wellbeing field. Wellbeing, Safety Behaviours and Organisational Development. Carolyn successfully ran her own business for over 20 years and recently spent 2 years at HSE prior to joining OCAID to head up their Wellbeing business. Carolyn has also spent some time working in Australia. Carolyn has a proven track record within a diverse range of national and international businesses. Her consultancy experience spans numerous industry sectors including construction, oil and gas, food, utilities, packing and retail. An experienced conference speaker with a number of papers and publications to her name Carolyn is both widely experienced and well qualified to benchmark and design organisational Wellbeing and Safety Culture interventions that will enhance both employee engagement and wellbeing whilst creating resilient people in resilient organisations. Her aim is always to help to create sustainable change within organisations thereby enabling them to not only maintain but continuously improve their Health, Safety and Wellbeing culture.

Speaker
Carolyn Yeoman OCAID Wellbeing, United Kingdom

Abstract

The Agricultural Research Council –Onderstepoort Veterinary Research (ARC-OVR), based in South Africa and specialising in animal health research employs the services of Manobo Cleaning Services for all cleaning work. These cleaners are placed in every department and laboratory within the ARC-OVR in order to perform cleaning work for infection and contamination prevention, office and laboratory hygiene purposes.South Africa is one of the countries where the prevalence of occupational dermatological disorders has increased, accounting for between 5-6% of all claims submitted to the Compensation Commissioner of the Department of Labour under the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act. Due to under-reporting of occupational diseases by employers and medicals practitioners, delays in processing reported claims, and inadequate assessment of disability there are systematic deficiencies in the administration of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act resulting in a poor reflection of the real number of occupational skin diseases that occur annually in South Africa. Due to limited South African literature related to occupational skin disorders in agricultural research facility cleaning personnel, a descriptive cross-sectional study was undertaken aimed at determining the prevalence of self-reported hand and forearm occupational skin disorders among cleaners, and describe work-related risk factors associated with the development of occupational skin disorders at the ARC – OVRthrough the use of a validated structured self-diagnosis questionnaire.

Biography

Mr Mann Mokoatle is employed by The Agricultural Research Council – Onderstepoort Veterinary Research as a Manager: Occupational Health, and as a researcher in Public Health. He is also a member of the ARC – OVR Institute Biosafety Committee. He holds a degree in Environmental Health, a Bsc Honours in Environmental Management, a Higher Certificate in Management, is currently completing his Master’s degree in Public Health – Occupational Hygiene, and a 2019 Ph.D candidate in Veterinary Public Health with a focus on Biosafety among veterinary science researchers.

Speaker
Mann PM. Mokoatle University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

Abstract

In the United Kingdom (UK), all employers have a legal duty to put in place suitable arrangements to manage safety, health and wellbeing. Ideally, this should be a part of the everyday processes of conducting business (in the Higher Education-research, study or support activities) and/or providing a service. It should also be an integral part of positive workplace behaviours and attitudes. The UK legislative framework places the main duties on employers to ensure that the workplace is safe for employees and others who may be affected (eg students, visitors, contractors etc.). The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) highlights the key principles of effective health and safety management in its revised guidance document HSG65. • leadership and management (including appropriate structure and effective processes) • a trained/skilled workforce • an environment in which people are trusted and involved These principles underpin HSE’s ‘Plan, Do, Check and Act’ model for managing health and safety in a simpler and more pragmatic way. The ultimate responsibility for ensuring health, safety and wellbeing rests with the University Board. Day-to-day responsibility is delegated to the University Principal/Vice Chancellor (takes on the leadership and management responsibility and leads on health and safety at Board level as well as chairing the Health and Safety Committee). The Health and Safety specialists provide expert advice, strategic and operational support and a comprehensive training programme to all layers of managers, safety representatives and staff on matters of health, safety and fire safety at work. With this framework and principles in mind, Zarah Laing will discuss how she has implemented and achieved an award winning health and safety management system at Queen Mary, University of London for their 25,000 students and 5000 staff across multiple campuses in UK and overseas.

Biography

Zarah Laing joined Queen Mary University of London in 2009 and became the Director of Health and Safety in February 2015. Outside the University, she chairs the Universities Safety and Health Association (USHA) London Regional Group. Zarah holds a Master’s Degree in Management of Occupational Health and Safety, 1st Class Degree in Occupational Health, and a Degree in Philosophy. She is also a qualified nurse and trained in Fire Safety Risk Management. She worked as Occupational/Health and Safety Manager in various sectors in the last 20 years ranging from Retail, Local Authorities, NHS Hospitals and an FE College. She is the winner of British Safety Council International Safety Award ‘Merit’ Category and the winner of Wellbeing Initiative in 2018.

Speaker
Zarah Laing Queen Mary University of London, England, United Kingdom

Abstract

Work place performance is dependent on a multitude of factors in the work place, within the personal characteristics of the employees and on the personal performance or leading strategies of the employer.Food retail shops in Norwayare staffed with young persons, often students seeking part time jobs. Trade union membership is rare, and occupational health service is distant if existing at all. The employer may not adhere to rules of length of work day, sickness absence regulations or the employers wish to know when to work in the future weeks. The results of such a management style is demonstrated by the appearance of three employees entering the private psychiatric practice of the author. Anxiety and conflict avoidance in employees contribute to the possibility of maintaining an unhealthy work environment. To which extent is this occurring in other countries as well?

Biography

John E. Berg is currently professor of public health at Oslo Metropolitan University. He is specialist of psychiatry and occupational health and an economist and he has published close to 100 scientific articles. The areas covered are sick leave certifications by GPs, drug addict treatment and mortality, cardiovascular risk evaluation in occupational health, clinical and cost-benefit outcomes of psychiatric and drug addict facilities treatment. He has also published 5 textbooks on health economics, drug addict treatment and acute psychiatry.

Speaker
John Erik Berg Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway

Abstract

The maritime workplace remained to be one of the world’s high risk occupations (Nielsen et al, 2013). Maritime standards, competencies, and health and safety policies and practices were proven to be inadequate in preventing work related injuries and accidents on board seafaring vessels. It was in this light that safety culture was adopted in the shipping industry. Hence, this study aimed to assess the shipboard safety culture among cadet seafarers in relation to specific seafaring vessel types (tanker or bulk). This study primarily followed a cross sectional research design. It aimed to assess and compare shipboard safety culture from the cadet seafarers’ perspective thru prevalence school based survey using a Likert scale, and qualitative probing thru key informant interviews and a focus group discussion were conducted. The cadet seafarer participants were chosen from the PMMA fourth year students enrolled for the academic year 2015-2016. Survey data gathered were treated with chi square test (critical value of 0.05 levels) while data gathered from key informant interviews and focus groups discussion were presented and analyzed by themes. Data gathered revealed differences in the survey scores; however, the bar graph of all the safety factors surveyed revealed a positive and similar trend of shipboard safety culture on board in both tanker and bulk vessel types. Computed chi square scores revealed no significant difference between the tanker and bulk shipboard safety cultures in all eight safety factors, although more unsafe work conditions/ acts and on board health injuries/ accidents were reported among bulk respondents.

Biography

Dr. Oscar Cristito L. Rosete finished his Bachelor of Science (Psychology) from the Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines and Doctor of Medicine from the Far Eastern University - Nicanor R. Reyes Medical Foundation, Manila, Philippines. He had his Post-Graduate Diploma and Master of International Health from the University of the Philippines Open University, Los Baños, Philippines. He is a diplomate and fellow of the Philippine College of Occupational Medicine. At present, he is the Head of the Medical Unit of the Philippine Merchant Marine Academy, San Narciso, Zambales, Philippines.

Speaker
OSCAR CRISTITO L ROSETE Philippine College of Occupational Medicine, Philippines

Abstract

Computers are an essential part of our everyday life. Ergonomics at workplace is a very important factor that cannot be over looked in the information technology working environment. This study was undertaken to assess reporting of occupational health among Desktop and Laptop users including children. A personal survey and a TV LIVE programs was carried out among computer users including children. Hundreds of calls were attended from various media channels and those were invited to the computer injury prevention research centre for studying their pains and learning their style of working. The main findings from the present work showed symptoms such as eye strain, neck pain, back pain, shoulder pain and pain in the carpal tunnel region were common among computer users including children. Severity of pain increased with number of hours of computer use at work which was found only in unscientific style of workers. Materials and methods : Cross sectional study was conducted among the computer users like software professionals, Government officers of various departments and were interacted through a LIVE tv programme and were asked several questions to know the strains while working with computers and were also invited to the research center for further study and guided them towards safety. Results : The prevalence of the computer related occupational injuries were reported by morethan 90% of the callers on LIVE tv show in our study. Association of the duration of the computer use, typing techniques while using them and the furniture used was also noted. Very few were aware of the seriousness of computer related injuries. Symptoms were with more in people who were not working on 10 fingers touch typing skill and non ergonomically designed furniture and its placements. Conclusions : Visual strains and physical strains constitute an important part of computer related injuries. This warrants vigilance in identifying and effectively guiding them. The study has also thrown light on various ergonomic factors contributing to its occurrence. Effective management requires a multidirectional approach combining health education, introduction of ergonomics, touch typing skill training and more awareness programmes from the Governments and computer manufacturers too will help in preventing them. Keywords: eye strain, neck pain, headaches, back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, repetitive strain injury, musculoskeletal disorders and mental strain.

Biography

Dr. H.M.Arun Kumar has been honoured with honorary PhD by World Records University, U.K. and is a researcher in Computer Injury Prevention techniques in India, who is passionate about Occupational Health and Safety of computer users at Workplace and Community Health. He is currently Founder of Computer Injury Awareness and Prevention Society., Bangalore. He is an inventor of Supersonic Safe Typing techniques, Inventor of Ergonomic Furniture specially designed for computer users. He is also a World Record Holder for working on computers in various styles like in Cross-hand and to type by Sitting behind the Laptop. He has more than 22 years of professional experience and has advised on computer safety in various Televisions including CNNIBN, Doordarshan, Udaya tv, Zee News, Suvarna News, Amrita News, Kairali News, and many more. He was featured in various leading Daily Newspapers like The Times of India, The Deccan Herald, The Hindu, The New Indian Express, Khaleej Times and many more. He has advised on ergonomics to various Government top officers including bureaucrats like District Judges, IAS Officers, Commissioners of various departments including Police, Income Tax, Customs, Film Stars, and Doctors, Engineers, Advocates and students too. People have come from all over India and even from Dubai, USA, London, and Singapore to undergo a special training in computer touch typing and ergonomics from him. He was honored by various organizations including Rotary International, Air India, and many more. He is a Life-member of Indian Society of Ergonomics., Kolkota and Life-member of Association of Occupational Health (AOHK), Karnataka. He is now willing to spread awareness worldwide and to help the governments in modifying the present safety policy by becoming International Computer Safety Advisor or Brand Ambassador to spead the awareness which is spreading at an alarming rate. His computer safety guidelines are currently published in National Safety Council 2018 Diary.

Speaker
H M Arun Kumar Supersonic Ergonomics and Typing Research Institute , India

Abstract

Wellbeing is defined as being the state of being comfortable, healthy, or happy. Health and safety professionals can contribute to ensuring that individuals at work are afforded the best possible working environment and conditions to allow them to achieve this atate. Often the ‘health’ aspect of ‘health and safety’ is given a lower priority but in more recent years the recognition of the effects of stress on individuals and the impact on themselves and their organisations has raised in profile. For the UK the HSE statistics for 2016/2017 state that 12.5 million working days are lost due to work-related stress, depression or anxiety and 526,000 workers are suffering from work-related stress, depression or anxiety (new or long-standing), These figures send a clear message to employers that more needs to be done to protect the health of the workforce. To achieve this organisations must have a robust system to identify stressors and provide effective mechanisms to reduce individual stress within the workforce. This paper will consider how the HSE stress management standards that relate to : Demands, Control, Support, Relationships, Role and Change can be put into practice. In addition it will provide practical case study information on the holistic support mechanisms that may be developed and put into practice to reduce stress related illness and absence.

Biography

Lisa Fowlie is a Past President of IOSH and is currently the Deputy Head of Health, Safety and Wellbeing at Bradford University. Lisa has a passion for pro active health and safety and has over 30 years experience of working within Public and Private organisations, where one of the main focusses has been on effective stress management programmes. She completed her degree in Health and safety In Aston University and her MSc in Training and Human Resource Management in Leicester University.

Speaker
Lisa Fowlie University Of Bradford, England, United Kingdom

Abstract

Mental health and Wellbeing : has the panacea arrived or not During the last 15 years there has been explosion of interest and research into mental health and wellbeing which has seen many advances in the promotion of mental health and wellbeing . Indeed now health and wellbeing could be considered mainstream and part of some work cultures. Early health and wellbeing programs looked at organisational / primary interventions to compliment individual / tertiary intervention . However in the recent years there has been drive to promote tertiary interventions such as resilience and mindfulness . The question that needs to be asked is does the current approach provide the panacea to health and wellbeing or is there something else that organisations need to be engaging in. The talk will address this

Biography

we will update it soon

Speaker
peter kelly Health and Safety Executive, United Kingdom

Will be updated soon...


Change Color